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Elephind.com contains 44,014 items from American Presbyterian, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

HOW A CONGRESSIONAL CHAPLAIN WAS ELECTED. \ the river was low—fogs came on. Sunday morning arrived; we were yet eighty miles below Wheeling, and there was no pladfe .where we could land to spend the _JSaBbath. At breakfast-time a committee of the passengers waited upon me to know if I would preach to them. Never did* I say yes more gladly; for never had I Been so anxious to speak my laind. A congregation of nearly three hundred persons asseriibled at-half-past ten o'clock, and I took my staridv betwee,n th.e ladies' arid gentlemen's cabins. Seated itf the places of honor upon my right and left hand were most of r _iiy late objects of interest-—the" members of Congress. I hadnever before spoken under such circumstances, butj nevertheless, preached as well*as I could, which is riot saying _i\ueh. At the close of the discourse proper, however, I could not resist the impulse to speak' a straightforward word to the men on riiy right and "left j turning to them, therefore, I said someth...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

_»i » * ii D'AUBIGHIE O_^_T _PHYSICAL _IHlNOlEEirA m TEE IEISH EEP_^AL. . The eminent historian of the Reformation is not , disposed to distrust the great jeyiyal in Ireland, because of the bodily influencesi by which it is often _atterideo! pis Iai_^g_4 observation hastftught him, that the sympathy between the huirian Ibody and spirit is so intimate, that a powerful influenee operating on the one makes its presence felt in the pther. At the recent opening of the Theological school in Geneva, Dr. D'Aubigne delivered an .address on thev general.need of a revival in oar age, and discussed at length the nature and effects of the great worlran Ireland. We give an extract from the address, found ia the News of the Churches: "We would ask," he said , "the adversaries of this movement if it is surprising that a strong emotion of <the mind should also act upon the bodv? Are, then, these two parts of man two separate tteingsr Are tbey not, on the contrary, most intimately united ?...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

. j ¦ _ . . _ _» ?¦» _: . A WOBK FOB TEE _JTEW YEAE. For a long time past we have earnestly desired to call the attention of the churches throughout the land to a great arid important work to be performed for the advancement of the kingdom of Christ and the salvation of men. In going out of the city and attending public worship on the Sabbath, especially in country places, we have repeatedly been strue .k with the stualiness of the number seen in the house of God, compared with the large population which surround it. In many places may be seen a comparatively small, and even with that a half-filled church, while the country around teems with people. It is trul y deplorable to see the multitudes who are practically turning their backs upon the means ot" grace and uDOn the Saviour, while in riiany places, at least, * here is abundant room for them in the sanctuary. In many of the cities the work has not only been undertaken , but it has jbeen accomplished to a great extent. This c...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

6BEASIKG THE _WHIlIiS A few mornings since, as I was iri one of the city_;Cars, a son of the Emerald Isle; eritered and toqki ayacanfc seat by myside _^ and presently asked sme if he would be in time to mail a letter by the steamer _ihsit was to leave that day. I answered his* _question in a mariner which probably ericouirag6dVilj_^i_^t6 ask_^ kriother-j and we_^_SO jOttJMlsirito _^_onyersMo_^i _^pottihiaaativSelian_^_, the * Irish Eevival,.|and other matters in which he seemed to be interested. As we were passing a _certain street he pointed to the depot of one of the omnibus companies and said, "I worked there three years before going where I now am; I had to be up every night; I greased the wheels of the omnibusses; and you _^ know," he, added, "it is yerj needful that the wheels stioiild, be greased." He said this riot as if he thought he was the most important man m the _esfablishmept, but with such an evident sense of his respQnsibility and of the importance of his humbl...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

COWPIB'S COH7_EKSIOHT. Gowper was one of those gentle and lovely spirits, after his conversion, the fragrance of whose good name lives long upon the earth. Yet, he was once in a fair way to lose his soul. He was thoughtless and skeptical, and, like Gallio, "cared for none of these things." : He was one of those persons whom it is difficult to approach upon the subject of reli gion—a young man upon whom most Christians look with little ho.pe. A student of human nature might have approached him with success, hut others would have failed in every attempt to priess the _cMmfcdf religion upon his mind. -He moved in a . circle of the gay and worldly, which is usually environed with prejudice and practical infidelity. The close tie that united him to godless companions was enough to cause Christians to look upon him hopelessly. One of these soeial bonds is frequently stronger than avowed opposition, to stand up against religious appeals. Few, then, seem to be in.greater moral peril than ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

