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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

itPHPi)fp-SHPiWllWWrw'MPW!'" " TFSVFlWi!J-'',w"i,'!,(WPW THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. GO broader meaning than it had fifty years ago. And possibly some especially keen-witted reader has already begun to question whether the word "brandy" means what it meant fifty years ago. Potato alcohol, beet-root alcohol and the other vicious alcohols are to-day freely manufactured in answer to the demand of a large and growing market. We may safely say that the brandies, whiskies, rums or gins which three fourths of the people drink are made from these poisonous alcohols. The word is well chosen poisonous so proven, positively, virulently poison ous. lnlS87, Dr. Labordeand Dr. Magnan presented to the Paris Society of Medi cine the results of a thorough analysis of these alcohols. Among the chemi cal constituents of the still unbaptized brandy or whiskey or gin these patient analysts found "pyromuric aldehyde," better known as "furfurol." This is a violent poison, a known provocative of epilepsy. Sudden ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

70 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. of wine-lees." Through the oxidation of castor-oil, butter, cocoa, etc,, the chemist obtains certain acids: caprilic acid, caproic acid, etc. Under pres sure these are etherized with ethylic. amylic and propylic alcohols. With these various ethers, and a good supply of villainous alcohol, you can crowd a bar or stock a cellar with brandies and whiskies or whatever else you please. A few drops of the ether will flavor a large volume of the alcohol. There are qualities in "bouquets." For com mon folks there are ordinary stuffs; but if you are particular, you can get a superior article. The fine "bouquets" are compounded out of nitro-benzine, prussic acid, essence of bitter almonds, benzonitril, lactate of methyl. Nor has the modern trader or chemist neglected the favorite cordials or the popular "bitters." A sugared mixture and a few drops of the proper cordial "essence," and you have vermouth, or absinthe, or noyau. Drs. Magnan and Laborde analyzed these "esse...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 71 r is not the same liquor and that the word "drunkard" has a terribly changed moaning. Systems of sewage, of ven tilation, of plumbing, of rapid transit, of land tenure or taxation, are of small import compared with the question of chemist's alcohol. We cling fondly to old traditions and to old "saws." Witness the ''light wine" tradition, and the old "saws," "If you would correct the evil of intem perance, encourage the use of light wines." In the past there was wisdom in the saying. To-day 'hero is none. Where are you to get your wine, light or heavy? Cheap or dear "somethings" called wines you may have but let us try to learn more about the wine of the period. You know what a fatal enemy of the grape the phylloxera proved to be. The French vines suffered severely. Among great and small, in the Cote d'Or as well as in the Gironde, the phylloxera blighted the grape. The crops grew less and less and the vintner poorer and poorer. Something had to be done. M. Po...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

72 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. The crops were not always largo enough to supply everybody. There was nothing to do but call on the chemist. Of course, everything that honest men could do had already been done. The "good Rhine wine" had been watered and vinified; the California wines had been imported, mixed, and vinefied. But, still it was impossible to make enough of "light wine." A doctor with the pleasing name of Gall came to the rescue. Now, when the grape has been harvested, the most ;f the meanest, poorest grapes along the river is gathered into great vats. A soapy looking substance, manufactured from potatoes, is mixed with the must, and the pump is turned on. Water is not added absolutely ad lib., but it is added in amount sufficient to assure much more than the normal quantity of wine. Compared with the ordinary brandy or whiskey of commerce, the first "brew" of Dr. Gall's Rhine wine may be commended, on account of its "light ness." But when we get down to wash No. 4 or No. 5, wou...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

'HIS INDIAN ADVOCATE. 73 TUtc Idiar ZSdVocate Is a Quarterly Review, published by tbc Benedictine Fathers of the Indian Tor., to plead the cause of the bust remnants of Indian tribes, and to give a history of their progress toward dvllfrntloti. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of each tribe; their progress in education and religion, their occupa tions, Industries, schools, etc., etc. Alo, 11 history of our mis sions, statistics, and other Interesting matter that can not be found in any other publication. The proceeds of this Review will be used for educating and converting the Indians of the Territory. Till IN'DIAN ADVOCATi:, Sacred Heart I. 0 , Okla. Tor. Ai'i'RovhD iiy Right Rkv THKO. MKI:rschai:RT, Vicak Apostolic or Oklahoma and Indian Tfkkitohy. A Quarterly Km iow, entered at the Sacred Heart Post Ollire in Oklahoma Territory, as second-class matter. Subscription C0 Cent per l'mr. Stn(te Copies 15 Cents. JULY, 1898. Editorial and Local. To advance by sneaki...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

