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Elephind.com contains 1,012 items from Labor Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 11 November 1916

THE LABOR ADVOCATE Trade Union Health Insurance A Strong Editorial by Samuel Gompers, President of the American Federation of- Labor, in the American Federationist for November. Provisions to meet emergencies! and the misfortunes of life are nart)f every intelligent plan of life. Among the ma jority of the people whose opportunities for saving arc meagre, these provisions take the iorm of some kind of insurance. 1'or wage-earners the term of social in surance is cmplojcil. Proper rcgaid for human life has lesultccl in geneial en dorsement of social insurance and in sistance upon the establishment of .some such system for wage-earners. .Many proposals have been submitted by those interested in social insurance under state supervision, but wage-earners have not looked with favor upon the suggestion that social insurance shall be given over as the domain of the government, there by delegating to the government the right of supervision anil control of the private life of individuals and...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 11 November 1916

-jrj Ae'l THE LABOR ADVOCATE The Ideals of Labor An Interesting and Instructive Article By John P. Frye, Editor of The Molders' Journal. It has seemed to some superficial ob servers that organized labor's ideals consist of nothing inorc.than higher and higher wages, shorter hours of labor, -more and more control, and additional rules and regulations affecting employ ment. Perhaps the ideals which have guided the trade union movement of our coun try arc not generally known to the pub lic because trade unionists have been busily engaged in working for their at tainment rather than in crystallizing them into set phrases. In discussing Labor's ideals, or the ideals of any other group, it must be borne in mind that human activities are influenced by more than one motive and that it may be possible to lose sight of the ideals which have influenced men because it appears that other motives also actuated them. We justly honor and approve of the ideals of freedom and independence which influ...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 11 November 1916

THE LABOR ADVOCATE I,, wlicrc llic income was $211 or niori. And analyzing still further it was fomul that where the fathers were business or pro fessional men the infant mortality was hut 11 per thousand. Among the higher paid workers the death rate rose to 71, while in the families of the less skilled and low paid, the infant death rate rose to 101. In a residential ward of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, wheic comfoit and wealth abound, the infant mortality was but .")() per thousand, while in the tenement dis trict wheic the lower paid workers were foiced to live, the death rate was i!71 per thousand. . The report of the medical officer of Kinsbtiry. London, for l!)U(i, shows that the death rate of adults in the one room tenements was II!) per thousand while in the four-room tenements and upwards, it was but sixteen and four tenths per thousand. This same report also indicated that the infant mortality in the onc-ioom tenements was 'll per thousand while in the four-room tenements it w...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 11 November 1916

8 THE LABOR ADVOCATE This Looks Like Republicans Claim to Be Sore Over a Secret Keepers. Candidates Friendly to Liquor Between League and Party is Certain, 'Tis Given to Cox Hess and Schwenck Accused More fuel to the llatic of indiKiiatibn .iKainst the liquor interests exhibited li the Republican organization was. Iicapid on jesterday bj the discover) of a secret circular sent to saloon keepers Novem ber 4, the Saiurda) before election. Not onl) do William F. Hess, Executive from the Eleventh Ward, and Fred Schwenk, President of the Second Ward Repub lican Club, come "under the ban" for al leged party treachery, but the name of Louis Kinkenbcrgcr. Councilman-at-Largcand President of Hamilton Coun ty Liquor League, was added to the list b) the angr) Republicans. Aji open split between the organiza tion and the Liquor League is regarded as almost certain. None of the men ac cused of dislo)alt) to the Republican party denies having supported Cox, but no one was suspected of having com ...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 11 November 1916