THE HAPPY CHRISTIAN _Tliere are some Christians, whose ascetic course deprives them of much of the enjoyment which , as followers of Christ, they might otherwise have. They _IdoTcand act as though, in the reading of the Bible, that passage had entirely escaped tlieir notice, wbichsays, "Bejoice, and be exceeding glad; for great is your reward in heaven." These dismal Christians, by their rigid course, deprive themselves of much of the ^' pleasure by the way," and so far ftom proving themselves-heavenly-niinded,;prove themselves quite the _' eontrary, to our minds; for where, in all that we read of heaven, is there any _evideace of its adaptation to this austere professor?. Heaven is a place of joy. Why, Christian bfother—-you whose head is like ;the bulrush, always bowed down, did you ever think there was joy in heaven when you felt the power of redeeming blood? Think of the hundreds who are daily experiencing the joys of pardoning mercy, thus causing a. continual chorus of jo...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

* JTVE MIinriES TOO PAST. Some people are accustomed to keep their watches five or ten minutes too fast, especially when they are dependent upon the cars for conveyance. " Your clock is too fast," we said to a Boston merchant. " Yes," «he replied, "I go out every day, and I keep it a little fast that I may not be behind the cars." We have thought of this reply many- times since, and finally have come to the conclusion that men whotkeep their watches five minutes too fast are laboring under a strong delusion. What does one of this class gain by it ? He understands very well that his watch is too _fasj, so that if he needs five minutes more at his counter with a customer, he will not hesitate to take it. Knowing that he can reach the ears in m_%?, . son, he is tempted to stay to the time he woul3_*f if his watch were exactly right. What, then,. _^ does he gain? If Re did not know that his watch" was in advance of the true time, then he Jaight be aided by keeping it five minutes too ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

MISXAiSJSS. 1. It is a mistake for a pastor to suppose that he can have his people take an interest in the religious movements of the day, without having a religious newspaper circulated _amoMj them. 2. It is a mistake for a pastor to suppose that his people' can be acquainted with the progress and wants of his own denomination, and contribute liberally to the support of its institutions, unless they are readers of a newspaper devoted especially to the interests of that branch of the Christian Church. 3. It is a nvistake for any one to suppose, that he can, by the sanie expenditure in any other way, br ing as much religious information before his family, as by subscribing and paying for a well conducted religious newspaper. 4. It is a mistake for a man to begin to practise economy by stopping his religious newspaper. To do this is to deprive himself and family of»; great benefit. ¦;._'., 5. It, is a mistake for any one to suppose that a newspaper can be made exactly what every one...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

For the American Presbyterian. Mil IS MP A ILOWEB. BY J. B. _JIOKSFALI,. In yon sweet vale, but"yesterday, There bloomed a fragrant flower, Surpassing alt that e'er 1 saw, * Itt wood Or garden bower. _lty# sought it la the vale to-day, But oh! Ifotimlittiotj The blooming flower of yesterday Has met Its destined lot. _. Alas! just so is human life,— Uncertain and unknown) A spirit may be here to-day, To-morrow may Have flows. _" Such was the fate of one I knew, She bloomed but for an hour; When death's untimely blast was blown, She withered like the flower. ¦»??

