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Title: Mullumbimby Star Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 76,720 items from Mullumbimby Star, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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ALPINE BRAKE MISHAP. TWELVE SCHOOLGIRLS INJURED. [Newspaper Article] — Mullumbimby Star — 13 September 1906

ALPIN'ju BRAKE. MISHAP; TWF.LVE SCHOOLGIRLS INJURED. From Geneva, on 10th July the corre spondent of the 'Express' wrote:— Twelve schoolgirls and a coachman were severely Injured In a carriage ac cident which occurred yesterday on the mountainous St. Gothard route near tho top of the Realp. Some forty girls from the Zurich High Knhnnl fwrnmnnnipd hv their teachers. left Hospcnthal in several brakes for the Realp, with the Intention of making geo logical studies in the mountains. The four horses of the first brake bolted, and dashed up the mountain road at full speed. At a sharp corner the brake overturned and, with the girls and horses, rolled forty feet down a steep slope, where It was smashed to pieces ogalnst a boulder. The driver and twelve girls were se- ? vere'y injured. Several had legs and arms broken, and others were kicked by the struggling horses, two of which had to be shot afterwards.

Publication Title: Mullumbimby Star
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RAILWAY COLLISION AS SHOW. AMERICAN SENSATION. [Newspaper Article] — Mullumbimby Star — 13 September 1906

RAILWAY COLLISION AS SHOW. AMERICAN SENSATION. The New York correspondent of the London 'Daily Mall' wrote on 5th July:— After a tedious wait of three hours, 40,000 persons witnessed a pre-arranged collision between locomotives at Brigh ton Beach racecourse to-day. A broad track, a quarter of a mile long, had been laid through the paddock, and the locomotives faced each other at ntthpr end. At a signal the engineers pulled the throttles open, jumped clear, and the engines, running at a speed ot 20 miles an hour, crashed into each other midway on the track. The locomotives reared and rocked amid clouds of steam; both left the rails, but neither turned over. Although a marsh separated the wreck from the grandstand, fully 2000 man and women plunged through the water and mire, some up to tlie waist, in a mad de sire to get a closer view of the wrecked locomotives.

Publication Title: Mullumbimby Star
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
[?] WILFRID LAWSON. [?]POSTLE OF TEMPERANCE. APPRECIATIVE NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — Mullumbimby Star — 13 September 1906

mm WILFRID LAWSON. Hj^MpO'STLE OP TEMPERANCE. APPRECIATIVE NOTES. Within a few months o£ thc ripe age of seventy-seiven Sir Wilfrid Lawson has 'passed away. the Irony of fate he, who was Cumberland born and bred, who. (with the Interval of three scattered . years) had sat for Cumberland seats from 1859 ''to 1900, yot sat for some years as the / member of the Camborne division of / Cornwall. From opening date of ser vice entitled to the honorable position j of Father of the House of Commons, j yet his claims have been rendered nu gatory by occasional enforced absences. A staunch Liberal all his days, en dowed with robust common sense, he yet was never able to escape the repu tution of being something. - of a fad dist, 'a crank,' upon his loved cause of temperance. He was always listened to ' in the House, bub he carfied no com mensurate weight in the counsels of the party. Indeed, as a record of things achieved, of high positions held, his life is quickly told. It is the record of th...

Publication Title: Mullumbimby Star
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NOTHING TO STEAL. [Newspaper Article] — Mullumbimby Star — 13 September 1906

NOTHING TO STEAL. 'No,' snapped tho woman with the square chin, 'I don't want no burglar alarms.' 'Then the lady next door was right, I sup pose,' rejoined tho agent as he turned to go. 'What did she say?' queried the squaro chlnned female, somewhat eagerly. 'Oh, she didn't 'say' very much,' answered the agent. 'After purchasing two of : tho alarms sh esald It would be a waste of timo to stop here, as you had nothing worth steal ing.' 'The impudent thing!' exclaimed the other, indignantly. 'Here, give me half a dozen of them alarms.' '

Publication Title: Mullumbimby Star
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LEGAL REMINISCENSES. SOME GOOD STORIES. [Newspaper Article] — Mullumbimby Star — 13 September 1906

LEGAL REMINlSGENSES. SOME GOOD STORIES. Somo interesting reminiscences and good stories appear in Life in the Law,' a volume of recollections by thc late John George Witt;, K:C., Bencher of Lincoln's Inn. As show- ' ing how times and manners hove altered Mr Witt mentions that his father, when twelve years of age, was taken by his schoolmaster, with all tho other boys belonging to tho ?school, from St. Ives to Cambridge . Cnetle to sec one Daniel Dawson hanged for poisoning racohorses at Newmarket. ' The master of tho school.' it seems, ' went to the ex pense and trouble of thc journey in order to demonstrate to his scholars the result of a wicked life.' In t.hesa far-aWav days it was, of course, com mon enough to inculcatc moral pre cepts by awful examples of the conse quences to those who disregarded them. But what would be thought of inarching a school to an execution now ? TURNING THE TABLES. It is not easy for a witness to turn the tables on counsel, but Mr Witt shows that it ca...

