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Title: Red Lake News Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 182 items from Red Lake News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Red Lake news. — 15 November 1915

VOLUME 4. to 1 tflfe)** T-t- *w RED LAKE BOYS AT HASKELL. In a letter written from Haskell Ins+i stute, Lawrence, Kansas, Nov. 11, 1915, Ben Little Creek, of this reservation, writes that he is well and he recites some interesting .details of his trip from Red Lake, in com pany with Ben Brown, to Lawrence, Ken where they have enrolled for a {J'reeiear term at Haskell. His letter, in part, follows: W are having nice weather here, li is still We are lonesome for ice and snow got here like a traveling salesman. Ah we did was to ask the people which was the next train to take. Ben came near losing his ticket in Little Falls. We got on the uvJu and next thing- Me did is get off in St. Paul and we stayed there over half a day because the men that wear red caps told ns that no train will leave for Lawrence until o'clock. AVe went all over the oily and never saw such high buildings until we got in St. Paul. We passed Minneapolis. We would of stayed there if we changed cars there. When we go...

Publication Title: Red Lake News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Red Lake news. — 15 November 1915

A newspaper devoted ty the int*test of the Red Lake Chippewa Indian*. Semi-monthly, Sept. 1st to July 15. Subscription 75c a year EnterWas^ecolQdciaSs'matter September 1,1912, at the postoffice at Bed Lake, Minn., under the act of March 3,1879. Address all communications to RED LAKE NEWS, Red Lake, Minn. INDIAN PROGRESS. That Cato Sells is discovering the Indian is eloquently attested by the premium list of the fifth annual Pima Indian fair, to be held at Sacaton, Ariz., November 3 to 5. If this was to be the first Pima Indian fair the liberality and variety of the list might be viewed as an arrangement to promote interest. As it is the fifth, the'list must be regarded as an appreciation of what has been accomplished. All the agricultural products of the state are included. The corn premiums have a value of $127, and the total of all premiums reaches the handsome proportion of four figures. The domestic department reveals the In dian woman in anew light. There are lib eral premiums ...

Publication Title: Red Lake News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Red Lake news. — 15 November 1915

THE FOLLOWING 1-8 A CONDENSED SUMMARY OF THE EXTEMPORANE- OUS ADDRESS MADE BY COMMIS- SIONER CATO SELLS ON THE LAST DAY (RETURNED STUDENT'S DAY) OF THE CONFERENCE RECENTLY HELD AT SAN FRANCISCO. (Continued from last issue.) In our labors with these primitive people, we are too prone to become impatient. There is a disposition to expect a revolution rather than evolution, such as has come about in two thousand years of the white man's civi lization. It is unfair, it is unjust to expect more rapid progress from the Indian than is shown in the development of the white race.. If I were called upon to indicate the one important word in our relations with the Red man, it would be patience. In this splendid audience of Service em ployees and friends of the Indian, there are a large number of returned' students. Let me briefly address myself especially to the products of our Indian schools. I find among returned students on the reservations something of unrest a more general tendency to wan...

Publication Title: Red Lake News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Red Lake news. — 15 November 1915

THE FOLWWIN&\W A (fQNDENSED, SUMMARY OF THE EXTEMPORA- NEOUS ADDRESS MADE BY COM MISSIONER CATO SELLS ON THE LAST DAY (RETURNED STUDENTS' DAY) OF THE CONFERENCE RE- CENTLY HELD AT SAN FRANCISCO. (Continued From Page 3) to be discouraged. It is my information that in practically all of the non-reservation boarding schools there are Indian boys and girls who have been transported at Govern ment expense long distances from their homes, passing other schools more accessi ble and having as good facilities this condition is ordinarily inexcusable, and should not continue. It makes- a large and unnecessary expense for transportation, en courages unrest, has a demoralizing influ ence on the student body in many instances places pupils in schools wholly foreign to their after life residence, limits desirable acquaintance with those with whom they will mingle thereafter, and in an industrially way, particularly agricultural, gives but little opportunity for acquiring knowledge of conditio...