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

UNION OF CHRISTIANS. It is one of the _practical fruits of the revival spirit, that Christians learn to forget _^ for the time, their non-essential differences and sectarian feeling, and mingle together with one heart and voice in the exercise of prayer and praise, and in common efforts for the extension of the kingdom of Christ. They do not repudiate or disband their own households, but _> while faithful to their separate organizations and to their distinctive principles, they recognise all their separate families as constituting one body in Christ Jesus, unitedly laboring for the same glorious end, the glory of the Redeemer and the salvation of, men. This union ¦ spirit is illustrated in the following statements of the course pursued by the Church of En_^_Ignd towards the other clergy of the kingdomSi_^^_heif assemblies for prayer. The _following_^_fecpunt of the manner of conducting the union prayer-meeting appears in a London paper: Arrangements having been made for a...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

THE FTTBITAHS. The providence of God is signally displayed In the history of the early settlers of oar country, and in the preparatory training through which they were made to pass. We can never, in view of the circumstances under which they were developed and schooled, wonder at their indomitable spirit, their love of freedom, and their unceasing activity and persevering energy. Born in the midst of excitements_; agitation, activity and progress, have been the elements in which they have lived and thrived. The Lord never designed them for conservatives, in the stand-still sense of that term: they were _raised up for action and mighty achievements. Systems of religion and government were to be overturned and changed, and new institutions established,which should embody the principles of freedom, and exemplify the spirit of Christianity. Snch an undertaking required bold and courageous men —men wedded to truth and principle, and trained to endurance. It is wonderful to observ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

. • ¦ -»»* . EDITOR'S TABLE. AN OVERLAND JOURNEY FROM NEW YORK TO SAN FRANCISCO, in the summer of 1859. By Hobace _Greelet. New York: C.; M. Saxton, Barker & Co. ' ¦¦ . Philadelphia: G. 6. Evans. Horace Greeley, the distinguished editor of the New York Tribune, made during the summer of 1859, an over-land tour to California, through Kansas, Utah and Sierra Nevada. His letters, written during the journey, were published in the Tribune , and extensively copied into other papers. They are here collected, and publishedin a volume of nearly four hundred pages. No iherit is claimed for the book as embodying valuable scientific and geographical observations , but as a book of incidents of travel and descriptions of scenery in a sparsely inhabited wilderness, and In mountainous regions soon to be subdued and peopled, It will attract attention, and will receive a passing interest. It is well worth a careful perusal, both for its instruction and amusement. - _, r HISTORY OF PETER, T...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

DE. POMKOY. We publish the following statement at the request of Dr. Potnroy, that the public may judge of his case in the light of his own confessions and asseverations: TO THE CHRISTIAN _PUBMC. V The following statement of facts and personal feelings, deemed to be due both to myself and the Christian public, has been delayed till the present time, that I might be able to spej_^k with more calmness and self-possession. Many things have been said, inferred, surmised and taken for granted ; some correctly, others not so; But I have never authorized the publication of any statement which may have appeared respecting the offence which has been alleged against me. It is perhaps proper to say, that considerable portions of this communication were sent, some days since, to the church pf which I am a member. Details will neither be expected nor desired. I have admitted, and do now _^admit, that there were three instances in which I was made a victim; and that, whether foolishly or ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

THE SUCCESS OF FOREIGH MISSIONS* Many out of the church, and not a few in the church, seem to suppose that nothing has been accomplished and that nothing ever will be accomplished by efforts to spread Christianity in foreign countries. Such impressions, however, can be cherished only where there is want of faith in the word of God, and want of information respecting the history of the church and the history of European civilization. It is enough to remark that, in the middle of the first century of the present era, Christianity was confined to a narrow strip of land forming the south-eastern border of the Mediterranean Sea; and but a few hundreds in that land were its professed votaries. In all the world beside, other religions prevailed. Not a soul within the boundaries of Europe had yet called on the name of Jesus. But to-day, as we examine the statistics of the world, about one-fourth of its population is ranked under the name of Christian. We do not, indeed, say, that all th...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

CALVINISM EESTEICTED. Our Methodist brethren in opposing Calvinism are prone to define and restrict it, so as to embrace but a small portion of those who claim to adopt the views generally known as Calvinistic. The ultra opinion Of a few should not be made the standard by which to measure and judge the large communityof Calvinistic believers. Much of controversy is thus wasted in contending with sentiments which are not held by those against whom the controversy is waged. To. state correctly the views and opinions of those from whom we differ, would wonderfully narrow the actual field of controversy. Infant damnation and a limited atonement are often charged upon Calvinism, when in truth they form no part of the system, and are held by comparatively few who adopt the Calvinistic creed. A Methodist paper in Cincinnati is endeavoring to impress its readers that such are the approved views of all Calvinists. The Watchman arid Reflector, of Boston, justly reproves the writer for thus ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

