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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1893

The Indian Advocate Devoted to the Interests of Indian Missions. Vol. V. AUGUST 1893. No. 4. Very Rev. Thomas Duperon Silver Jubilee. June 6, 18681893. On tho eve of the sixth of Juno, from distant mission posts in the twin-territories, were gathered tho priests of Sa cred Heart Mission to assist at their spiritual father's silvor jubilee. When evening came, grave and rev erent fathers, modest looking Alumni, brigh-faced, though dusky, students from, tho college, black-robod sisters with their gay pupils, assembled to give greeting to the Jubilarian. Music and speeches were the rights of the evening. Gifts were presented and happy thoughts given utterance. Rev. Provost Savinian with a few appropri ate words presented a magnificent chalice, the offering of the Jubilarian's spiritual sons. An address by one of tho Alumni was most touching. The young student dwelt lovingly upon "The life of self sacrifice devoted to the glory of God and the salvation of souls." The quiet power with whi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1893

68 TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE'. country, ho was preceded by six Indian boys arrayed in gorgeous garments; the path was a bower of flowers, on either side trees and flowering shrubs waved the foliage in the breeze, roses scattered by young Indian hands covered the ground." The procession was grand; the many bells rang out peal after peal; the deep sonorous voices of the monks chanting the Magnificat gave an old World air to the scene. Nearing the church the voices ceased and a burst of melody came from the interior. The triumphant march rolled grandly in the dear church. Love had made the Sa cred Heart band surpass all expecta tions. Up the aisles moved the clergy, all eyes turned towards the glittering High Altar. Flo'wers of fairest hue and sweetest fragance raised their grace ful heads, lights glimmered among the foliage. The church was a bit of earthly paradise a tribute to the Supreme and his faithful servant. Mottoes in beau tiful work attracted the eye. The as sistants of the celebra...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 63 PATIENCE. If your life be weary, Do not fret;. If your day bo dreary, Do not regret. Pain does not last for long; Just bear up and bo strong", There will be sunshine yet. Through all your lonely years, Only try To banish care and fears; Iok on high, For God's own mighty arm Will shield you from all harm Ho hears His children's cry. And when you are quite brave, And can bear Aflliction's mighty wave Without care, Then in God's own good time Perchance in your life's prime Will come a season fair. Press on, bo not afraid; Do not grieve; Be brave; be undismayed; And believe; When you have learned to wait, You shall, e'en tho' it be late, Your heart's desire receive. AN INDIAN MARRIAGE. WITH A MORAL. Some two years ago, when the writer had charge of the Osage Mission, In dian Territory, the chief, Charley Mash onkaske, a full blood Osage Indian, came to him to arrange the prelimina ries to the marriage of his daughtor, a sweet girl of sixteen who had been two" yea...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1893

64. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. As howoyor this pandemonium does not bring the elected bridegroom, the two check their appeals, dry their tears, rearrange their plumage and soon the bride emerges from the tent arrayed in all the gorgeous splendor of the most barbaric taste. Every article of her apparel, petticoats, skirt, leggins, moc casins are embroidered with bead work, very showy if not very elegant. On her shoulders is a rich blanke' , fringed with little silver bells; on hei head an immense stove-pipe hat, covered with silver paper and surmounted by three big plumes. The bride's father in gala costume appears now, holding a loaded gun, but he is not going to kill any body. Her mother holds a horse richly caparisoned for the young amazon to mount. In the meanwhile, her friends and relatives dispose themselves in a long line across the prairie, about five hun dred feet from the fair or rather dusky rider; all on foot and in an attitude of breathless expectations, as if waiting for a si...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 65 it saddened mo and a feeling of revul sion and disgust succeeded. And those feelings I have always oxporionced whenovor I have witnessed some Indian ceremony, whothcr marriage, funeral, dance or council. Hero are men and women who differ indeed very little from their children; rational beings whose intellect has been kept in a stag nant condition. Who is to blame for this? The Government? Well I should answer yes and no at least not the Government alone, but the Nation at largo; for the Nation in this glorious republic makes the Government and shapes the course of its administration, more so perhaps in Indian affairs than in any other branch of its business. It has always been the constant poli cy of this Nation to keep the Indians on the move, always pushing them on the outskirts of our civilized communi ties, always disturbing them whenever they have made some kind of a start in agriculture always clamoring, agita ting and scheming for legislation and admin...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1893

