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Title: Mountain Laurel Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

MAY 1985 Monthly Journal of Mountain Life GRANNIE DOLLIE Today I sat at my desk looking out the window at Granny Dollie's old home place and the little knoll where she and Grandpa Hylton are buried. I am filled with mixed emotions, happy and sad. The sadness is that Granny is gone and Grandpa Hylton died very young and I never did know him. Granny always told me what a good man he was. My happy emotions are the fond memories I have of Granny Dollie. My Grandmother Hylton was named Louella Adline. Her father called her "Doll", thus she got the name Dollie and it stayed with her throughout life. Everyone in the neighborhood called her Aunt Dollie, even if they were not related. Granny Dollie was left a widow at an early age with five small children to care for. Grandpa Hylton passed away at the early age of 33- She kept the family together and made a way on the farm. My Dad used to tell me, "We always had something to eat.". Grannie Dollie sent the children to school. She loved to rea...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

1 PAGE 2 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1985 FROM OUR READERS: MY MOTHER AND GRANDMOTHERS By: Bobbie Bowman Clement My mother, Nellie Lee Wilson Bowman was born and raised in Kibler Valley. There she went to a one room school before going on to the Blue Ridge Boarding School, where she met my Daddy. I loved for her to play the "French Harp" (as the harmonica .was called) and sing the words to Red Wing, Barbara Allen, Rosewood Casket and many others. She took us swimming lots of times when Daddy worked at the granite quarry at Mt. Airy. I could swim before I went to school. Mama curled my long red hair into Shirley Temple curls and made lots of dresses, even without patterns. She loved nursing, always going to help some needy family or deliver a baby. She worked hard to help my oldest sister through nursing school. I remember during the War when shoes were rationed. She was the last to get new ones. One of my sisters used up the most stamps. I could not understand her tears at my only brother ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

The Mountain Laurel "Gets the word out faster than a whisper on a party line!" If you want to get the word out about your business, call: 703-593-3613 or write. j^ e Mountain Laurel Route 1 Meadows of Dan, VA 24120 And Place Your A (OUR THANKS TO MISS ADDIE WOOD OF MAYBERRY TRADING POST FOR HELPING US MAKE A POINT.) MAY, 1985 MOUNTAIN LAUREL PAGE 3

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

PAGE 4 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1985 J "Miss Connie" was born in Carroll County, Virginia, June 9, 1892, to Rueben and Octavia Alice Bowman Worrell. Her parents gave one name to each of their children at birth, to which each would add a name of their choice when they were older. Connie chose Elizabeth to go with her name. She was one of nine children, reared in a two-room log house which had a loft for the children to sleep in. Later the logs were covered with unpainted, undressed boards. The cracks between the boards were covered with strips of wood. This made the house look like a mansion to the children. Hardship dominated their early lives. They barely had food to eat and clothes to wear, but they were rich in love. Connie was stricken with diptheria at an early age, so she bacame the pet of the family. The high fever of her sickness caused her jet-black hair to become curly. That, combined with a "peaches and cream" complexion made her the belle of the .community. Her father encour...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

MAMA'S HANDS AND MINE © COPYRIGHT 1985 Foreward by Addie J. W00d.... Mama's hands belong to Ruth Wood Harris. She raised six children. Her husband was Math Harris. She loved to go to square dances and was a good dancer, also a good cook, for her father-in-law said the first time he ate her biscuits, "Such, such biscuits have never been made!" She was the first lady to buy and drive her own automobile in Mayberry. Her garage was a log barn over 100 years old at her father's farm, known as the Tyra Barnard place on Mayberry Creek. Mama has always had beautiful hands, and all of her children and many of her grandchildren, have inherited them. They are not ornamental hands in that sense of the word, but capable, dependable ones - hands that could rock the cradle or, if the owner so desired, rule the world. Her hands remain pretty even with the advancing years and the toll of hard work. Sometimes it is interesting to me to consider the differences in what our hands, so like in appearance...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

