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Elephind.com contains 12,833 items from Waynesburg Messenger, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Southern Sews from Southern Sources. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

Southern Sews from Southern Sources. The Lincoln regiments, says the Memphis JfoalancJie , are returning home the very moment their periods of service expire, pretending they will volunteer again for three year*. A likely story ! Why don't they stay when their services are so much needed, if they are in earnest. MORE ABOUT THE BATTLE—THE REBEL PANIC. A member of the palmetto Guard writes to the Charleston Mercury: We have had a terrible, though glorious fight—this makes the second. The fight commenced on thfl left flank of our line, and we in the center Marsh's and Kershaw's Regiments,) received orders to march. When you were in church we were in the bloodiest fight recorded that has ever transpired in North America. The day was lost when our two regiments come. Our troops wero falling back, and had retired some distance. Colonel Kershaw gave the command forward, and after some ten or twelve rounds, away went the Yankees. I understand Beauregard said our regiments "saved the d...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
A TOUCHING SCENE. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

A TOUCHING SCENE. A French paper says that Lucille Rome, a pretty girl, with blue eyes and fair hair, poorly but neatly clad, was brought before the Sixth Court of Correction for vagrancy. "Does any one claim you?" asked the magistrate. " Ah ! my.good sir," said she, " 1 have no longer friends; my father and mother are dead—I have only my brother James, but he is as young as Iain. Oh, Sir! what can he do for me ?" " The Court must send you to the House of Correction. " Here I am sister—here I am ! do not fear!" cried a childish voice from the other end of the court, and a\ lhe same instant a little boy with a lovely countenance started forth from amid the crowd, and stood before the judge. i'Who are youl" asked he. "James Rome, the brother of that little girl." '•Your age!" "Thirteen." "And what do yon want;" " 1 come to claim Lucille." "But have you the means of providing for her?" "Yesterday I had not, but now I have. Don't be afraid, Lucille." "Oh' how good you are, James...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
A Noble Youth. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

A Noble Youth. The following anecdote was related to a gentleman during a night he spent in a farmhouse in Virginia, some years ago: . In December 17—, Toward the close of a dreary day, a woman with an infant was discovered half buried in the snow by a little Virginian seven years old. The promising lad was returning from school, and hearing the moans of some one in dis tress, threw down his sachel of books, and repaired to the spot whence the sound proceeded, with a firmness becoming one • of riper years. Raking the snow from the benumbed body ot the mother, and using means to awaken her to a sense of her deplorable condition, tbe noble youth succeeded in getting her upon her feet; the infant, nestling on its mother's breast, turned its eyes toward their youthful preserver, and smiled, as it seemed, in gratitude for its preservation. With a counte - nance filled with hope, the gallant youth cheered the sufferer on himself, bearing within his tiny arms the infant child, while ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Slaughter of Black Horse Cavalry. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

Slaughter of Black Horse Cavalry. Mr. Charles Furrand, of Lansing, a member of the First Michigan Regiment, gives the following account of the charge of the Black Horse Cavalry at Bull Run, which is by far the most graphic and evidently correct one yet published : At this moment the Black Horse Cavalry made its appearance obliquely from the right; all the while the masked battery, as well as infantry, was pouring upon us a fearful tire of shot, shells, canister, &c. As the cavalry appeared, six hundred strong, upon the full gallop, carbine in hand, our firing, for the moment, mostly ceased, each man reserving his charge to receive them with suitable honors. The horses of the cavalry were all black or gray. Their front showed a line of perhaps ten rods. Our fire was reserved until the left of their front was within five or six rods of our right, when we poured a continuous volley at them, killing most of the horses in front and many on their sides. As they fell, pitchin...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Singular Meeting of Brothers. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

Singular Meeting of Brothers. A correspondent of the Richmond "Dispatch," writing from "Camp, near Manassas, July 27th," relates the following incident of the meeting, after a separation of seven years, between two brothers, one a member of the New Orleans Washington Artillery, the other belonging to the Minnesota Infantry. He says: "We weat into a stable at Centreville, where thirteen wounded Yankees were, a<id upon entering found a Washington Artilleryman seated by the side of a wounded soldier, evidently ministering to him with great care and tenderness. He remarked 'that it was very hard to fight as he had fought, and turn and fiud his own brother fighting against him,' at the same time pointing to the wounded soldier f;om whose side ha had just risen. I asked him if it was possible that was his brother. "Yes, sir, he is my brother Heury. The same mother bore us, the same mother nursed us. W« meet the first time for seven years. I be* long to the Washington Artill...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
» .. _ A Romantic Adventure. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

