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Elephind.com contains 317 items from Polynesian, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 26 September 1840

E PUHLKSIIEJ) WKKKLV, AT HONOLULU, () A !IU, SANDWICH ISLANDS. j. j. JAI1VES, Editor; SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2(5, 1840. Vol. 1. JYo. 10 CO M M tJ,I(Ti:i). The tfnviifator's or S.maoa 2s- a mis. Their Manners, Customs, and Superstitions, lly T. Heath, Muuouo. (Contiuiu.'il from inQ .")().) (iovi.iiN'ii-T am) Lkoisi.atjon. Samoa is not suhjoct to the rulo of a jijulr king or chief ; hut in some cxten ssivc districts an individual lias often, con siderable power. Tin; l;it; Tamafuga, who united in his person the attributes of a chiet and a god, having assistoiLa pdw-i crl'iil district in Savaii to conuera rival dNtrirt, was complimented witb the title df -0 le Tupu o Sahilaii,"-tho king of On the death of a chief the leadership If the lmshand ho only jealous of his is generally continued in his. familv, hut i wife, he will sometimes have her car or the rule of primogeniture is by no means 'part of her nose cut oil, as a badge of followed. The brother or Uncle of the ' disgrace. deceased o...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 26 September 1840

62 THE POLYNESIAN. September, That intemperance is the natural conse quence of unrestrained traffic in ardent .spir its all oust experience in other countries proves to a demonstration. An J it is also true that the increase of cri;nc generally keeps p;i':c with intemper ance. The natural course of tiie -latter id onward and downward to poverty and crime. This truth stand out piomiuet;t in tin; his tory of the effects of alcoholic tlrin, when taken ai a beverage, in rjl nation-, li.;wi the savage and barbarous to the enlightened. In the 'latter it has prostrated the most pow erful and highly cultivated intellects in status men, literarv men and others in the highest walks of life, ami not unfrequeutly brought di-grace, penury and wretchedness, whilst to the middle and lower classes it has ahu-ist unilbrmly been the harbinger of untold mise ry and w ant. To savages and barbarians it has been the precursor of disease and deathj and in many cases has been eminently In strumental in nea...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 26 September 1840

THE POLYNESIAN. 63 SiO. f'tv, needs no defense (Votn hip. TIim dis Vnrtiihcd christian and philanthropist has 'fifved liimself tlio benefactor of lim race. I c 1i;h expended tens of thousand- of dol- M travelled through Europe at.d the U. I itps, vi-titcd the courts of princes and cot- je.s f peasants in the prosecution of the 7 eat and disinterested wuik of benevolence which he is cnaed; namely, the binau l mtinn of his fellow men from the thraldom d" intemperance, the worst ol tyrants. ; Uy the authority and under the patronage l 'tho King of the French, the Temperance. )C'i:ncnts, a valuable publication compiled lr Ivhvards, has been translated into t! f French langunsfe.' The Duke of Orleans has long been a I ember of the temperance Society. A writer in of the latter, he "was educated like his ti'cestnr, Henry IV'.in the public institu Jns of his country, and distinguished hirn rtlt'bv his success in his studies. The fami rfofthe Duke, (the present king) was ever tSuulel of unbn...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 26 September 1840

64 Till: POLYNESIAN. pHPTESimj From t lie Knickerbocker. my cod diiuxts ti:l: lOUM. The Spirit of the Tempest shook Hi9 wing of raven hue Above the sea,' and hollow wimljS Howled o'er the waters blue. Uprose the mountain billows high And swept a stormy path; Darkness and Terror mingled thevo Their ministry of wrath. A lonely bark, by bounding seas Tost wildly to and fro, 1 Dashed o'er the billow's foaming brow ' To fearful depths below. , , Crash echoed crash !-thc quivering spars Broke o'er the leaning side, And left the bark a shattered wreck, The stormy waves to ride. The sturdy seaman struggled hard To hold the yielding helm, And keep the ship's prow to the surge, That threatened to o'erwhehu. And when the plunging ruin spurned Their impotent control, They flew to drown their gloomy fears In the accursed bowl. Upon the raging ocean then 1 ' Helpless was left tho burk To the wild mercy of the waves, Amid the tempest dark. Upon the deck, alone, there stood, A man of courage high; ...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 3 October 1840