PAGE 6 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1985 YOU CAN TAKE THE BOY OUT OF THE COUNTRY, BUT... Editor's Note... Charles B. Martin, Sr. is a regular feature writer for the Saltville Times in Saltville, Virginia. He exhibits a style of writing comparable to that of O'Henry and Mark Twain and it is with pleasure that we once again feature one of his delightful stories. A few days ago I was in my old four-wheel drive vehicle, down on the supermarket parking lot. While my wife was inside, picking up a few groceries, I sat and idly watched the endless flow of humanity through the automatic opening and closing doors. This activity turned my memory back to my first encounter with one of those electronic monstrosities and the predicament it got me into. At the time of this epic event my general knowledge of doors was pretty limited - being confined to the types normally found around the farmstead. Oh, I was familiar enough with the brassknobbed ones that made a pretense at keeping the flies and hogs out o...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

YOU CAN TAKE A BOY OUT OF THE COUNTRY 8UT.... Continued from page 6. where I originated from was soon put to rest. On this particular night, Billy and I polished off a fine steak supper in the Farragut Hotel dining room and wandered outside to stretch our legs a bit before retiring. As we meandered aimlessly up and down the sidewalk, Billy seemed totally preoccupied with the displays in the store windows. My attention was focused on something far more captivating, the Friday night invasion of co-eds. Everywhere I looked there were girls. They were strolling by us on all sides and I was even bumping into the oncoming ones while I was backing down the sidewalk - trying to get a better overall view of some that had just passed. It was this preoccupation that caused me to miss seeing what happened next. As Billy turned into an elaborate, girl-filled, drug store, I failed to notice that the door had opened on its own at his apwas Y° o£il2Hl^. H ° ME DU6SPUR ,VA. WOOD'S GUEST HOME . 1208 ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

f PAGfi '8 •' M6(7NTA'iN LAI/tfEL 1 MAY, - 19&5 I REMEMBER GRANDMA HYLTON Sara Leah Agee was born October 17, 187$. Everybody knew her as "Sallie". She was the daughter of Tom and Mary Agee. Tom ran a mill on Laurel Fork Creek. Sallie met Newton Hylton and they married March 20th. 1897They lived on the head waters of Howell Creek in Floyd County, Virginia where Grandpa Newton ran a mill. In January 1900, my father Albert was born. About 1912, they moved to West Virginia and lived there for about two years. They moved back to Meadows of Dan and bought a small farm on Laurel Fork Creek. I remember going over to Grandma Hylton's house and going with her to feed the chickens and get the eggs. There was a rock out next to her chicken house that had a hole in it where she had beat up so much glass and pieces of stone jars to feed her chickens. [Chickens have to have such materials to produce thick egg shells.] I would go with her to milk the cows. I would stay with them as muc...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

GROWING UP ON TOGGLES CREEK As early as I can remember, there was always plenty of mountain trout in Tuggles Creek. I can just recall seeing groups of 6 to 8 young men come down the creek on a good fishing day and by the time they got to the lower end of our farm, they would each have a very sizable string of fish. By the time I got big enough to xish, the trout had become scarcer, but still enough for good sport. Uncle Flornoy had made us a big watering trough of wide> thick boards and put it just below the spring house where the water cascaded into it strong enough to keep plenty of air in the water. Since the creek was so close, I got into the habit of gping to the creek and fishing till I caught a trout, and then running as fast as I could to put GRANNIE DOLL IE Continued from page 1. her. She went to singing school as a young girl. Many evenings we sat on the porch singing hymns and listening to the little "peep frogs" in the swamp. She called these frogs her "little...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

PAGE 10 MOUNTAIN LAUREL May, 1985 THOSE INTERESTING DAYS AND EVENTS School days have always been a foremost part of our memories. An old saying is, "The older a person is, the farther they walked to school." Walking to school was an accepted part of life. A one mile walk required 18 to 20 minutes. A two mile walk required 35 to 45 minutes. I never heard of a school bus until I was well out of College. My grandfather, Major C. C. Worrell lived about 3 miles southwest of Hillsville. As a young man he was illiterate until he was 16 or 17 years old, at which time he determined to get an education. He started in school. The teacher gave him special assignments to do at home after teaching him one hour each day before the school hours for the regular students began. In three years time my grandfather completed what would be considered six grades and probably two years of high school. He then began teaching school but continued educating himself with the assistance of other more highly edu...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