74 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. While we "keep step to the music of the Union," let us not forget that wo have a higher duty in avoiding malice, vengeance, hatred and uncharitable ness. God only looks to pure, and not to full hands. The humblest soul pro jects itself beyond the stars, but the mightiest nation casts no shadow in eternity Fabcr. Decoration Day was celebrated in grand style here. Patriotic music, soul stirring speeches find a long procession to the cemeteries, were the order of the day. Rev. Father Hilary Cassal, 0. S. B., has become a New Yorker pro tern. He takes the place of the Rev. Rector, of St. Joseph's Church, during the Let ter's absence in Europe. When the royal prophet said that all men were liars, he was evidently gifted with a prophetic view of the daily journals which issue extra editions of their sheets. If Butler was correct when he wrote: "The pleasure is as great of being cheated as to cheat," then the public must be getting a large amount of happiness just n...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

!; i ji.-ipiwi.il i pmmjm wpiyyi 'wni iilMw"'"'iE,r''''wWB,li8'T' Jl -Wjy WJUPWWMW W,WlHm.HWPlJI THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 75 FORCING THEM ALONG. No matter how much we, and others, ' may differ with ex-Agent Baldwin, of Anadarko, in regard to his policy of retaining the earth and the fullness thereof for the benefit of a handful of Indians, yet no fair minded man will deny him just credit for intelligent and effectual methods of securing a marked progress in the condition of the Indians on the Kiowa and Comanche reserva tions. That is his purpose, and he is successful in it, although it involves a consequent sacrifice of interest in sev eral other directions. As evidence of this success we append a few items of finance and population that may sur prise many of our readers. At the Anadarko agency by a census of 1897, there are exactly 3,786 Indians, segre gated as follows: Comanches 1 ,520 Kiowas '. 1 ,10o A pachus 107 Wiehitas, Uaddos, ule 058 3,780 This table does not include the 300 Ge...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

76 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. This is quite a sum of money destri buted annually among 2,928 Indians, but it is their own earnings and the revenue from lenses on their own reser vation. Much of this money is held to their credit by the Agent, with their approval, and is expended on call for building houses, the purchase of extra wagons, improved stock of animals, machinery and material not furnished by the government and such things as their advanced condition demands. During this summer these Indians have built 184 new dwellings, the government supplying the lumber and each Indian paying $50 for the wages of a carpenter in constructing the house. Agent Baldwin is pushing this work to the utmost, encouraging labor and improve ment among them by employment and prompt payment, and punishing the shiftless by withholding favors. In a few more years of this policy he con tends he can have every family located on a cultivated farm, with comfortable homes, plenty of stock, and all neces sary imp...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 77 are now on reservations in South and North Dakota. According to the official report for 1803, the Sioux within the United States number about 23,410, which with 600 permanently settled in Mani toba, make the whole population about 24,000 souls. The Sioux, under the name of Nadouessi, are mentiond by the Jesuit missionaries as early as 1632. They made their first treaties with our gov ernment in 1815. The most prominent events in their history since that date have been the treaty of Prairie du Chien in 1S25, which defined their eastern boundary and stopped the westward advance of the Ojibwa; the Minnesota massacre in 1862, which resulted in the expulsion of the Sioux from Minnesota; the Sioux war of 187G 77, largely con sequent on the unauthorized invasion of the Blackhills by miners, and the chief incident of which was the defeat and massacre of an entire detachment under General Custer; the treaty by which the great reservation was broken up in 18S9, and the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