Publication Title: Mullumbimby Star
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A POLITE GIRL. [Newspaper Article] — Mullumbimby Star — 13 September 1906

A POLITE GIRL. ^ The little girl had been assiduously .in structed in tho arts and graces of courtesy, and when she told her mamma how tho strange boy at the party had kissed her she did it with a demure, reserved air that would havo delighted her mamma under other cir cumstances. 'And he kissed me,' 6he said. 'Kissed you!' ,tiUe mamma exclaimed, 'And you, Gladys— what, did you do?' 'Mamma, I didn't forgot my politeness, I said, 'Thank you.' '

Publication Title: Mullumbimby Star
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WAR NEWS. IN WAR TIME. [Newspaper Article] — Mullumbimby Star — 13 September 1906

WAR NEWS. IN WAR TIME. Probably every one admits (writes the London 'Times' In June) in the ab- 1 stract the importance of controlling, I and, if need be, restricting, the dissem-1 ination of war news in time of war with ' a Great Power, or when such war is im minent. No one can seriously contem-' plate the unrestricted publicity given in this country in ordinary times to every ! movement of our ships, and to every thing done, or projected, or even sup posed to be projected, by the naval and military authorities, without thinking with a shudder of /the mischief that would be done in ;var were all that in formation continuously afforded to the ' enemy. i It is therefore satisfactory to find that the question of controlling that in formation in the best interests of the nation is being taken up in the proper spirit. At a representative conference of managers and editors of London and provincial newspapers convened by the Newspaper Society, which met yesterday under the presidency of M...

Publication Title: Mullumbimby Star
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WOULD NOT SUIT. [Newspaper Article] — Mullumbimby Star — 13 September 1906

WOULD NOT SUIT. Tho scene was a registry omco. a mistress was endeavoring to engage a maid. 'How many are there in the family?' asl:ed the latter. 'Three. My husband, myself, and daugh ter,' was the reply. ' 'How many afternoons out will you give me?' 'Every second Sunday, and one every week.' 'Shall 1 have any evenings to myself? ! 'Oh, yes. Every Thursday evening,' 'Well, .! think I'll give you a trial for a while, anyway.' 'Oh, thank you. . But just a moment. Do you play the piano?' 'No, mum, I do not.' 'Well, I suppose you can dance, or give dra matic readings from the poets, or something like that?' 'I'm no ac-trcss, inum?'. 'Hum. Can you play a good game of bridge?' 'No, mum. I cannot.' 'Dear me, this is too bad. Out don't you golf or tennis, or go In for athletics generally?' 'I'm no tomboy.' 'Then, I'm afraid you won't do. N No, really you won't do at all. You see, I want some body who will entertain my guests while I do the work.' s

Publication Title: Mullumbimby Star
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SEAWEED PARASOLS. NEW FASHION FROM THE EAST. [Newspaper Article] — Mullumbimby Star — 13 September 1906

SEAWEED PARASOLS. NEW FASHION FROM THE EAST. Sea-weed Is being rut to many pretty usifs this season. Artificial bunches of it provide trimmings for hats, falling in masses of feathery fronds over the brim at the back, or In the form of a tufted wreath decorating the crown. The colorings affected are cool and becoming, and range from the palest brown to a rtpftn nirik. I But not only is imitation sea-weed of ornamental utility. The real weed Is be- I ing employed as the decoration of a parasol, which is the latest novelty in way. Lovely pale coral-pink weed Is chosen; Interspersed with sprays of the tawny7shaded specimen and others that ► re as green as the sea. ' ^e/pry skilfully, by means of impercep tible gum and embroidery stitches, the weed is applied to a background of fine biscuit or pastel-tinted gauze, and then' an outer layer of gauze is placed over it, so that the weed is enshrined. The idea comes from the East, and a pagoda-shaped sunshade is, therefore, very aptly chosen...

Publication Title: Mullumbimby Star
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CAN'T LOCATE SOUNDS. [Newspaper Article] — Mullumbimby Star — 13 September 1906

CAN'T LOCATE SOUNDS. 'If you are'deaf inrone oar,' said the' boiler- maker, 'I don't care, about giving you a job.' 'Why?' asked tli-y applicant. 'Because -yoU^cah't tell what direction sounds come from. ?Henco,. in , a place liko this you would bo^ln great danger.' 'How dd you ktmw l can't -toll what direc tion sounds come from?' the applicant do manded. 'No person deaf in one ear,' replied tho bollermaker, ' 'can do so. A man deaf in one car will look behind him If a gun goes off on his right. He will look up in the air if a child shrieks at his feet. He will look. wildly in front of him if a locomotive whistles In hlB rear. A boiler-shop is no place for such a man.' 'I knew I was liko this,' said the applicant, 'but-r didn't know all half-deaf people were.' 'They all are,' said the boiler-maker, 'and my shop Is no place for them.'