rm PO LA o 'WMMJWJWUI.JiMllllJW.llUWWMWUIMI!W rUHLISIIKI) WI3KKLY, AT HONOLULU, OAIIU, SANDWICH ISLANDS. j J. JAUVES, Editor. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 18 10. Vol. l.-IVo. 17. Aw COM M US I (' AT K II. Xhc.Vi visitor's or $nnio:i En- laiuk Their Maimers, Customs, and Superstition. Iiy T. I loath, Muuono. (Cmit ititicd from page (i1).) IIoiSK liuiLDING.- Tli'1 erect ion of their houses exhibits 'I ....I.I, .1 ill lllwl t t.M1 I .tic! 4' (YiHSlUi Tiii'iu i"iiu, ciimi i7 iihj i;ii.iiin.. onlv few families ; in other words, it is a trade. Almost any body, indeed, can cuiitniet a small cottage, such as the poorer sort live in ; but the large houses of t!ie chiefs, built for business ami for tin? entertainment of traveling parties. &e. arc the result of much skill, labor and ex p,!K'. The form of the proper Samoan lioiis'.'s is slightly oval ; those of an o! o;u h;ije are built after the Tonga fash- M'l 1 . L' 1 ..11 .1 . I i io:i. iiiewoouoi neany an ineir oesi lilies is bread fruit. A 'f...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 3 October 1840

6f THE POLYNESIAN. October, attention of your distant n ailers to the fact of the existence here of an excellent place, when; vessels of all descriptions, can he hove out and faithfully repaired. Il is well that such ihing as the ahove should lie, extensively kmAvn. partaking as it is hoth of a nautical and commercial character, conducive to the prosperity of this town and of immedi ate henefil to the great munoer oi vessels who c sails now sheathed, and newly coppered, masts lengthened. Schooner Clarion, hove out and copper repaired. JJrig IlaiTiq'ien, Capt. Chienc, of London, upper works caulked, new stern, tVc, l;tom caulked, and newlv coppered. Ship Iv'jsanne, (,'apt. Spalding, of New York, upper works caulked, vessel almost whiten ihehosom of the vast I'aci- Ih i g l'i ien;!--. Capt. Huirg, of Valparaiso. r works caulked, vessel how? out . . e suiuoin s'l iic m orniati ni in if . . fie. V latioji to the subject, tiiat may lie found useful to those who mav he i ileresU d in navi...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 3 October 1840

1340. an I pali of Kauai explored, and the harbor ofKancohe surveyed. The Caroline Archipelago presents almost a pew Hold tor exploration, and certainly prn extent, it inhabitants and wonder ( remains of a former race, one of great interest. K:Lir PLANTATION. Strolling over the pali the other day, we u,, a visit to tho plantation commenced by Pi!;ii, William Ilarehottlo and some other v.r.iiig Hawaiian, and was much g rati lied -;t!it!io zeal and perseverance they manifest n their work. Theirs is the iir.-t kae of liul I a wo believe) granted by this govern ment their subjects, and was obtained with mc trnuhlc. They have at the smallest THE POLYNESIAN. 67 had been divorced from his wife for some time past, but could not marry again while she was living. Having conceived a violent passion for another woman, ho determined to rid himself of his wife, and applied to Lo no, who was said to bo skilled in preparing poisons. Lono likewise wishing to destroy bus wile, the two agreed to poiio...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 3 October 1840

68 THE POLYNESIAN. tOcrorri, POET??. GLORIA IX KXCKLSlS.' Written on tlit. mountain lip-. (.buy t God on hih! the nullum raise! Where human voice hath ne r stirred tin air, Let the lirsl sounds that break the still ness there Make cadi bleak summit vocal with His praise, Who by his strength has set the moun tains fast, Ami gilded them with majesty and power, To stand unmoved w hile Time itself shall last; Towering sublime 'till that tremendous hour When from His presence they shall melt in fear Like wax O Thou that sittcst cvermoro At the right hand of God the Father, hear Our solemn prayer, that when these moun tain's hoar Shall quake to their foundations, wc the shock May sheltered bide in Thcc, our sure salvation's Rock! j. p. c. " r:ElTB,T PATT &, C0.3' " Hare for sale, 10 barrels American Beef, superior quality. 10 bar. Am. Flour, sup. qual. (Gallego Br.) 50 barrels California Beans. "0 baskets Champagne. COO sheets Sheathing Copper, lf and '21 oz. July 2-3. tf. NOTICE. Tho...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 10 October 1840