WHAT A _BOSTONIAir THINKS OE PHILA DELEEIA. The last GongregationaUst has a letter frjom a _Bostgnian written from this city. It seems he found no eastern light among our Christian young men, which led him to judge that we were all looking southward. We extract part of the letter; it may contain a useful hint:— "This (Philadelphia) is really a Southern city. The New York papers are found here; but a Boston paper is a *rara avis.l In the 'Young Men's Christian Association,' one oi the largest societies in the city, I inquired for a Boston paper. I was told that they had none; they had formerly had the Gongregationalist, but it had ceased to come, and now, not a Boston paper, religious or secular, daily or weekly, is to be found there. This might not seem so strange, were it not for the fact that the same Association is in the daily or weekly receipt of at least fifty Southern papers, from such cities as Baltimore, Washington, Richmond, New Orleaus, and the like, down to the org...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

"ANNALS 0E THE _POOE." death; Yes, he whose case I mentioned under the title "The way they die," now sleeps in the dust. «« The wintry storm that hurries by, No more disturbs his deep repose; Than summer evening' s latest sigh That shoots the rose-5 ' The storms of life can no more disturb him, for they are all over y and may the turf be green above his now lifeless form. I tried my best to point him to the " Lamb pf God that taketh away the sins of the world." I followed him to his last restingplace, and oh! how vividly did that " Life and immortality brought to light in the gospel" seem to flash all around. And now, she who watched over him so tenderly, so faithfully and with a true woman's heart —she who " did what she could/' she whose husband and child sleep together, is left to travel life's rugged road alone. How she shall succeed may " depend very much upon some "Good Samaritan." - A PRAYER MEETING. On Wednesday evening, the second prayer meeting was held in the school...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

CHUECH EXTENSION COMMITTEE, HELP FOR MISSOURI. The Rev. T. Hill, secretary of the Missouri Home Missionary Society and exploring agent of the Church Extension Committee for that State,1 was recently requested by that Society to visit the East and confer with the friends of our church in relation to the missionary work in Missouri. He made statements to the Church Extension Committee at their recent meeting, whieh were of much interest, and after full consideration the Committee voted unanimously " that they deeply sympathize with our Missouri brethren, and that it is their opinion that not less than $2500 would be appropriated to the Churches in that State during the year ending December 31st, 1860, provided the Churches will furnish the Committee with the meaps of doing so; it being understood that on&hajf pf this sum is expecte<| t<? be _rajse4 by the Churches in Missouri." ¦ '" . ' . ' We think that this constitutes an appeal of no ordinary power. Here...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

D. C. HOUGHTON, _1DIT0E. ASSOCIATED WITH ALBERT BARNES , THOMAS BRAINERD, HENRY DARLING, [ _GEOHGE DUFFIELD_, Jb. JOHN JENKINS, • THOMAS SHEPHERD.

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

The very oldest person in Boston, a negro woman named Catherine Boston, familiarly known for many years as "Old Mother Boston," died at the age of one hundred and eleven years! ,Fpr several years she has been feeble, though some of her .faculties have been keen- and responsive as. in her younger .days. She was esteemed by the several generations who knewber._^ ._^U-r _^i -.u:-y -: -..-•v?»»W.-_*-r-j_^->V <'. ' ' . ' ¦ _', ¦ Oliver Howe, of: Lyme, N. H., Is supposed;to have left for California in theJast steamer from New York, leaving behind him forged "paper to the amount of eight or ten thousand _^ dollars, on which be realized the cash. Several of-the business ._anen of Groton, Mass., and the Lancaster, Townserid and one of 5 the Fitchburg banks, also the Bradford (Vfc) Bank, are among the sufferers. -Two hundred and seventeen deaths occurred in this city last week, an increase of twenty-nine over the week previous. The reception of Bishop*p Odenheimer, of N...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
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