Publication Title: Red Lake News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Red Lake news. — 1 December 1915

%r* VOLUME 4. NEWS ITEM. The Committe on course of study for the United States Indian schools recently con vened by the Commissioner of Indian Af fairs, Cato Sells, after several weeks' work in conference at Washington lias completed a course of study which will give to the Indians the best vocational training offered by any school system in the United States. As these schools must train Indian youth of both sexes to assume the duties and re sponsibilities of self-support and citizenship, this course strongly emphasizes vocational training. It is divided in three divisions. The first is the beginning stage, the second the find ing stage, and the third the finishing stage. During the first and second periods the training in domestic and industrial activi ties centers around the conditions essen tial to the improvement and proper main tenance of the home and farm. The course outlined in the prevocational division is unique in the fact that in addition to the the regular academic subje...

Publication Title: Red Lake News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Red Lake news. — 1 December 1915

A KEJD L*AJ\EJ x-rxr ATTTTATC Plie A newspaper devoted to the interests of the Red Lake Chippewa Indians. Semi-monthly, Sept. 1st to July 15. Subscription 75c a year Entered as second class matter September 1,1912, at the postoffice at Red Lake, Minn., under the act of March 3, 1879. Address all communications to RED LAKE NEWS, Red Lake, Minn. REAL HELP FOR THE INDIAXS. The present Commissioner of Indian Af fairs, Cato Sells, of Texas, has not only taken a keen and unusual interest in behalf of improving the social and educational con ditions of the Indians, but he has succeeded in commanding the country's interest to this work. There lias never been a time when so intelligent and general an under standing of the real Indian problem existed among the public generally. Especial attention, therefore, is likely to be attracted to the announcement that the Indian Service committee on courses of study for the Indian Schools has completed preparation of a scheme which will give direction ...

Publication Title: Red Lake News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Red Lake news. — 1 December 1915

NEWS ITEM. The following interesting excerpts are taken from the Indian School Children's prize essays on "Alcohol and My Future.'' Hoopa Valley Boarding School, Hoopa, CaliforniaEftie Davis, age 14, Grade 7. "Alcohol and My Future" Many of the business men employ workers who use no alcohol, and the positions that are opened to the user of alcohol is growing smaller every year. If the men who drink should quit buying alcohol and save thir money, they will find that they will have a better home for their families. The Odanah Day SchoolElla Poppia, age 15, Grade 8. "Alcohol and My Future." Drunkeness may very properly be con sidered as temporary insanity, caused by the poisoning of the nerve cells by the use of alcohol. The mind of an intoxicated per son works no more accurately than his mus cles do. Alcohol causes about twenty per cent of all insanity. Any joung man seeking an employment in a responsible position soon learns that one of the first questions asked an appli cant is whet...

Publication Title: Red Lake News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Red Lake news. — 1 December 1915

INTERESTING INFORMATION FROM THE ANNUAL REPORT OF THE FORT YUMA SCHOOL, CALIFORNIA. The greatest change in conditions lias come with the advent of Prohibition in Arizona. Yuma, just across the Colorado River into the streets of which Ave look from Indian School Hill has experienced a change which seldom appears except in fiction. All of the saloons have been replaced with clean business enterprises. The town has been renovated in every way and bootleggers the greatest curse to Indian Progress have been relentlessly prosecuted and since January 1, 1915, not one Yuma Indian has been known to take an intoxicating drink where previous to this ten drunken Indians were to deal with in a single day and the first Sunday in May, 1913, there were 17 arrests on the reservation for drunken ess and dis orderly conduct. REMEMBER. Contributed Minnesota is the leading butter state in the Union. Minnesota is the leading iron state in the Union. The Sixth Congressional district is the leading sunshin...