mm POLY MM liWBlWWlJWil.lUKlftPWI'JMiWILWBlHI 1 1 II 1 1 Willi" -MP HHW minw iih in in hwiiib i m iiiwwiiw iMiii w-rrni I I I J PUBLISHED WEEKLV, AT HONOLULU, OAIIU, SANDWICH ISLANDS. j. JAUVES, Editor. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1840. Vol. 1. No. IS. N WW AN 7 4-41 COM M DMC ATKK. flieSavijyaloi' r Samoa is- IjwU Their Manner!, Customs, and nerstitions. By T. 1 loath , Man'ono. (Concluded from p:ic(5.) List of birds, The following list will enable tho resi- . .. ..t'uii- irriiMIW 4ft 11 1 11 iri 1 In-ill-! I1 ';!S ill lHllv-1 -v wu.'uii, iiiviio . I a wood pigeon. Mail alii, a long-legged bird, a favorite with duels. 1 .1 I . A Mmi m?i' a ;ir rcd ani1 wmtc uiru, " with red lull. T.ivaV, u large bird, web-footed. i":;lni a large bird, 1 rm of a pigeon. a la "go black bird lives on hut nests in ine ninumains. Ti ;ii mo i, ) nearly the appearance ol the Tii Uiitifa, i g'g. Mum u:i, do. and is gregarious. u i o, a bird as large as a swan, makes its appearance in storms. A a!:i, a similar bi...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 10 October 1840

70 ready the ladies are seen marching up in their best dresses, each with a portion of food in her hand, held between clean leaves. As they enter the malac, each wife or daughter wheels olVtoward the place where her husband or father is sitting. When about two or three yards from him, she pciitly and irraeefully inclines her body forward in a sort of half bow, and remains in that posture ! receive his orders as to the party or chief to whom she shall serve the food. The order is inven and execu ted with the utmost regularity and meth od. , Makino Siru.Missio.N. If a village or district has committed a just cause of of fence .against another, and the offenders are willing to make submission, or beg pardon, they are expected to go loaded with stones, green bows and fire wood, and to bow down very abjectly in the presence of the oH'ended chief. As the articles thus carried are used in making their native ovens, probably they signify that the parties are deserving to become the servants...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 10 October 1840

1310. " PUAZILIAN J USTH E. 'flic Allowing anecdote was related to us r.:.wl fu linvinrr nrrurrrd nuite ro- n It i Jnnciro. An American ves- in leaving the harbor, ran into an L.ng i. i.,; .uon with coffee, cut her down to c water's edge, and destroyed the cargo the amount oi lU.UUU. 1 he case was ,)ii'fht before t!io courts of law. The con- ' ln A mr'i'ir.nti vpsstd lioiveivril it l'Hl:t' "i i " m .ruin" aiiainst her owners, as she was II ' a C7 ve(l to he to the windward, ard consc irntlv should have allowed room for the her vessel to pass. lie thereupon went to e jnde, and commenced abusing the legal liilliilis as uiuij; ii'iniij k;ii ivin in juuci, .i nl iihvavs giving cases ro ino strongest irtios. The judge replies, 'dlow so you u4 Uc mistaken, we always decide accord it to the nature of the evidence." "No," IV UK- C'MISIIH. IUI lll.-M .1111.1 , Ull! J.,11"- i ..;.... fthe Knirhsh lng, every bod Knows that . :n :. i mi ; .viii'.t H-iin win iiiw ii. i ii uti you ))))lc uofs. "j...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 10 October 1840

72 PCETP.T. The following lcim: jful line from the riiil.tdelpliia (i i.cMc, :iro attributed to t he editor, vvno Iiiis re cen'ly lost u lo'. cd ami HCfO.nplislird couiritnioii. Their touching Ritu p1ii v cannot fail in ri ichihe hc iit of every o.n, who fVntn hitter cxpi'iieiire can yiuru'.hic with tiie author. llumpiltii I'osi. I see the slill! Remembrance faithful to her trust, Calls thee in beauty l'roin the dust; Thou contest in the morning lipjit Thoti'rt with me through the .looiny night; In dreams I meet thee its of old, Then thy soli arms mv neck enfold, And thy sweet voice is in my car; lnevery scene to memory dear, 1 see thee still! I sec the still; In every hallowed token round; This little ring thy ringer bound This lock of hair thy forehead shaded, This silken chain by thee was braided; These flowers, all withered now like thee, Beloved, thou didst cull for trie; This book is thine here didst thou read; This picture, ah! here, indeed, I see thee still! I see thee stiU!...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 17 October 1840