78 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ' TECUMSEH. "These lnnds are ours. No one 1ms a right to remove us, because we were the iirst owners." Tecumseh io Well, JS07. "The President may sit still in his town and drink his wine, while you and I will have to tight it out." Tennmch to Jlarrisou, 1S10. Tecumseh, the most heroic character of Indian history, was the son of a chief, and the worthy scion of a warrior race. His tribe, the Shawnee, made it their proud boast that they of all tribes had opposed the most determined re sistance to the encroachments of the whites. His father had fallen under the bullets of the Virginians while lead ing his warriors at the bloody battle of Point Pleasant in 1774. His eldest brother had lost his life in an attack on a southern frontier post, and another had been killed fighting by his side at Wayne's victory in 1794. What won der that the young Tecumseh declared that his flesh crept at the sight of a white man! But his was no mean spirit of per sonal revenge; his m...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

mmmNmumw J' npjupnyp fppppiwiifpwipw '"' THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 79 gion und the groat northwest, all wrought up to the highest pitch of ex citement over the prospect of a revival of the old Indian life and the perpetua tion of aboriginal sovereignty. This was Tecumseh's opportunity, and he was quick to improve it Even those who doubted the spiritual revelations could see that they were in danger from the continued advances of the whites, and were easily convinced that safety required that they should unite as one people for the preservation of a com mon boundary. The pilgrims carried back these ideas to their several tribes, and thus what was at first a simple re ligious revival soon became a political agitation. They were equally patriotic from the Indian point of view, and under the circumstances one was almost the natu ral compliment of the other. All the evidence goes to show that the move ment in its inception was purely re ligious and peaceable, but the military spirit of Tecums...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

n 80 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. without effect. The new settlement, which was on the Western bank of the river just below the mouth of the Tip pecanoe, was known to the Indians as "the great clearing, and was an old I and favorite location with them. It I had been the site of a large Shawnee i village which had been destroyed by the Americans in 1791, and some years later the Pottawotami had rebuilt upon , the same place, to which they now in vited the disciples of the new religion, i The whites had corrupted the name to 1 Tippecanoe, and it now generally be came known as the Prophet's town. Nothing else of moment occurred dur- ' ing this year, but it was learned that i Tecumseh contemplated visiting the southern tribes in the near future to enlist them also in his confederacy. In J 809, however, rumors of an approach- ing outbreak began to fill the air, and it was evident that the British were in stigating the Indians to mischief in an ticipation of a war between England and the United S...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

THE LNDJAN ADVOCATE. 81 mattor, the Great Spirit would put sense ' into his head to induce him to give up I tho lands, adding, "It is true he is so far oil ho will not be injured by the war. He may sit still in his town and drink his wine, while you and I will have to fight it out." Tho governor then requested that in the event of an Indian war Tecumseh would use his in- i (luence to prevent the practice of cruel- I ties on women and children and de fenseless prisoners. To this he readily agreed, and the promise was faithfully kept. The conference had ended with a tacit understanding that war must come, and both sides began to prepare for the struggle. Soon after it was learned that tho prophet had sent belts to the tribes west of the Mississippi, inviting them to join in a war against the United States. Outrages on the Indians by tho settlers intensified the hostile feeling, and the Delawares re fused to deliver up a murderer until some of the whites who had killed their people wer...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

82 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. the great spirit has sent me. You shall know. I leave Tuckabachi directly and shall go straight to Detroit. When I arrive there I will stamp on the ground with my foot and shake down every house in Tukabachi.' So saying he turned and loft the Big Warrior in utter amazement at both his man ner and his threat, and pursued his journey. The Indians were struck no less with his conduct than was the Big Warrior, and began to dread the ar rival of the day when the threatened calamity would befall them. They met often and talked over this matter, and counted the days carefully to know the day when Tecumseh would reach De troit. The morning they had fixed upon as the day of his arrival at last came. A mighty rumb ling was heard the Indians all ran out of their houses the earth began to shake; when at last, sure enough, every house in Tukabachi was shaken down. The exclamation was in every mouth, "Tecumseh has got to Detroit." The effect was electric. The message he ha...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

mimimmmwl,''im""mft '" pppppp IfPPW THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 83 did not dare to resent. The retreat was begun with Harrison in close pur suit, until the British and Indians reached a spot on the north bank of the Thames, in the vicinity of the present Chatham, Ontario. Hero, finding the ground favorable for defence, Tecumseh resolved to retreat no farther, and practically compelled Proctor to make a stand. The Indian leader held no hope of triumph in the issue. His sun had gone down, and he felt himself already standing in the shadow of death. He was done with life and desired only to close it, as became a warrior, strik ing a last blow against the hereditary enemy of his race. When he had posted his men, he called his chiefs about him and calmly said: " Brother warriors, we are now about to enter into an engagement from which I shall never come out my body will remain on the field of battle." He then unbuckled his sword and placing it in the hands of one of them, said: "When my son bec...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