» .. _ A Romantic Adventure. A very romantic adventure is related in the New York papers. A young girl of thirteen years, of respectable parentage in the city of Dublin, Ireland, fell in love with a ycuth of seventeen, of the same place. He came to America in the capac- j ily of a ship carpenter. She followed, in ; search of hiiu. Her subsequent history is thus told in the New York Journal of Commercce ot Saturday: — "She shipped as cabin boy on board of a vessel I at Liverpool, and made several voyages j ii. that capacity. After spending two years in this way, she shipped as a deck hand on board the ship Resolute, in which vessel she made her last voyage, but had never succeeded in finding her lover. During these three years her sex was not discovered, and probably would not have been for some time hence, had she not refused to treat, the second time, a party of J sailors with whon she was drinking at the Water Street Saloon on Thursday evening. One ot these men becoming angr...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
ITAR WIT. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

ITAR WIT. A 0AO TO JEFF. DAVIS. * The following from the the Knickerbocker for July was written . by a genius that is bound to shine some day, if he lives and does well : OH, wonderful man, Dare I hope my pen can Do justice to such a grate feller ns you i Oh, wot kin I say, Or what kin I do, In a poetick manner to put you through! Ah. where shall Hook, In what history or book, To find out your ckwal, by hook or by crook? There was Seizer an* Brackus, Punch us Pilot an' Backus, Napowlion, Mark Antony, Bruieus.and Burr, Onu an' all in their time made a stir; There was AUover Crommell, that knocked off the crown From tho head of a king. But to come latter down, There's Loot Napowlion, a grate man indeed, But they're nolhin' toyou,for they didn't secede. Ah, where kin I fiud out a match for you ? where ! If I don't hit itseon, I'll give up in dispair. I hare it—grate Davis, no fear of a libel In a counterpart for you—his name's in the Bible. The first ofseceders, I read it in skoo...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Later of the late battle In Missouri. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

Later of the late battle In Missouri. ROLLA., Mo., August 15.—We are indebted to the correspondent of the St. Lonis Democrat for tbe following intelligence : Mr. Graham a Union clerk in a secession store, reached here this morning. He re ports that four regiments of the rebel cavalry, unber Gen. Raines, entered Springfield Sunday noon, and hoisted a secession flag on the Court House, amidst ihe noisy demonstrations of troops and a few resident sympathizers. Our wounned soldiers in the hospital had not been molested,and it was announced that only the home guards would be the subjects of resentment. The rebels purchased everything in the stores, paying any price demanded in Confederate scrip. They were particularly anxious to get shoes, some of their regiments being entirely barefooted. Capt. Indest, one of Gen. Siegel's skirmishers, who was wounded in the battle, reports that Siegel's attack on the rear of the rebel camp was a complete surprise to them ; that they were driven...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
B^^£% _S% [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

B^^£% _S% Important from Europe—Foreign Opinion of the Bull Run Battle—The question ot Blockade—The QueVu's Speech. FARTBKR POINT, August 18.—The steam, ship "Bohemian." with Liverpool dales to the 3d inst, passed here this evening on her way to (Quebec. The steamships "City of Washington" and "Hiberian" arrived out on the 7*h instant* The "Edinburgh" took out three thousand, and the " Bremen," fifteen hundred pounds for New York. The London Times has another article bitterly sarcastic on the battle of Bull Run and says that there must arise gathering doubts that the Sonthern rust is too hard to crack, and that the military line, as t matter of business, will not answer.— The same article ridicules and laughs at the threats of the prominent New York journals against England. It fears that the question ot the blockade may involve England in some difficult complications. The Timet remarks that there is a lit» lie cloud which, although only as large as a man's hana, may overshado...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Rebel Account of the Late Battle In Missouri. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

Rebel Account of the Late Battle In Missouri. MEMPHIS, August 17.—Little Rock dispatches of the sixteenth says: McColloch's victory is fully confirmed. The fight occurred on Saturday, eight miles south of Springfield. The enemy took the Confederate pickets prisoners and surprised the main body. A bloody and desperate encounter ensued, with great loss on both sides. Five regiments of Missoti-* rians becoming panic struck, were thrown into disorder and fled. Price made two ineffectual attempts to rally them. The Louisiana regiment gallantly suffered mnch, Price led the First and Fifth Arkansas with splendid conrago. McColloch's letter of the eleventh says the victory was ours. The battle lasted six and a half hours. Our loss is great. Lyon is among the dead. We took six pieces of artillery from Siegel and destroyed his command, and took many prisoners and small arms. The Cisnfederate loss was from two to three hundred kiN led, and four lo five hundred wounded. Siegel's forces we...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Interesting Washington Items. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