Publication Title: Red Lake News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Red Lake news. — 15 January 1916

^y^ AGENY ITEMS. The News is in receipt of a long letter from Otto Thunder who entered Carlisle from this reservation three years ago but has since entered the Ford Motor works of De troit, Michigan. For the first six months he takes up the student's course, at the same time being paid thirty-four cents an hour, working eight hours a day. After finishing the course, if satisfactory to the company, he will be transferred to work as a regular em ployee at |5.00 per day. After promotion he will no longer be considered a student of Carlisle. Otto has finished a practical course of horseshoeing at Carlisle and isnowasplendid blacksmith. We hare had excellent reports about him and other Red Lake Agency pupils and we are proud of their success. Charlie Prentice was a caller at the Agen cy office Wednesday. Judge Wain-je-mah-dub is not doing so wTell this winter. Some of his friends think he should enter the hospital. Mrs. Fannie Barton is on the sick list again this winter. Leslie Workman ...

Publication Title: Red Lake News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Red Lake news. — 15 January 1916

I ever saw.? RED LAKE NEWS A newspaper devoted to the interests of the Red Lake Chippewa Indians. Semi-monthly, Sept. 1st to July 15. Subscription 75c a year Entered as second class matter September 1,1912, at the postoffice at Red Lake, Minn., under the act of March 3,1879. Address all communications to RED LAKE NEWS, Red Lake, Minn. We like to receive this kind of a letter as the News needs the money. Detroit, Mich., Jan. 3rd, 1916. 58 La Belle Ave., Highland Park. Mr. Walter F. Dickens, Red Lake, Minn. Dear sir: Inclosed please find money order for (75c) in payment for "Red Lake News" for one year. Please begin the subscription with the next issue. Yours truly, OTTO THUNDER. MINNESOTA INDIAN EXHIBIT AT STATE FAIR. In a recent letter from the Honorable Commissioner of Indian Affairs, it is an nounced that "In view of the splendid suc cess of our first Indian exhibit at the state fair this fall, and pursuant to the invitation of the Fair Officials, I have decided to re peat the exl...

Publication Title: Red Lake News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Red Lake news. — 15 January 1916

AGENCY ITEMS. Continued From Page 1) the New Hospital. Mrs. Frank comes to us from The Wahpeton School, No. Dakota. Dr. Oulp is the busiest man on the Reser vation these days. Speaking of the hospi tal he says, to be right, ""frraiik" with a few more "Spikes" he could make things more "Bright" in the cold weather. The Red Lake public school opened the 10th, but has had rather an irregular at tendance due to the cold weather and an epidemic of Grip. Miss Mabel Moore visited home folks dur ing the Holidays. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas visited Mr. Thomas' home in Alton, Illinois, during the Holi days. Miss McEvers was laid up with an attack of the Grip recently. We understand Miss Hoffman is looking tor i companion. Mrs. Frank Lariver (Haskell) has had visions of Sun Flowers recently. Her hus band, Frank Lariver, (Chilocco) says it's this 4 degree below zero weather that's troubling her. The new hospital opened its doors to pa tients on Friday, the Thirteenth. There is nothing superstitious ab...

Publication Title: Red Lake News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Red Lake news. — 15 January 1916

AGENCY ITEMS. (Continued From Page 3) from the Northwest Angle during the Holi days and took lumber to improve their ten tative allotments on their return. Alex wants to know what's going to happen to his improvements if he should die? He also says that the Indian settlers in his commu nity, want and need a Blacksmith, that they don't need a Farmer. Mr. George Hippell of Oklee, has finished delivering 55 tons of timothy hay to the Agency. Xavier Downwind writes that he is em ployed in the Ford Motor works in Detroit, Mich., that he is receiving good wages, and enjoys his work. Capt. Eberhardt, a well known skipper on Hed Lake, is spending the winter in Canada, being employed by the Winton-Nichols Lumber Company. Frank Defoe, John Day, William Sayers, John English, (Jeorge Neadeau, and others have been hauling wood to the school. We have plenty of snow now which makes sleighing very good except where it has drifted. Anton Doelile has moved into the office formerly occupied by Dr. Cul...