THOSE INTERESTING DAYS Continued from page 10. til they had deposited their can in the bottom of a hollow tree and covered it with leaves. Some fifty years afterward Ed told me, "That was the handiest drinking can I ever saw. We would loosen the top to let the air in and drink out of the spout and it worked just right." From then on until school was out they visited their tree cache morning and afternoon on their way to and from school. On the last morning of school they took a pint bottle and filled it with the remainder, and threw the empty can into the bushes. John placed the bottle in the waistband of his trousers and they went on to school. The final exercises ended about 12:30 or 1:00 P.M. John and Ed were among the last to leave the school yard. They had gone about 30 steps down the road when John pulled the bottle out and said, "Let's have a drink and celebrate." They did. Looking back John saw my Uncle E. E. coming out of the school yard with his books and records under his...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

PAGE 12 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1985 JOHN HAYES HOLLOW © COPYRIGHT 1985 BY: HAZEL HEDRICK On a cold but sunny morning in 1929, my brother, John Henry, my two sisters, Hessie and Agnes and I were on our way to Piney Grove School, four miles on the other side of the mountain. It was around 7:00 or 7:30 - The one clock we had was stopped and we had to guess at the time by where the sun was on the tree tops on the mountains that surrounded the John Hayes Hollow. We were supposed to go over the Vern Mountain, but this morning, brother Johnny suggested we go the Tedder Road. Now this was against the rules. We were never supposed to go any road or path except the one our parents told us to go. But, Johnny was the adventuresome kind and always tried to get us to go along with him. Most of the time, when he made a suggestion, I would say a flat NO. But this morning, I was feeling a bit adventuresome too. I didn't put up much of an argument. We decided, even if it was a little farther, to go the...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

The following is an excerpt from a journal kept by Elizabeth Cooley McClure of Carroll County, Virginia from 1842 (she was 17 then) until her death in Is4s. Her journal not only reflects the day to day world she and her family lived in, but a young girl's hopes and expectations for the future. A special thanks to the Cooley family for sharing it with us. April 11th, 1846. Smyth County, Rivalley, waters of Holston, 55 miles from home, the 9th of April we started towards Texas. Went to Grayson Courthouse, purchased feathers and bade them all farewell there..then went on to John Dickenson's, stayed there all night and was treated with all kindness imaginable, bid them farewell, and then the last tie was broken that had bound us to stay. I left home better than I expected right at the starting, but bad was the best for it seemed like breaking my heart to leave my poor Mother and Father and Grandmother, who had been always so kind, and loved me so well. It seemed like they could scarcely...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

PAGE 14 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1985 The Mail Box The Mountain Laurel, I've enjoyed and shared with others your publication for several months. Some of your writers have extraordinary talent. The pictures are my favorite, though. A picture treated monthly as you did the one in March would be enjoyable. The responses might be very satisfying when people come forth with an identification. Thanks, H.O. Ligon Danville, VA. Dear Readers, Please see page 21 in this issue. We have printed two old photographs from the archives of the Blue Ridge Institute of Ferrum College. Neither of the people in the photos have been identified and we're hoping one of you may know who they are. If you enjoy this, we will print more in future issues. Thank you, Susan Thigpen, Editor The Mountain Laurel, Enclosed is my check for a year's subscription to "Mountain Laurel" and a Backroads Tours. My son sent a copy of the January issue containing the interesting article on Pine Creek Primitive Baptist Church. The ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

Genealogy I have been doing research on the Setliff or Sutliff family tree for the past 11 years and am at a standstill. I am in hopes some of your readers will supply me with more information. Most of my family were from Patrick Co. and the area that is now Phillpot Lake and Fairystone Park. My father was Dennis Noel Setliff born 1897, Grandfather Robert Lee Setliff born 1874, Great grandfather John Abram Setliff born 1851, G. G..Grandfather Burnett (Barney) Sutliff born 1820, G. G. G. Grandfather Abram Setliff born 1741, G. G. G. G. Grandfather John Setliff born 1695. D. Lee Setliff 29 Carden Drive (Fairlawn) Radford, VA 24141 Subscribe Today To The Mountain Laurel A Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life 1 Year (12 Issues) Only *B.OO Send A Gift! or 2 Y ear (24 Issues) Only *14.00 Tell us the occasion (Happy Mothers Day, Happy Birthday, Get Well Soon, Anniversary, Thinking OA/ / T 1 d~\ 1 O AA Of You) and we will send the O Y ear (oO ISSUCS ) Ullly loAIU appropriate card. (CANADA AND A...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