THE LABOR ADVOCATE Miners Organize An Interesting Article In The Federationist, By Edward L. Doyle, Secretary -Treasurer District IS, U. M. W. The miners of the southern coal field of Colorado have seen that there is no chance fortheni (o protect themselves under the industrial plan that was put into effect in the mines of the Colorado Fuel and Iron Company. They have always regarded it as a joke anil none of them will speak of it in a serious manner; they laugh at the promises made under it and attend meetings in the same way they would go to any gathering out of curiosity. The facts arc that the men are join ing the United Mine Workers of Amer ica and the significant thing about it is that they arc doing so on their own ac count. They formed groups and after they had enough to warrant the organ izing of a local, sent word for some of the officers to attend the meetings and decided at such meetings to apply for a charter. The first organization was f.ormcd at Sopris. In four meetin...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 11 November 1916

1 ( I J THE LABOR ADVOCATE "i " "- Building Contracts, Contractors and Sub - Contractors Residence linck anil plaster Inin palow. to be built at SI. I Ajlcsboro ac niic. Jljde Park East Owner, William JlcitT'man; architects Stewart & Stew art. Hell Mock, Cincinnati, O. Contracts awarded as follows Carpenter work, hil Honc-cutt; iron work, II. Ley & Co.; tile, .Maitina Mosaics Co ; concrete work, II, H Steel; roolinjr, A Urami & Co ; IllastcrillL'. Win linilrnliin : linr.l- wood floors, the Enterprise Lmiibcr Co , cut stone, Geo Kasselmann ; plumbing, W X Jenny: bruk work, George Cor- iiii-iii:; eiecinc worK, tlie Ifcltzlioo-cr J-icctnc Lo ; painting, 1!. Griggs, Residence Alterations in and addi tion to residence at Obsenatory road and Dimcan avLiitic Owner, J II. Dim can , architects, Tictig & Lee, Fourth National Hank IJuilding, Cincinnati, O General contract awarded to the Wilmer Htiilding Co , plastering to Robert Ru dolph, and excavation and concrete work to W J...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 11 November 1916

THE LABOR ADVOCATE II 1 :t THE RAILROAD WAGE liy Scott Neakino. There is :i general feeling about the country that railroad wages arc .high. And why should they not he? The hours of railroad work arc long. Many of the tasks involve heavy physical la Lor. The risks of railroading arc ex cessive. The room at the top, in the railroad industry, is unusually narrow, even in these days of narrowing oppor tunity. The railroader, it would seem, is en titled to a generous compensation if ever any wage-earner was. VET RAILROAD WACliS ARE EXTREMELY SMALL. This fact was frankly admitted by the railroads themselves "in their recent answer to the request of the brother hoods for the cHit-hour day. "We can not reasonably grant this request," they insisted. "You arc already getting more than your share of railroad wages; the other railroad wage-earners arc at pres ent underpaid; if wc increase your wages it will involve a further discrimi nation against them." It does not take an expert to sec at a...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 11 November 1916

12 THE-LABOR. ADVOCATE liAW TO FIX THK CASK. Oklahoma City, Okla. The theater strike in progress here for two months reached a crisis recently when the city commissioners passed an ordinance pro hibiting picketing in front of publi' buildings. The penalty for violation is a fine of not less than $10 nor more than $50 and confinement for not exceeding :i() days or both. Commissioner Street and Mayor Ovcrholscr arc both owners of theaters, Street's theater being affected by the strike. HOYS AM) r;iltl,S WIX STKIKK. New York. Right hundred boys and girls employed !" the necktie industry have been on strike for several days. An adjustment has been reached be tween representatives of the union they organized and the National Men's Neckwear Association, and the young sters have returned to work, having se cured a reduction in hours and in creased wages. The hours hereafter will be 54 per week and time, and a half for overtime. Minimum wages for all mem bers of the union will be $0 per wee...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 18 November 1916