Publication Title: Red Lake News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Red Lake news. — 1 February 1916

ME \SLES. is a disease which is sudden in onset, easilv acquired, and recognized by moderate fever, more or less discharge from the nose and sore throat, sometimes a dry cough, and a reddish eruption slightly raised and first appearing about the face and head, later covering the entire body. This breaking out occurs on the fourth day after the pati ent first begins to complain. There is usually a moderate fever. After exposure to the contagion it takes from 10 to 11 days for the disease to appear. Owing to the ease with which it may be acquired, it is us ually referred to as a disease of childhood, although one may have it at any age if not protected by a previous attack. A very large percentage of people have it during school life or earlier. Good care during the disease is essential to prevent complications. A form of pneu monia is perhaps the worst thing to fear, and this results from the child being al lowed to be up and around, in drafts, on cold floors, running out of doors, i...

Publication Title: Red Lake News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Red Lake news. — 1 February 1916

RE LAKE NEWS A newspaper devoted to the interests of the Red Lake Chippewa Indians. Semi-monthly, Sept. 1st to July 15. Subscription 75c a year Entered as second class matter September 1,1912, at the postoffice at Red Lake, Minn., under the act of March 3, 1879. Address all communications to RED LAKE NEWS, Red Lake, Minn. DEPARTMEM' OF THE INTERIOR. Office of Indian Affairs. Wasliington. January 10, 1910. To Superintendents and other Employees of the United States Indian Service: In an address before the Congress on In dinn Progress held at San Francisco in August of last year I said: "It is our chief duty to protect the In dian's health and to save him from pre mature death. Before we educate him, before we conserve his property, we should save his life. If he is to be per petuated, we must care for the children. We must stop the tendency of the Indi an to diminish in number, and restore a condition that will insure his increase. Every Indian hospital bed not neces sarly occupied w...

Publication Title: Red Lake News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Red Lake news. — 1 February 1916

-iiirmr iitf mi in "t in mi" i-iMinnr i r-r- Alt A'YARD MANURE. Plants eat and breathe the same as peo ple and animals. They derive their nour ishment from the soil, and it is only through the proper methods of supplying the soil with the proper nourishment that we can increase the Melds of our crops. Barnyard manure is the cheapest, best, and most abundant food that we can sup ply the soil so that the crops may grow. It contains all the essential plant food, ele ments. and organic matter, a substance ne cessary to maintain soil bacteria. It con tains what is chemically known as Nitrogen Phosphorous and Potash, the essential ele ments necessary for plant life. If we harvest a crop ^ear after year and do not return the elements necessary for plant life it cannot be expected that the crops will increase in yields, but rather de crease. The value of barnyard manure, based upon the elements in it, as compared to the amount of grain taken from the soil i^ placed at $3.00 per ton. It take...

Publication Title: Red Lake News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Red Lake news. — 1 February 1916

UI INDIINS ENTERTAIN CHRISTIAN ENDEAYOR. A quartet of Indian students from Hamp ton Institute recently proved a decided suc cess in entertaining the large crowd who attended tlie Christian Endeavor Society meeting in the First Presbyterian Church, Newport, News Virginia. Captain Arthur Harri.s, a Mohave-Apache from San Carlos, Arizona, delivered a few well-chosen remarks on his early life and tribal customs. Eli Bird, a Cherokee, from Swaynev, N. C, sang a Cherokee song. Henrv McL. Owl, a Cherokee, from Rod dey, S. C. and Frank IJlackhoop, a Sioux, from Shield, N. I)., assisted in singing some plantation songs and other melodies, and helped to make this one of the most successful meetings ever held by the En deavors.Hampton Institute Press Ser vice, Hampton, Va. BOTTLES AND RAGS. Homer Kadheaver, the musical director of an evangelist, said in a temperance ad dress at San Francisco: "Once on a visit to England, I noticed that the ragmen, instead of shouting, 'ftags, hones, old iron!'...