84 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. the great Inca dominion in South Amer ica represented at and ruled from Cuzco, the central city and province of them all. It thus happened that, although one or another of the Zuni subtribes was at different times partially and temporarily conquered by the Spaniards they were never as a whole people sub dued; and although missions and chapels were ultimately established at one and another of their towns by the Franciscan friars, they were never all of them immediately under mission influence and surveillance at any one time until a comparitively recent date. The evidences and tragic consequences of this may be traced throughout the history of Spanish intercourse, and as the measure of its effect in minimizing the influence of Spanish thought and example on Zuni culture and habits is of great importance in determining to what extent the following sacred myths may be regarded as purely aboriginal, a brief outline of this history is regar ded as desirable. OUTLI...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

THE TNDIAN ADVOCATE. 85 force of soldiers and priests, after their general tour of formal conquest in the other Pueblo provinces, were met as they approached the Zuni towns by delegations of singing priests and war riors, and were received with such showers of white prayer-meal on enter ing that they had to protect themselves from these offerings, as they supposed, of peace. This incident and that of the ceremonial hunt and feast given them afterward, signifies conclusively the estimation in which, up to that time, the Spaniards had been held by the priestly elders of Zuniland. Pre cisely as the returning Iva'kakwo, or mythic-dance dramatists, personating gods and heroes of the olden time are received twice yearly, (before and after the harvest growth and time) so were these soldiers and friars received, not as enemies, nor as aliens, but as veri table god's or god-men, coming forth at the close of autumn from out the land of day, whence come the ripening breaths of the Frost gods! ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

86 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. thorn, was transfixed by many arrows. Thus speedily was slain the first resident priest of Zuni; thus were the Zuni themselves disillusionized of their belief in the more than mortal power of the Spaniard and the deific character of his religion; for they broke up the ornaments of the altar, burned the church, and then sallied forth to follow Fray Martin. They overtook him at night five days later, attacked his party while in camp, overawed and killed outright his two soldiers, and, joined by his traitorous "Christian Indians" one of whom, a half blood, cut off his hand and scalped him, they killed also this venerable friar and hastened back to their town. There the ceremonial of the scalp dan ces of initiation were performed over the scalps of the two friars, an obser vance designed both as a commemora tion of victory and to lay the ghosts of the slain by completing the count of their unfinished days and making them members by adoption of the ghostly tribe o...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 87 Nevertheless, it seems highly probable that other Zunis, if not indeed some of the townspeople themselves, had to do with the tragic affair just related, for there is no evidence that, although the people of Hawik'uh were numer ous, any of them came to the rescue of the father, or that their town was sacked, whereas the church was plun dered and burned. They do not seem, however to have done injury to the priest of Halona, for just previously to the summer of 1680 when they in common with all the other Pueblo Indians, joined in the revolt against Spanish rule and religion, they wore tolerating the presence of Fray Juan de Bal at this town and of another priest, it seems, at Hawik'uh. When the message strands of that great war magician, Pope of Taos, who had planned the rebellion and sent forth the knotted strings of invitation and warning, were received by the Zunis, their leaders of one accord con sented to join the movement and sped the war strands farther ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

7 88 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. the enemy not uncommonly practiced by the Indians in time of hostility. Be this as it may, the Zunis abandoned all their towns in the valley and taking the good priest with them, fled yet again to the top of their high Mountain of Thunder. Around an ample amphi theater near its southern rim, they rebuilt six or seven great clusters of stone houses and renewed in the mini ature vales of the mesa summit the reservoirs for rain and snow, and on the crests above the trickling spring under their towns, and along the upper reaches of the giddT trail by which the heights were scaled thej' reared arch er's booths and heaps of sling-stones and munitions of heavy rock. There, continually providing for the conflict which they knew would sooner or later reach even their remote fast nesses (as speedily it began to reach the Rio Grande country), they abode securely for more than ten years, living strictly according to the ways of their forefathers, worshiping only the be...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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