Interesting Washington Items. WASHINGTON dry, August 19.—Our foreign relations attract the attention of'i the government at present. The Administration will, at all hazards, maintain its ri ght to close the rebel ports. The question is now under discussion between otir government and those of France and England, and it is believed that our rights will ba | freely conceded. The National Intelligencer of this morning has a theory that exminister Faulkner is probably not imprisoned because he intended to join the rebel | army, but that he is held as a hostage fur the safe return ot Congressman Ely and I Messrs. Magraw and Harris, non-combatants, who are uotv in the hands of the enemy. Capt. Gerhardt, of this city, who served under Gen. Siegel in Europe, is raising a coiripouy to jom a New York regiment.— The Congressional Investigation Committee, of which Mr. Potter is chairman, has made important discoveries, showing that traitors and spies daily frequent the depar ments ot the ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Important Instructions to Volunteer* about Mutitering Into Service. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

Important Instructions to Volunteer* about Mutitering Into Service. WASHINGTON , Aug. 20.—The following order was to-day issued from the Adjutant General's office. Officers who have not been mustered into service have power to enroll men. but are not competent to muster them under the provisions of the General Orders No. 58, of the current series lrom the VVar Department. In this case the muster must he made by some officer, either volunteer or regular, already in the service, and the oath must be administered by a civil magistrate or an officer in the regular army, probably the latter. In mustering companies the original muster-rolls will be retained at the company rendezvous, upon which the names of the members will be enrolled as they present themselves. As they are mustered they will be sent to the commanding officers of the eamps rendezvous with a des» cripvive list, staling the name, dale of enrollment and muster, and the regiment to which they belong, and whether they...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The Rebels Preparing to Attack Fortress Monroe. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

The Rebels Preparing to Attack Fortress Monroe. .FORTRESS MONROE, August 16.—Gen. Builer yesterday assumed the responsibility of paying to the New York Regiments about twenty thousand dollars, which had been deposited for some time at Old Point for want of a paymaster. The ship Fail-Wind, of Boston, with a cargo of guano, was this morning towed up the Roads bv the steamei S. R. Paulding, in a disabled condition. She ran ashore on Hog Island. The II. S. frigate Gladiator was yesterday cruising off the Capes. A flag of truce yesterday conveyed Mr. Wheeler, formerly U. S. Minister to Nicaragua, to the confederate pickets beyond New Market bridge. A flag of truce is just in from Norfolk with Corporal Harlbut, of> Connecticut regiment, a prisoner who was released by the rebels lor his attentions to Col. Gardiner after the battle of Bull Run. He states that a considerable number of released prisoners, including several chaplains, will reach Old Point tomorrow. In his opinion ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
| Plans of Johnston and Beauregard. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

| Plans of Johnston and Beauregard. I A good deal ot interest is beginning to ! be felt here, writes the Washington COT ~ respondent of the N. Y. Pott, in the plans of Johnston and Beauregard. There are some pretty strong indications of' an advance movement of the rebels, ah officer of Colonel Stone's column, frorn*an encampment near Edward's Ferry,*thirtyx ' miles north of this city, reports that the rebel troops are encamped in strong force on the Virginia side ot the river at or near the ford, and that they are constantly bringing up artillery. It is also a fact that unusual activity prevails among the rebels near Ac quia Creek, and several "contrabands" who have come into our camps report that the enemy is gathering boats and vessels up the Rappahannock for some purpose, and it is believed to be to convey troops into Maryland, If any movement is made at all upon Maryland it will doubtless be above and below Washington, but the nervous may be comforted by the authentic stat...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Washington Despatches to the Tribune. ber ot persons whom the police regulations are found to incommode, indicates how extensively this intercourse was carried on. The navy department has advices that commander Porter, of the St. Mary's, Pacific Squadron, whose letter avowing rebel sympathies to his father in Virginia, is in irons, according to orders, and will bejsent here soon; The trial of the mutineers of the 79th regiment will commence tosmorrow. The Constitution of the Court leads to the belief among officers that the sentences will be severe. They may, however, be mitigated by the Commanding General or President. Mr. Faulkner freely criticises the plans and movements ot his Southern friends, and expresses tbe opinion that they have attained no one of their cherished objects since the fall of Sumter. The question of the disposition of the rebel privateersmen has never been introduced into a Cabinet meeting, much less inharmoniously discussed there, as has been inventively allowed. Gen. Anderson dined with Gen. Scott today. Capt. Green, late Lieut. Green of the battery, recently appointed Assistant Adjutant General, is to be on his staff. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