TPIHEE POLY NIESIAI PUBLISHED WEEKLY, AT HONOLULU, OAIIU, SANDWICH ISLANDS. h j. JARVES, Editor. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17,1840. Vol. 1. No. 10. rn M M UXICATKD. !'e "tve room w it It niuch pleasure in our enhiiiiiH to nit- in, lowing imcrcsuug com iiniuicatiou. To many of our readers it niiv be somewhat dry and cyphery, but l tho learned and curious in such matters, it will he exceedingly interesting, and that must proves our np dogy for occupying so ginuicli space with nothing. Lahaina, Sept. 2.1, 18 40. Unit Sut, It is now a long time since I promised to furnish you the Japanese mi nimis for the paper : but an unusual va- ricty of entailments of late, have left me srarco a leisure hour, at any tune, for sn'h work. This is my apology for the delay. I will now, however, endeavor to (-imply with your request; or, at least, to furnish you with such an abstract of these numerals, us will enable any one to form hi verv good idea ol their system. To I. i y L'ivp vou the whole, as I copied th...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 17 October 1840

71 Iv to :is;iji lain hmv many of each lower 1 1 1 1 i it r r undo one of the next higher. Rut lie would not allow, thiit in any of I host- cases, there was any error. Proba bly, however, inoro learned Japanese would perceive the errors. I think I have, in the list 1 copied, data enough to correct the numbers which are wrong. Perhaps it might be done by the abstract here given. Hut as I zero would not al low that there was any mistake, I have preferred to set all down here according to his diction; leaving to every one, who may please, to correct for himself. I would only add, in conclusion, that ifanv o'io has curiosity enough to look oer these numerals, he should, by no means, begin in the middle ; but let him h-arn thoroughly the first ten cardinal numbers, and he will then find he has the key to unlock tlx; mystery of the whole. Vours truly, I). BALDWIN. THE POLYNESIAN. Mu. Moitoii, We now proceed to our third proposition, viz. that intemperance is the most fruitful source of pa...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 17 October 1840

1340. THE POLYNESIAN. 75 2 3 3 2 4 1 1 2 o 1 1 1 Masons, Tailors, Calkcrs, Sail makers, Shoe makers. Saddle nnil harness maker, Hatchers, Block maker, Cigar makers, Auctioneers, Tinkers, Kngraver, Printer, .Vgood watch maker U very much needed ,rre, and would command an excellent business. There are twenty families from the United Slates residing in Honolulu, including those ofthv? American Protestant Mission, in all, seventy si individuals, and five from Eng land, seventeen individual. The whole for iiL'ii population will probably amount to six hundred; but the census now being taken will civc the number of residents and native population accurately and when completed llirmigliont the islands will be published. Statistics of the American Mission cs tulilished at Honolulu, under the direction of t lie A. B. C. F. M., furnished by Mr. Levi Chamberlain, one of the secular agents of the mission. 'Ordained missionaries, 2; school teacher-. "2; secular agents, 2; printers, 2 (one of thes...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 17 October 1840

7(5 THE POLYNESIAN. October. For l ho Polynesian. Tin: voice of tup. it.stii.kx(:k. (Written ddiin'j the rain of tho Asiatic Oholen.) Rohdd I come; and I enme in wrath! Hear ye not the lament that resound on my path ? Seo ye not the red (lash of my lurid eye? I tell you 'twill blast as it passes vou by. I have vanquished the powers that guarded your sleep; Now learn ve hereafter to watch and to weep; For my spell shall be rung till your spirits have lied, from the courts of the living, to mope with the dead. Your brightest and fain st shall shudder and die. I will stretch forth my arm o'er the beauti ful sky, Till the sun shall pale in the poisoned air, And the summer-cloud thunder 'Despair! Despair!' I will dah your kings from their purple thrones, To raise mo a dome of their w hitened bones; And share their llesh with the greedy goule, And pledge him in blood nt the rich repast; Till the spheres shall echo my festive howl, And the spirits of air shrink back aghast, When they hear ...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 24 October 1840