66 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. reclaimed child of the forest with the unreclaimed child of the slums;, the painted brave on the warpath with the smooth and polite scoundrel of our so ciety; and you will find very little cause to feel over-proud at the comparison. You will discover some redeeming feat ures in the Indian's moral physiognomy where none exists in his white brother. Therefore it is a ca?e of Mcdicc, euro, teipsum. Before such a society can cope with difficulties of the Indian problem, it will have to do something in its own behalf. jpacs. THE ABBOT'S BREAD. It happened all so very long ago This sweet old legend of an ancient time, 1 fain would pluck it from forgotten dust, And let it bloom anew 'within my ryhme. In a fair valley once a famine came; For five long months no drop of rain fell there, And with the famine came a dreadful plague "Which with its poison filled the heated air. First little children and the feeble died; Then strong men perished, stricken as they fled, And...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1893

TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 67 Indians drosssd in tawdy finery, loung ed around the door. Don Jesse Seno, the interpreter, ren dered her evidence into English for the court and jury. On being sworn, and sho understood the obligation well, she refused to testify, though urged to do so. When asked her reason for refusing sho said that her faith taught her to forgive all her enemies, that she forgave the prisoner and could not swear against him. On being assured that it was not a violation of her obligations as a Catho lic, and being ordered to testify by the judge, she reluctantly proceeded to do so. When she had concluded she arose, and raising her long bonny hand, she exclaimed in a voice tremulous with emotion; "Juan, you killed my boy, but God says I must forgive you, and I do. I obey his will!" As she stepped down from the stand a 'dead silence reigned throughout the court, and I could not help thinking that the good Padre who sat among the Indian children, must have felt that his teach...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1893

68 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. His father often whipped him for it. He told him, among other things, that if ho made any more versos he would flog him within an inch of his life. The boy, however, kept on making ver ses, and his father kept his word and thrashed him till ho cried out: "Oh father! father pity on mo take, And never more shall I verses make." B. Oh! say Jack, wouldn't it be funny if you and I turned out to be two poets? We might be taken up by the President and get a pension. A. Yes, we might be taken up and get a sentence, or put in a lunatic asy lum; still it is possible wo might bocome poets, for you see that "Dryden was a poet, 'Though he didn't know it." B. Say, Jack, I am getting tired of your poetry. A. So am I getting tired of yours; let's give it a rest, and change the sub ject. "Well, what next? B. Oh! anything talk about the weather if you don't know anything else to speak about. A. Allright, but there is not much to be said about, only that 'tis terrible hot and e...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1893

TJSE IFDMN ADVOCATE. 69 was, for I bot it was hot enough oven there. A. Friond, you know scientists,, though thoy always claim to bo right, are constantly making calculations and corrections, and porhaps they will put it back again. B. Oh! you're coming in with your chostnuts again, you want to have re venge well you are older and longer at school than I am, but wait till I get on the war-path of study. A. I hope to soon see you far ad vanced on that path, especially if it be that of Christian science; for we must not forget that wo are both "Christian Soldiers. " Good-byo. ST. PATRICK'S MISSION. "Backward, turn backward, 0 Time on thy way And let us live o'er again only one day." For the day spent at St. Patrick's Mission abovo all others remains green in our memory. It was our good fortune to receive from the Kov. Father I. Rioklin, 0. S. B, an invitation to visit St. Patrick's Mis sion at Anadarko, Okla. Ter.; and last Saturday wo accepted it, though the clouds looked dark and dr...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1893

70 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. common affairs. I noticed several that morning in the beautiful dormitory of the Mission, shinning under the polish ing just received, and I felt that if over my wife and I have tho happiness to enjoy a tin wedding, I will thank some friend to remember a granite wash bowl and pitcher. At about nine in the morning, tho real objects (the Indians) for which the' Mission was established commenced to appear from all directions. From every hill and valley, in every style and way; appareled in all tho colors of the rain bow, camo tho Indians, old and young, large and small, from tho beautiful "papoose" to the bowed, broken and wrinkled warrior of savage days, and long before the hour of Mass the little Mission's yards were full. Father Isidore was in his glory as ho wended his way among tho huge and ugly "bucks" in his cassock, with a happy smile, a hearty shake, and a jolly word for all, he seemed in the seventh heaven and entirely ignorant of the fact that he was ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 71 ago, traveling in an old "hack" with a canvas top; a cracker box with the lid secured by a strap for his larder, whose sole stock was biscuits and bacon and a can of salmon for Friday; a double blanket and a shabby overcoat formed his wardrobo; traveling alone from cairip to camp, teaching the Indians the knowledge of a living God, and win ning their confidence and affection by his constant care. In due time Mother Mary Catherine Droxel came to his rescue, and once more that noblo woman, who is now the pride of every Catholic, came to the front. First came funds for a parson age, and shortly after money to build the Mission. Through the assistance of Rt. Rev. Bishop Moorscheart, Mother Mary Agnes, Superior General of the Franciscan Sisters of Philadelphia, was induced to take the Mission School un der her "charge, and since that time, Father Isidore, the Indians and every body else have blessed her for her dis cretion in choosing the sisters to con duct this ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1893