,:: ) ptate t .IVERSITY SJdIARY INDEPENDENT NONPARTISAN ?W Official Organ of the Building Trades Council of Cincinnati and Vicinity CINCINNATI, OHIO, NOVEMBER 18, 1916 Vol. IV. No. 31 One Dollar a Year ,--, . I --- - '' SVMNSttJiMilff&ESoiifc-" hi - i Trying To Break "The Big Four" Opponents of Secretary Morrison of the American Federation of Labor Work Hard to Defeat Him. J. W. Hays, Secretary of the Typos, Groomed for the Job. It Will Take 11,000 Votes to Beat Morrison, but His Long Service is Helping Him. News of the Convention. Baltimore, Mil. The last resolution was handed in at 7 o'clock last night at Room 102, Hotel Renncrt, American organized labor's nerve center for the next two weeks; the four leaders of the brotherhood of trainmen were expected in the city, fresh from an unsatisfactory conference in New York with the rail road managers; the forces that would bring to an end Secretary Frank Mor rison's twenty years' service as secre tary of the Federation and member of...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 18 November 1916

7 rr V THE LABOR ADVOCATE 'I'O HKAK UXIOX CASKS .lOIXTIiV Hut Supioine Court Fixes Xn Date On West Virginia Suits. Washington, D. C The Supreme Court has been asked to assign for "hearing on December 4 two cases in volving organized labor, and particu larly the right of workmen to organize unions. Both cases are from West Virginia, in litigation of the Hitchtuau Coal and Coke Company against the United Mine Workers and its officers, and of the Eagle Glass Manufacturing Coin lany against the American -Flint Glass Workers' Union and its officers. The latter cae was reached on the court's docket recently, but request was filed to postpone the hearing until Decem ber A, with the United Mine Workers' cae The court agreed to hear the mine and glass workers' cases together, but set no date. In the United Mine Workers' suit validity of a. finding by Federal Judge Dayton that the union is an illegal or ganization is appealed from. In the Glass Workers' Union case the Eagle Company, of Wellsb...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 18 November 1916

THE LABOR ADVOCATE RAY ECK ECK BROTHERS WALTER ECK Florists and Decorators Office, Canal 5157, Rei. West 3082-Y 1231 VINE STREET, CINCINNATI, 0. Phones: Wilson That's All That Defeated Willis. Jim Faulkner, the Political Expert of The En quirer, Cleverly Tells How the "Good Young Governor" Fixed the Law, So That the Presidential Nominee Would Have to Pull Him Thro, and How He Fell Down On His Own Scheme. As oblivion beckons for this distin guished son of the academic halls of Ada, it is fitting to adduce certain facts to furnish the excuse for the story of the steer-compelled farmer. Should anyone seek to know the cause of the recent cataclysmic concatenation in Ohio politics the sole reply must he: "Wilson; that's all!" Which, expanded to meet general application, means that if was President Wilson who, by means of his imposing plurality, pulled through Governor James M. Cox, United States Senator Atlee Pomcrcnc and the whole "kit and bilin' " of the Democratic array. Had it not be...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 18 November 1916

.Tm-J2 & K THE LABOR ADVOCATE INDEPENDENT NONPARTISAN -sfi, - "!J5' A PAPER FOR. ALL WHO TOIL Oillcinl Organ of The ltiiildlng Trades Council or Cincinnati and Vicinity Issued Weekly W. E. MYERS Editor Business Office, 20-21 Thorns Building. Phone, Canal 5511 Communications should be on hand not later than Wed nesday to insure publication. m0 Entered at the postoflkc at Cincinnati, Ohio, as second class mail matter. ONE DOLLAR A YEAR IN ADVANCE "ftggs CINCINNATI, OHIO, NOVEMBER 18, 1916 ANY OLD TIME WILL DO. Maybe Clias. E. Hughes, attorney-at-law, is .canning his con gratulations. IT WILL BREAK OUT. Even the silence around Oyster Bay is getting loud enough to be heard. TWO POETIC LINES. Has anybody heard anything from Mr. Taft, Except to ponder how he must have laft. AH, COME ACROSS. If somebody don't congratulate soon, lots of good law-abiding citizens who have bets will also have heart disease. IN A BOXING SENSE. Chairman Wilcox says it will take the "official count" to de te...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 18 November 1916