Washington Despatches to the Tribune. ber ot persons whom the police regulations are found to incommode, indicates how extensively this intercourse was carried on. The navy department has advices that commander Porter, of the St. Mary's, Pacific Squadron, whose letter avowing rebel sympathies to his father in Virginia, is in irons, according to orders, and will bejsent here soon; The trial of the mutineers of the 79th regiment will commence tosmorrow. The Constitution of the Court leads to the belief among officers that the sentences will be severe. They may, however, be mitigated by the Commanding General or President. Mr. Faulkner freely criticises the plans and movements ot his Southern friends, and expresses tbe opinion that they have attained no one of their cherished objects since the fall of Sumter. The question of the disposition of the rebel privateersmen has never been introduced into a Cabinet meeting, much less inharmoniously discussed there, as has been inventively ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
rQOY. OORTIIPS PROCLAMATION. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

rQOY. OORTIIPS PROCLAMATION. HARRISBURG, August 20—Pennsylvania, SS.: In the name and by the authority of the Commonwealth ot Pennsylvania, Andrew G. Curtin, Governor of the said Commonwealth, issues a proclamation to the freemen of the Commonwealth of Pennsyl vania : "Washington is again believed to be in danger. The President has made an earnest appeal for all the men that can be furnished to be sent forward without delay.— If Pennsylvania now pots forth her strength, the hordes ot hungry rebels may be swept down to the latitude where they belong. If she falters, tbe seat of tumult, disorder and rapine may be transferred to her own soil. Let every man so act that he will not be ashamed to look at his mother, his wife or his sisters. In this emergency it devolves upon me to call up* on all .commanders of companies to report immediately to the headquarters ot the Commonwealth at Harrisburg, that means may be provided for their immediate transportation, with the men under the...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Martial law at.St. I.otiis. i [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

Martial law at.St. I.otiis. i ST. Louis, Aug. 11.—The following Proclamation has just been issued b y Major General Fremont: "H EAD-QUARTERS, WESTERN DEPARTM'T, ) ST. LOUIS, August 14, 18til. ) I hereby declare and establish martial law in the city and county of St. Louis, i Major J. McKinstry, United States Army, is appointed Provost Marshal. All orders and regulations issued by him will be respected and obeyed accordingly. •Signed, J.C.FREMONT, Major General Qommanding."

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
News from tbe Northern States. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

News from tbe Northern States. INDIANA — What the State has done.—The Indianapolis Journal of August 3d, says: "Indiana has equipped and sent into the field thirteen regiments of infantry and two companies ot cavalry. Two regiments ot infantry are now ready to march, and an entire regiment of cavalry will be ready in a short time.- Seventeen additional regiments of infantry are now forming, and will be put into the service as speedily as possible. This will make thirty-three regiments raised and to be raised in Indiana—a force of about 36,000 men, including three^artillery companies now about ready tor active service. This is over 3000 men for each Congressional District, or jhout eviiiy fortieth person in the Slate." The 19th Indiana regiment passed through Philadelphia, on August 8th, en route lor the seat of war.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
BUMI'I better After tbe Buttle or Ball **¦ Run. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

BUMI'I better After tbe Buttle or Ball **¦ Run. NEW Y ORK, August 19—The steamer Bremen, which arrived here, brings the London "Times," containing Mr. Russell's letter describing the result at Bull Run. He says:—"The repulse of the Fude ' ralists , decided *>s it was, might have had no serious effects whatever, beyond that of the mere feilure itself, which, polit-• ,.*UT/ was of greater consequence than it ^CSalAxf sense, but for the dis- graceful conduct of the troops. The retreat on their lines at Centreville seems to have ended in a cowardly rout; a miserable, causeless panic. Such scandalous behaviour on tbe part of the soldiers I should have considered impossible, as with some experience ot *^pvps and armies, 1 have never even among camp followers seen the like of it. "On the Potomac, above Washington, the Capitol might tall into their hands.— Delay may place that event out of the range of probability. The Nonh will no doubt recover from the shock—hitherto she ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Important Action at the Wheeling Convention— A Division of tbe State Decided On. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

Important Action at the Wheeling Convention— A Division of tbe State Decided On. The Wheeling Convention, whioti has been in session lor several days, passed an ordinance, yesterday, for the division ot the State, by a vote fitly to twenty-eight. The boundaries ot the new State, as fixed by the ordinance, includes the counties of Logan, Wyoming, Raleigh, Fayette, Nicholas, Webster. Randolph, Tucker, Preston, Monongalia, 'Macon, Tayior, Barbour, Upshur, Harrison, Lewis, Braxtou, Clay, Kanawha, Boone, Wayne, Cabell, Putnam, Mason, Jackson, Roane, Calhoun, Wirt, Gilmer, Ritchie, Wood, Pleasants, Tyler, Doddridge, We'.zell, Marsahall, Ohio, Brooke, and Hancock. A provision wss incorporated permitling certain adjoining counties to come in if they desire, by the expression of a majority to do so. The ordinance also provides for lhe election of delegates to a convention to form a Constitution. At the same time the question for a new State or against a new State shall be submitted to ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
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