7 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Ilje Indian SdVocatc Is a Rovlow, published by the Benedictine Fathers of tho Indian Territory, to plead tho cause of tho last remnants of the Indian tribes, and to give a history of their progress toward civilization. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of each tribe ; their progress in education and religion ; their occupa tions, industries, schools, etc., etc. Also, a history of our mis sions, statistics, and other interesting matter that can not bo found in any other publication. . Tho proceeds of this Review will bo used for educating and converting tho Indians of the Territory. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, Sacred Heart Post Office, Oklahoma Territory. Approved by Right Rev. THEO. MEERSCHAERT, Vicau Apostolic of Oklahoma and Indian Tkrmtoky. Subsqrijitiona BO Cents per Ycfir. Single Copies 15 Cents. OCTOBER 1893. EDITORIAL AND LOCAL. Our warmest thanks and heartfelt gratitude to the generous Rector of St. Theresa's Parish, New Orleans, for tho r...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1893

TE3 INDIAN ADVOCATE. 7$ scription prico of this pa)or is but fifty cents a yoar and yet many of your friends find it too high! Was tho fare to Chicago not somewhat higher? And do wo forgot tho great purpose of Co lumbus? The conversion of tho abo Duty without piety is meat without salt, but piety without duty is salt with out meat. Lot gluttons look at it. Anon. On the beautiful feast of tho Assump tion was witnessed one of those beau tiful ceremonies which invariably sends a thrill of piety and devotion to tho heart. At tho Convent of the Imma culate Heart of Mary, Sacred Heart, Oklahoma Territory, three young nov ices, of the Sisters of Mercy made their religious profession, Sister M. Evange list, Sister M. Vincent and Sister M. Camillus. The Rt. R6v. Bishop Meer choart being absent, the lit. Rev. Abbot D. Augustine Bastre, of Our Lady of Bollac, Franco, kindly officiated, assist ed by the Very Rev. Prior D. Thomas Duperon, who spoke very touchingly on the happiness of the religio...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1893

n TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. tea to bo comforted, some one in trouble to be cheered and brightened with a smile. And we need to ask God to give us strength to fulfill all these duties, and to make us quick to see where we may do a kind action, or speak a cheer ing word. Ah let us think of all these things, and we shall soon see that if there be need to commit ourself to God's care at night, there is still greater need to go down on our knees in the morning, and ask God, the Holy Virgin Mary and our guardian angel to take care of us, and to be with us during the day. And what we ask shall be given us. We shall bo kept from evil, and our lives shall be peaceful and happy. David said, "My voice shalt Thou hear in the morning, 0 Lord ; in the morning will I direct my prayer unto Thee, and will look up." And we read of our Lord Himself, when upon earth, that He rose early in the morning, a long time before the break of day, to pray to His Father in heaven. Whether little folks or big folks, we...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 75 to reach thorn before the sleeping soldiers could overtake them. It was a wild raco across the ice and snow. Many of the Indians were barefooted and loft a trail of blood. Encumbered with their women and children, they made slow progress. The garrison, aroused by the shots that destroyed the guards, were soon in pursuit. Captain Wossel, of the 3d Cavalry, was in command. They came upon the Indians in a little ravine, or coolie, about two miles north of the fort. They made a stand and fought bravely, but were without arms and the rifles of the cavalry made short work of them. After the soldiers had exhausted all their ammunition there wore yet a few live Indians, and these Were charged upon and cut down with the sword. Wild Hog's tribe was en tirely wiped out. Not a man, woman or child was loft of the entire band. But Wild Hog was safely locked up in the guard house at Fort Robinson, and that is how ho comes to survive a chief without a tribe. GOOD WORDS. Some...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1893