Publication Title: Mullumbimby Star
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SNAKES IN ENGLAND. THE VENOMOUS ADDER. [Newspaper Article] — Mullumbimby Star — 13 September 1906

SNAKES IN ENGLAND. THE VENOMOUS ADDER. The recent fatalities from snakebito have led to the discovery in many places that snakes are more abundant than Is pleasant this year; and from a Devon shire town, Wolland, we hear that a re sident set a trap as an experiment in his garden and caught no fewer than seven snakes, several three feet in lensth. But it - is not possible that full-sized enakes should become more abundant In one year than another, because they are creatures of slow growth from year to year. One might almost as well talk of men and women being unusually abundant this season. What l-a3 happened, of course, is that the adder, our only venomous British leptile, has attracted unusual attention to his class as people are 'finding out that enakes are much commoner, even In gar dens in some districts, than they had ruppased. In the south of England adders are always common wherever the country suits them, being most abundant, per haps, in the wooded, heathery tracts of Susse...

Publication Title: Mullumbimby Star
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
INNSBRUCK. ITS HOLIDAY CHARMS. [Newspaper Article] — Mullumbimby Star — 13 September 1906

INNSBRUCK. ' ITS HOLIDAY CHARMS. The fact that King Edward may pos sibly visit Ischl this year calls attention to one of the most attractive and the most curious corners of Europe — the Austrian Tyrol, the capital of which is the quaint old town of Innsbruck. I No part of Europe is still so much dominated in the little Incidents of daily life by the traditions of the past as the Tyrol. Until recently the Tyrol was quite out of tho. beaten track of Euro pean travel, which accounts for the sur vival of custom and tradition which have long since disappeared in other parts by contact with outside influences. In the southern part of the country the names of the mountains and valleys have come down straight from the times of the Etruscans, who were driven thither by the conquering bands of the Latin tribes invading Italy. Later In vaders, the Romans and the old German tribes, have also left remarkably well preserved vestiges, and nowhere has the antiquary or historian a better chance o£ u...

Publication Title: Mullumbimby Star
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WOMAN'S FIRST DUTY. QUEEN MARCHERITA ON RACE SUICIDE. [Newspaper Article] — Mullumbimby Star — 13 September 1906

WOMAN'S FIRST DUTY. QUEEN MARGHER1TA ON RACE ! SUICIDE. I Queen Mnigherlta of Italy Is em phatically not on the side of those who hold advanced theories of woman's rights. In an Interview ia the 'Gentle- , woman' she put lier opinions on record In no uncertain terms. | 'I am absolutely opposed to any ex travagant theories of what is called the emancipation qt women,' she said. 'In whatever condition of life a woniau may be placed her first duty is the negative one of not giving up the quali ties that distinguish her sex. Above all, she should guard against developing the traits of men. A bending of ancient/ reserve with modern indopeudeuci/ would givfc us tlie Ideal woman.' ?' Her Majesty believes lu large fami lies. How else, she nsks, Is a nation io I . progress except through its people? A ! childless family is incomplete. There is ! -a poetry aud a pathos about childhood which 'appeal to every rlght-hearfed woman. Most women, though they may not be able to put this idea into wor...

Publication Title: Mullumbimby Star
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BELATED INQUEST. AFTER SEVEN MONTHS. [Newspaper Article] — Mullumbimby Star — 13 September 1906

BELATED INQUEST. AFTER SEVEN MONTHS. i An inquest was opened on 0th July , at the District Council Offices, Buck- j hurst I-Iill, Essex, on ihe body of Mrs Elizabeth Oliver, who died on 1st December last. She was buried in St. John's cimvnli yard, Buckhurst Hill, on 7th December, and the body was exhumed on Thurs day night last at the instance of Dr Alexander Ambrose, coroner for the metropolitan portion of Essex. ' The coroner said the case was one of some perplexity, and that the medical examination of the body would extend over two months. Only formal evi dence of identification was taken, and tlie inquest adjourned until 21th Sep tember, the coroner cautioning tha jury men not to discuss the case or listen to any discussion of it in the meantime. Dr Adams, who attended Mrs Oliver during her illness, was in court, and was represented by a solicitor. |

Publication Title: Mullumbimby Star
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
USEFUL HINTS. [Newspaper Article] — Mullumbimby Star — 13 September 1906