POLYNESIAN PUBLISHED WEMLY, AT HONOLULU, O A II U , SANDWICH ISLAND S . j. J. JAUVES, Editor. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24 1840. Vol. '1. IVO. 911. COM 1 tJ . I V. AT K I). fu tin; Ivliiitr ol'lhe Pol) iioiun, viiK, 1 enclose you a brief account of the VVrcek of the. Whaler Independence, and a nineteen days voyage in a whale-lwat, poilonned hy myself and others, which I have been requested to ninko public tliroiijili your valuable ptiper. Pour years have elapsed since the events transpired, hut should you judge the nar. ative one that would interest your readers, you are at liberty to place it before them. Yours respectfully, M. CALKIN; Itoiiotulu, Sept. 22, 1840. How do you brad? South by rust, sir. Mr. (iibson, keep the .diip to tin; wiml, and mil in ? at '2 o'clock. Thus said Capt. Ilrayton, as ho left the deck at J) o'clock on the evening of Dec. 18:$."). The Independence had been at sea twenty five months, and had nearly ac complished the object of -her voyage; a few days of successful...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 24 October 1840

78 would follow us lor hours to.elhei and frequently plunge so near the boat :is lo throw Wilier into her. Tin; slightest thutnp against the half inch cedar boards' of which our boats were built, would have settled tho business lor us by scltliujj: u in the depths of the sen. Some such acci dent wo feared h;id happened to our o u trides in the miss'itcr boat 1 H si s search was fruitless we ;rai;i te red our course in company witli Cap'uin II. Nothing of importance. oeeurin;4 throuv.h ihe day ex cept, a slight accident fro:n a living lish. Those acquainted with the living lis!i may recollect of having frequently seen them rise out of the water to windward and sail oil' to leeward with the speed of 'an ar row thus did the one of which I speak and struck mm; square across my mouth which unfortunately was shut: I was knocked down by the Mow and. so was the lish. I not up naain, hut. the lish never did; poor thintr, it hid risen from the water to escape the jaws of a pfdphin only to fal...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 24 October 1840

3-10. KKay'T I'OU A NFVYSPAPKR. v j,,nr 4ory, which fill-- tip two'lhirds, . lotiir editorial, f"N (f ng words, 1fCe itniH I news, oho Hanging, one piilf. t'j) u-tics to tickle the fancy, ((.u. out toiir columns arc barely enough; Vi,l hirgc- advertisement! .n3 any man can K'C, v. ... . I t. . I at . 1 1 I r fikp na eulior s oiu oi.iim iiiuiv- en! 'tis through, sir, .i(.' reader! your task is to eat it. Fall! to, sir! cd being wrecked. Further progress was prevented by (la hawjnise) which hindered any further progress towards the south. Although not much will have been gained by this enterprise in point of utility, it will add greatly u our geographical and scien tific Knowledge. It does not appear that, any living beings or animals exist in these cold and dreary regions, not even a seal was seen, nor nnv very useful kind of whale. Captain Diunnnt D'Urvillc has, by this dis covery, earned an, additi mial title to the honors of his country, distinguished as his name has already been ...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 24 October 1840

80 THE POLYNESIAN. POETE.7. for the I'nly ijf.-i.m. Tin: sriMM'.n at km.mau.s. . Tlin snrrow iii!; orb of day wns sinking fnst, And Iih dim rays a partinar zliriinn-r vast Upon t!int lone and sterile monn!nin sil, Where Christ, the gentle friend of sinners, died. A solemn stillness brooded in the e.ir, -, As if the earthquake still presided there; And all the rest of nature held its breath, When Nature's God had (Limned himself to death. The voice of brutal morkerv was o'er. And shouts of 'crucify him' rung no more; Hut in the-depths of many a gloomy breast, By conscience doomed to know no future rest, Remorse had made himself a little I fell, And 'crucify him' echoed like a knell. The waving multitude retreated slow, With hearts presaging sonic unearthly woe; Hut many a fearful look was backward east, As if each trembled lest he might be last. Ami now uprose that solitary star, Which erst to David's city, from afar, Lighted the Eastern Magi with its ray, To where, the Saviour in a ...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
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