THE LABOR ADVOCATE ffl A Protest Against Working Labor Men Seven Days Per Week By Charles Field Secretary, the Federal Council of Shall an industry which already em ploys its men twelve hours per day in jobs which require great physical en durance he permitted to work these men seven days per week throughout the en tire year? This in substance is the question which the State Industrial Commission of New York has been called upon to determine. The Lackawanna Steel Company just outside of Buffalo, and employing 7,000 men has asked for exemption from the one-day's-rest-in-seven law. It desires the Commission to legalize its present unlawful practice of employing its men continuously. The final disposition of this matter is of importance not only to the men employed in the steel plant, but to every workingman throughout the country. No objection is made to continuous operations in such departments as are of necessity run continuously because of technical reasons we protest against the m...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 18 November 1916

-"'HiwWH'Wl.lF'iW'.,-'t ft' f ftftrj-s I THE LABOR ADVOCATE Federation In Convention at Baltimore, Denounces Compulsory Reg- ' ulation of Industrial Relations Limits Arbitration. Only Property and Property Rights Arbitral, Says Report. lialtimorc. Tlic annual report of the executive council of the American Fed eration of Labor was the most important feature of the opening clay of the thirty sixth annual convention of (he federa tion. One of the striking features of the report, read this afternoon, was the denunciation of what was called an "es sential feature" of 1'rcsidcnt Wilson's proposals for Icislation. This was the creation of "compulsory governmental institutions to regulate industrial rela tions in an occupation now owned or operated by the Government itself." This was declared to be "a revolution ary proposition totally out of harmony with our prevailing institutions and out of haimouy with our philosophy of gov ernment. The wage-earners of the United States will oppose any...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 18 November 1916

THE, LABOR ADVOCATE K FEDERATION OF LABOR Kxpoclcd to Aid Hnllioiid Kniploycs in i:iKlil-ll(Hir PIrIiI. U.illimorc, Mil, Nov. Hi. President Samuel Gompeis, of the Amciican Ked eration of Labor, today received tele grams from.tlic heads of the four rail road l-rotherhoods, savin;; they e)ccted to address the federation convention next iVoud.iv or Tuesday on the einht lioiir lavvv The belief seemed to he gen eral amoiiK the federation delegates to day that the convention ould take ac tion to co-operate 'with the brotherhoods in insisting on enforcement of the law. While President Gompcrs would not commit himself as advocating a strike by the railroad men if the law is not made effective, he asked the newspaper men vvhv there should not be a strike if the law is not enforced. Vice Presidents Duncan and O'Con nell expressed themselves in favor of the railroad men waiting a reasonable length of time, in the event of an in- FAYWAY BUTTER STORE H. F. HOLTHAUS, Prop. Butter, Buttermilk, Cot...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 18 November 1916

8 THE LABOR ADVOCATE Governor-Elect James M. Cox Vill Protect the Workingmen's Compensation Act and Amend It As Requested By the Ohio State Federation of Labor. He Will Advocate Reforms In Tax Laws and a Measure to Stop Intimidation of Voters. Washington. Governor-elect James M. Cox, while here this week, outlined the salient features of a legislative pro jjraiii which he hopes to have the next session of the Ohio Assembly enact into law. , With the Legislature safely in the hands of the Democrats, the Governor elect indicated complete confidence in the success of this program. While laws dealing with "taxation are frequently po litical dnainitc, Cox expressed clearly his belief that a reform in these statutes is imperative, and that the Legislature, in what he hopes will be a short, busy session, should put its hand to this task promptly. "One of the big problems the Legisla ture must face is relief for municipali ties," said Cox. "With the limitations of the Smith 1 per cent law o...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 18 November 1916