T 76 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. b , Tt- l death during .tho war who know their danger, yet had no thought of tho next world. I have seen men dio in the hospitals who never uttered a prayer. The habit of devotion had not boon formed in tho family circle. At home tho strong links of habit should bo forged. HABIT USEFUL IN OLD AGE. Tho soul of a worldly person suffers from the approach of old ago, his mem ory and reason grow weaker, ill temper and caprice and very often aversion and envy appear. Under those con ditions, age generally appears unlovely. Through tho habit of religion it is in tho power of age to keep tho soul ever young and fresh by uniting it always intimately with him who never grows old. A pious old ago is as vonorable as it is beautiful. A COMFORT AT LAST, The habit of devotion formed in youth, and extending to tho final hour, thus linking the cradle to the grave, furnishes a powerful support and con solation to the parting soul. Wo read (James 4, 8), "Draw nigh to God and ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 77 it aro apt to continue and to increase in baleful influence Yet, in most cases they need only to bo understood for their evil influence to bo checked. Whoro evil reports aro thus carried be tweon friends, the only safety is for thorn to promptly soo each other, when all will probably bo explained, and the work of the mischief-maker para lyzed. Once ho is found out, it only remains to give him a wide berth He is simply a nuisance to be avoided; for once a person is affected by this influence, the propensity is over after to be suspected. And all reports from such a source aro to be doubted. Parents should carefully watcli against this propensity in childron. A tale bearing child has the first elements of a mischief-maker. If this propensity is tolerated it goes beyond the mero reporting of wrong and feeds on imag inary evils. It should be rigidly re pressed. Also, if a child has a buoyant imagination, which induces it to color or exaggerate, it should be broug...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1893

78 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. THE LAND OF SAINTS AND DEHONS. An English Catholic clergyman is credited with saying that France was the land of saints and demons. To use a colloquial expression "this fills the bill" pretty well. For the last twenty years the demons have been given free rein, and they have made good use of their opportunities. The name of God is excluded from all acts connected with public affairs; religion is banished from all schools supported by the government; many of the re ligious orders have been banished; the Sisters of Charity have been driven from the hospitals; all the young can didates for the priesthood are subjected to military service; the government is trying to ruin the religious houses by oppressive and unjust taxes; in fine, nothing that could possibly be injurious to the Catholic Church has been omit ted. This seems ominous and many have become despondent. It looks somewhat as if the cause of the Church was lost and that the future was a blank. That migh...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 79 TJe ;igel oPpUrgatory. HOW MANY SWEET REMINISCENCES TI1I8 TITLE It EC A 1,1,8 TO A CHRISTIAN MIND. The Message of the November Winds Wailing winds, what arc ye Haying? Are ye the voice of dead ones prwying Praying and calling for release From the pangs of atonement? for heaven's sweet peace? List! there is one ! 'Tis a voice I know Of a loved friend gone ! Aye, long ago She left this earth where sorrow is rife E'er its bitterness blighted her pure young life. Another murmurs "Oh pray for mo!" Dear soul departed I long to see Your loved face now as vour mournful cry Uplifts a veil from the Jays gone by. And I, a woman, all bent with years, Can scarce suppress the blinding tears That drop to this sheet as I try to write The mem'ries ye winds awake to-night. I breathe a prayer as each plaintive crv Steals thro' the leaves of the trees hard by, God grant your suffering soon may cease That each troubled soul may rest in peace ! DOM ALOYSIUS HERMAN, O. S. B. On the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1893

80 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. w and very soon ho was at the hood of his class, But his happiest day was, as it should be, the day of his first Com munion. Ho had been amongst the chosen few that were selected by the Pastor on account of their fitness, to be numbered amongst the invited to the banquet of the Lord. He under stood better than most boys of his age the importance of the first Communion and accordingly, prepared himself for so great an event with redoubled efforts and with renewed fervor; and when the Lord at last did come and His divine eyes were gladdened by the spotless beauty of the wedding gar ment, we must not be surprised to know that it was the brightest day of all the fair season of his earthly sojourn. An -interior voice, no doubt, whispered to him then, and in repeat ing echoes' ever after, that his life, like that of young Samuel was to be unre servedly consecrated to the Lord. This was the first call to the spirit ual life. Let us, nevertheless, confess that his fi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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