USEFUL HINTS. Grilled Fish.— Required: Two or three* good fresh fish, a little butter, pepper and salt, chopped herbs, a little lemon. Take the fish that you wish to use, clean and split it down the back, remove the back bone. Have the gridiron fairly hot, lay the fish on it, and cook till half done. Grease a fireproof dish, mix a little but ter with pepper, salt, and chopped pars ley; spread thils Inside the dish. Set the fish on the dish and cook in a moderate oven for seven minutes, squeeze a little lemon over, garnish with slices of lemon, and serve at once. Cold Darioles of Fowl. — Required: Half-pint brown aspic jelly, one hard boiled egg, some thin slices of cold fowl, a liittle lean ham, chopped parsley, pickled gherkins. Take for these some small, plain moulds, cover the bottom half-inch thick with brown aspic jelly, and put into each a teaspaonful of chop ped hard-boiled egg, set very lightly with jelly, and when firm fill up the moulds loosely with thin slices of cooked j...

Publication Title: Mullumbimby Star
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE LADIES' COLUMN. [Newspaper Article] — Mullumbimby Star — 13 September 1906

THE KADIES' COLUMN. [?]

Publication Title: Mullumbimby Star
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WIT AND HUMOR. [Newspaper Article] — Mullumbimby Star — 13 September 1906

WIT AND HUMOR. The Young man (enthusiastically): ,rI sn?! who is that beautiful womnn hero? Do you kuow her?' Tho Older Ono: 'I don't, though I've been married to her for tho last flvo years!' Kind Lady: Poor man! Wouldn't you liko a nice chop? IThe Man (suspiciously): What kind of a chop, lady— lamb or wood? Assistant: What shall I put under the bride's picture? She's homely as a mud fence. Editor: In that case we always say 'accom- plished.' . 'This man,' explained tho hospital doctor, 'is the victim of athletics.' 'Ah, overtrained, I suppose.' 'No, ho never trained a bit. Tho fellow jvho hit him had, though.' Father (sternly): So you'vo failed again in !/our examinations! How do you explain that? Son: Because they went and asked mo just the samo questions as bororo. 'You said you w.ero fond of active, outdoor sport,' remarked the athletic girl. 'So I am,' answered the lazy man in thc hammock: 'but not all of them. The sports I liko are skating and throwing snow balls.' - 'You did...

Publication Title: Mullumbimby Star
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ST. MICHAEL, CORNHILL. [Newspaper Article] — Mullumbimby Star — 13 September 1906

ST. MICHAEL, CORNHILL. St. Michael, Comhili, into the rectory of which the Bishop o£ Loudon litis just iuducted his old headmaster, is particu larly associated with the indefatigable antiquary, John Stow, to whom we owe our knowledge of niedisuval London. This church (writes the 'Westminster Gazette'), lias always been famous for Its bells, which were anciently rung by the citizeus to scare the liends in thun derstorms. During one of these tem pests 'an ugly, shapen sight appeared' to the ringers, 'for fear whereof they all fell down, and lay as dead.' Stow, who was bom in the parish, naively corroborates the story by saying that he had ''oft seen certain stones scrat as with a lyou's claw.' The steeple of St. Michael's Is a fair imitation, rebuilt l).v Wren, of the glorious tower of Magda le'i College, Ox lord,

Publication Title: Mullumbimby Star
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A JUDGE'S SLIP. [Newspaper Article] — Mullumbimby Star — 13 September 1906

A JUDGE'S SLIP. A man was before a Tukesbury Court tho other day charged with stealing some fancy ducks. Thc Magistrate languidly listened to the fancier's loug description of the stolen pro perty, sniffed the air, and then remarked:— 'Why, those ducks can't -be so very valu able—of such a rare breeB— I have somo of them in my own yard.' Tho complainant turned red and exclaimed: 'I stated, your Honor, that the ducks found in the prisoner's possession were not the only .ones I'd missed.'

Publication Title: Mullumbimby Star
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HAS HIS NAME REGISTERED. [Newspaper Article] — Mullumbimby Star — 13 September 1906

HADP HIS NAME REGISTERED. A gentleman travelling in Europe engaged thc services of a courier. Arriving at an inn in Austria the traveller asked his servant to enter his name .in accordance with the polico regulations' oP'tfiat country. The. man re plied that. ho had already anticipated the order, and registered him as an American gentleman of means. 'But how did you write my name?' askod thc master. \. 'I can't expetly' pronounce it, but I copied, it carefully from your portmaneau, sir.' 'But it is not there,' was the reply. 'Bring nio the book. 'Thc register was' brought, and revealed, instead of a very piaiu English namo of two -syllables, the following portentous en try: 'Monsieur Warranted Solid Leather.'

Publication Title: Mullumbimby Star
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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