Publication Title: Red Lake News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Red Lake news. — 15 February 1916

*^F WWipSf 5Kr nnssr^ ,.v AGENCY ITEMS. Supt. Dickens who departed for Washing ton on January 29th, has not yet returned. A party of Red Lakers consisting of N. J. Head, P. H. Beau lieu, Wm. Sayers, Pay she-ke-zhig and Still Day departed for Washington on the 7th inst. Mr. John G. Morrison, President of the Geriferal Council of the Chippewas of Minnesota, and also *i resident of Red Lake accompanied the party. Nay-gah-bow died of pneumonia on the 10th, inst., at the Red Lake Hospital. He was a brother of Mrs. Alexeance Jourdain who recently died of the same disease. De cedent was unmarried and leaves surviving a brother, Ke-me-wun, and a half sister, Mrs. Chas. Fineday. Joseph Roberts was a recent visitor in Red Lake from his home near Sayersville. Mr. Roberts had brought one of his children in to enroll in St. Mary's Mission School but on account of the epidemic of measles in that school was compelled to delay the enrollment of his child for the present. For the third time within t...

Publication Title: Red Lake News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Red Lake news. — 15 February 1916

A i-ri A newspaper devoted to the interests of the RedXake Chippewa Indians. Semi-monthly, Sept. 1st to July 15. TK Subscription a yeai Entered as second class matter September 1,1912, at the postoffice at Red Lake, Minn., under the act of March 3,1879. Address all communication* to RED LAKE NEWS, Red Lake, Minn. INDIANS' ACHIEVEMENTS. Continued From Page 1) who is at present enrolled at the Carlisle Indian School, to set the world's record for assembling a car of that make. He had the machine ready for the road in two hours and fifty minutes after beginning workN The previous record-was three hours. An item from a South Dakota paper says: Winner, $. D., Jan. 3.Frank Janis, a well-known Sioux Indian, who lives a few miles north of Winner, was notified this week that he has been appointed a member of the police force guarding the United States capital and office buildings of the House of Representatives at Washington, D. C. The position pays a good salary and last during the entire s...

Publication Title: Red Lake News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Red Lake news. — 15 February 1916

"~W~" INDIANS' ACHIEVEMENTS. (Continued From Page 2) tion in Minnesota, tH pupils raised chick ens. An old incubatfclr and some eggs wer# furnished the teachefe1 and he gave twentyf four fine Barred Rooi chickens to seven of the girls of the schdpl, no two girls beinj from the same fam#. He then offere i prize of one dollar to the pupil who wqtyV make her chick weigh,, the most by the (fat week in September,, living a second ptpe of fifty cents. Sixteen chickens were ejm|bjr ited on September ith, these ranging! .rweight from 1 1-2 t$, 2 34 pounds. I|ortt Smith, nine years oM,"won"first prize, Iter ihree chickens wei^ning 1 2-3 pounds This year there ajfe several hundred dia boys and girll, but especially #j| -entered in club work in Minnesota, Or^ Arizona and other States. Now that original Americans nave come to the fJ in a genuine American movement, we look for a general i enthusiasm among] -dian farm boys and jjjffolg. It will mean these Indian farmers will soon be t\}\ their fa...

Publication Title: Red Lake News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Red Lake news. — 15 February 1916

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR. Office of Indian Affairs. ^Washmgton. (Continued from* last issue.) be urged upon the present Congress. It is believed that the property of the Indians and the funds received from the sale of their lands should be released from the lien now imposed upon same for the total expense of constructing these projects and that the cost of'construction shall be impos ed upon water users, Indian and white man, alike, without discrimination according to the benefits received by each. 12. For the first time an appropriation out of the Ute Judgment Fund was made for the benefit of the several tribes of Ute In dians to which same belonged, a consider able part of which is being utilized to pro tect the water rights of the Indians on the Uintah ^Reservation. Since March 14, 1915, more than 20,000 acres has been placed un der cultivation and the water rights there by protected. Continuation of this work approaching the progress now being made will insure full protection ...

Publication Title: Red Lake News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
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