PAGE 16 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1985 The use of stone or stonelike objects in healing disease or illness is a practice believed to have originated in the Orient sometime before the Middle Ages. This practice , known in scientific circles as lithotherapy spread to Europe, England and America as new trading routes opened and colonial opportunities presented themselves. This study examines briefly the various forms of this folk medical belief and its history in rural America. Curative stones have varied origins. Some like tabasheer, are found in bamboo joints in Southeast Asia. Others, such as diamond, topaz and amethyst, are mined from the earth. Coral and pearl come from the sea while some of the stones are produced in the bodies of animals, particularly ruminants. The uses to which these stones were put varied greatly. Some .were carried in pouches around the neck. Some were carried in other parts of the body to ward off disease. Others were ground into a powder, or blown into the eyes...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

THE MADSTONE Continued from page 16. After more moisturizing, the stone was replaced on the wound and the process repeated until the stone no longer adhered. This was a sign that the poison was all gone from the wound and that the patient would recover. Often the process would take a number of hours and in one Texas case, the stone is said to have worked for 31 hours during which time it dropped off and was relieved of its poison four times. The madstone was a more popular cure for rabies bites than for insect or snake bites because most members of a community knew which insects or snakes were poisonous by experience. However, it was not so easy to distinguish a mad animal from any other animal. There were recognizable signs of madness such as foaming at the mouth, widening of the eyes and unexpected behavior, but one could never be sure. The same holds true today. When . a person is bitten by an animal, scientific tests are run before determining whether the animal is rabid. Before...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

V » I . 3 1 J 1 ... i i > L'u * » t , W PAGE 18 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1985 MOUNTAIN CRAFT: DAISY WEDDLE, QUILTER Mrs. Edward (Daisy Boyd) Weddle lives just off the Blue Ridge Parkway (between mile posts 171 and 172) on the "Black Ridge" Road (state road 726). She lives in the house that was her parents, Cornelius and Martha Pendleton Boyd's before her, in sight of the Floyd/Patrick County line. The area was once known as "Stamping Birches" There was a school house by that name just down the road, and she remembers hearing her parents tell that they used to hold court - not in a building, but out in the open air - within sight of her house. One of her ancestors, Asa Smith was the Justice of the Peace. The mail men from Meadows of Dan and Floyd would meet at the county line and exchange mail for the other's post office. Mrs. Weddle said that in cold weather, the postmen would come in their house and sort the mail by the fire. As Daisy Weddle grew to be a young girl in her te...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

"Where's Sally? With it gettin' so close to her time, she shouldn't be gettin' to far from the house." "Now, Granny-Moma, Sally's a healthy, level headed girl in her prime. No need to worry about that one. Besides, we have a midwife living just over the ridge now who'll get here in just a few minutes if we need her." Old Granny-Moma brushed back the window curtain and scanned the yard for a sight of her grand-daughter. There were three generations of Murphy women in this house now. Granny-Moma and Grand-Papa had built this house and were the ones who originally cleared the land. Grand-Papa died many years ago and their oldest daughter Ellen and her family had moved back home to run the farm for her. Now, Ellen's oldest daughter, Sally, was back home, staying long enough for the baby to be born and she could get back on her feet. Granny-Moma had insisted on it. This was Sally's first baby and she and her husband, Tom, lived too far away from neighbors to take any chances with the bir...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

PAGE 20 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1985 WHERE HAVE ALL THE HOBOS GONE? Waynesboro, Virginia was a good Hobo town when I was a youngster. When the cold winds stopped blowing from the northwest and the southerly winds began to urge new growth of the trees the Hobos would soon appear. I saw my first Hobo in early May of 1931. He was standing near the gate that opened into the alley from our backyard on Grayson Avenue. He almost scared me to death. I was six years old on December 23, 1930, too young to start to school that year, so I was at home with my Mama and two sisters that early May morning in 1931Mama told me to get some wood that Dad had chopped and stacked by the back gate so she could fix fried potatoes and gravy for us for lunch. I had an arm full of wood when I raised up and came face to face with a tall man leaning over the gate. I dropped most of the wood I was holding as I ran for the house to tell Mama. I'll never forget how calmly my Mama told me, "You don't need to be afraid...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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