THE LABOR ADVOCATE Union Formed To Study Problems Before Manufacturing Men. Twelve Large Associations Included. "Co-operative Action Needed," Says Leader. New York. Formation of the Na tional Industrial Conference Hoard, with IB of the most important industrial or ganizations of the country in Us mem bership, as a "clearing house of informa tion" in the proposed study of problems confronting manufacturers of the United States, was announced here today at a meeting of the National Founders' As sociation, an organization of iron manu facturers. Frederick P. Fish, banker, of Hoston, is chairman, and Magnus W. Alexander, of West Lvnn, Mass., is manager of the new organization. William II. Harr, of Buffalo, Presi dent of the National Founders' Asso ciation, commenting on the necessity for the conference board, summed up its significance as follows : "The developments of the last year, J. J. ENNEKING Successor to Max Rudolph j& FLORIST j& Phone, Canal 273 11 W. 12th Street CINCINN...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 18 November 1916

10 THE LABOR ADVOCATE Building Contracts, Contractors ana Sub - Contractors Residence A liriek Inim-alow. to lie built on Jliclilc avenue, Clifton Hciuhts, ! Newport, Ky. Owner, A. C. Sickmcier; architect, L. U. Wilson, 10 W. Fourth street, Newport, Ky. Contracts awarded as follows : Carpenter work, C. C. Sharp; iron work, Henry Hucchcr; plastering, Gus Saner; lutiiliin, Jas. Diskcn; brick work, L. C. Sickmcier; painting, O. IS. Minn. Studio A 1-story stucco and sliinnle studio, to be built at LMO Southern ave nue, Mt. Auburn. Owner, Thos. W. Allen; architect. Chas. H. Strong, St. j I'riltl Itllj1,,,,r t at............ ft .. .......I in uuiiiiui, VIIIIIIIIIUW, Jt U-UIIII UUl for concrete foundation awarded to the DtiKan Concrete Co. Factory A 1 -story iron-clad shed, SOx.'ia feet, to be built in rear of factory at Spring Grove avenue and Sassafras street. Owner, the Triumph Mf Co,; architect, Martin Fisher, Slfld Central avenue, Cincinnati, O. Architect will re ceive lump bid until ...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 18 November 1916

X THE LABOR ADVOCATE II "COPPERS" SERVE AS MACHINISTS Dec-lutes Attorney Win. Thoiml.v kc, Who Kilos Suit Against Snlety Dlreetiir Ki-iollun1cr. Attornc William Thorndyke, suing as a taxpajcr in Cominon Picas Court, is seeking to enjoin Safely Director Friedlandcr fiom further assigning pa trolmen as machinists to repair police automobiles. August .Ml last Attorney Thoindyke wrote to City Solicitoi Cbailcs A Gioom requesting bun to bring suit, de claring that to assign patiobnen to do such woik and not to act as city police is a diversion of the public funds Attorney Tliorndjke stated that his attention had been called to the matter bj the Governing Hoard m this eitj of the Machinists' Union He also was 111 fonned, be said, the w.itei vvoiks rcp.ui shop on Hunt Street is being used as a repan shop foi city automobiles and that a lathe theie is m opeiation So licitor Groom declined to file the suit and Attorney Tliorndjke decided to bring action lu his petition Attorney Thorndvkc dec...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 18 November 1916

"J-" -"' myic 12 THE LABOR ADVOCATE 1 (.NMMUTV1 1 8-HOUR PROTEST INTERESTING TO CINCINNATI MEN Quri-n Citv I'oNtnl Clerks Hi quired to Work Overtime Coiiipiilnt tn Wilson Several Cities Tnke Av tion to lletter Working CiiiiiII tious. Cincinnati postofficc clerks wlio have been forced to work more than eight hours a day despite the eight-hour postal law were interested Monday in a dis patch from New York stating- that Thomas R Flaherty, secretary of the National Federation of Postofiicc Clerks, has filed a protest with President Wilson The letter calls the attention to the law which provides that clerks shall not be required to work more than eight hours a day and for working in excess of this are to he paid overtime in propor tion to their salaries. "This law contemplated that onI in emergencies should more than eight hours he required," the letter states, "yet in most of the large postoffices the clerks are forced daily and nightly to work ten, eleven and even twelve hours." The cl...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
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