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Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1904

The Management of Heifers. No matter how well a heifer is backed up by the milking qualities of ancestors, much of heT success as a dairy cow depends on getting her rightly started. Accordingly, though kept in a thrifty condition, she should not be encouraged to fatten while growing, lest when growth be attained all her surplus food goes to make fat. It is advisable to have her freshen as soon as she is two years old, if not a little before, and, generally speaking, the calf removed the moment it is born —if possible, so she will not see it, least of all touch it. Given, then, two quarts of sweetened and salt ed oatmeal, or linseed gruel, including drinking water with the chill taken off, she should four hours later be milked and the calf fed. That the milking may be nothing new to her, her udder and teats should have been previously handled, and even some milk drawn every night and morning if the udder happens to be too full for a few days before the calf is dropped. During this cr...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1904

14 Washington Live Stock Association CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS The first regular meeting of the Washington Live Stock Association was held at Walla Walla Feb. 6th and constitution and bylaws adopted. The matter of' selecting an official organ, with the view of thus communi cating any information to the members of the association regularly and eco nomically, was referred to the execu tive committee. Also the matter of collecting and publishing the brands and marks of the members was referr ed to the executive committee. It is expected that this organization will include practically every person engaged in growing or feeding cattle, sheep or other live stock in Washing ton and the Panhandle of Idaho and that part of Oregon tributary to Walla Walla. Many things for the benefit of mem bers are under consideration by the executive committee, which will be du ly announced in detail. All stock men are invited to become members by sending to Grant Copeland, secretary, Walla Walla, the sum of...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1904

Livestock Industry The Steer. The grown steer with a framework of bone overlaid with muscles and en cased in hide requires a certain quan tity of nutriment for mere existence. To supply this much alone only en ables it to continue life but does not appease the appetite which craves still more food. If provender beyond main tenance requirements is supplied the steer converts some of the surplus into fat and stores it away among the muscular tissues of the body, in the bones as marrow, under the hide and about the viscera, says "Field and Farm." This fat is fuel in the animal economy for which nature shows an eagerness by manufacturing and lay ing up a certain amount against the time of need. When first put on full feed, the steer gains rapidly in fat, gratifying the feeder as the increase is reported by the scales. After a few months, however, the appetite loses its keen edge, and the steer shows a daintiness not exhibited at first when taking food. If placed on the scales from time ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1904

16 Which Do You Want ? There are practically but two kinds of Cream Separators, the OLD PATTERN BUCKET BOWL vUI TYPE, the bowl of which is fitted with different kinds of inside contraptions, varying according l^-i to the hobby of the manufacturer, all of which take from 10 to 15 minutes to thoroughly cleanse, ijJFyi and on account of the weight of the bowl are hard running (some run harder than others). They A 3Wflk are all fitted with the head-high supply can, so inconvenient to pour into, and also with lubricators iwßri (Ilk and oil holes that choke up occasionally and need watching all the time. Some of them are LJjK Mil cheaply made and are imperfect skimmers. IS THAT THE KIND OF A MACHINE YOU WANT, *^ffsl Ift or do you not rather want a .JvjlLjil TUBULAR BOWL SEPARATOR l|Hgjpß&S| |J which has no inside bowl fittings, and can be swabbed out clean in a couple of minutes, and "* 'IP"* UP**i^^^ which, on account of the tube shape of the bowl offering a minimum resistance, can b...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 March 1904

THE RANCH :^^^M^B^^M&So^':'-'/:' VOL. XXI. NO. 5. TRAVELER'S VIEWS AND INTERVIEWS I talked with W. Eeilly, of Van Wyck, the other day. Mr. Keilly is a man of broad views and liberal educa tion, and it is not a little surprising perhaps to find such a man as he struggling, bachelor fashion, with the problem of clearing a stump farm in Whatcom county. Shingle bolts are the principal crop raised in this portion of Whatcom coun ty, I' says Mr. Eeilly. "The country, agriculturally considered, is not yet self supporting. True, it has been settled many years, but you Snow so long as men can find steady employment in the woods and mills they invariably work for wages, instead of devoting their time to clearing the land. Hence you see that most of the ranches have but a few acres cleared, and farming here abouts has scarcely yet been tested. I have lived here six years. I have tried clover raising—both Alsac and red clover —but have not yet demonstrated that it is a success here. I have ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 March 1904

2 • We Do Not Buy Anything, Consequently Have No Goods of JlF^ Our Own to Sell in Competition with Those Sent Us for Sale M^^L Both Phones 59 WALTER BOWEN & CO. WHOLESALE COMMISSION MERCHANTS Li ,J. HI I ,-■!,■ «■■ —rm ß ..n M i.w,oi.i M -»-.i' W »^» I ■ I IIBWWWBBMMBMMH—■—HHHWT-W.WUtffV.Ln, n mii,.M * i". -;. ■--'■■■.■'' _ -. ■ ■ -■■ '-- . ' ' "■'"■■-"■,■■■'■ ■ ■ ".. : ■ -.-•-■ ..'-:■•'. r -:-■■ -;--•_■' .■■..-."-..■. .i -.''-..-■--..•■■■-* ;.... •■ ■ . . \ r-+ : ■* \ r <•*.**-'*, -'. ■■ ' • ■ ■"■ " " j -:■-.:., * ■ ■:■*■•;■- - ' . ■, ■ ■ . ■ •■- • . :: :}■ ' --\ Aj 1 L^^ Mm §w I KJJBfrt I 111 *T WALTER BOWEN, : I Proprietor and Manager. Pi'oprietor and Manager. " Dealer* m : PRODUCE, GREEN AND DRIED fRUTS, NITS, VEGETABLES. ETC. 906 Western Avenue GOODS HANDLED STRICTLY ON COMMISSION CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED ; F U/A^H RETURNS MADE PROMPTLY OL/\ I ILL? TV/\on« PULL EITHER WIRE THE RANCH/

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 March 1904

THE RANCH With which Is consolidated Thf Washington Farmer, The Pacific Coast Dairyman, The Farmer and Dairyman, The Farmer and Turfman. Issued Ist and 15th of each month. PHIL. L. AXLINO, Editor Associate Editors: F. Walden. H. L. Blanchard. MILLER FREEMAN - - Publisher Seattle, Wash. Editorial Offices: Tel. Main 1265—Long Distance Connection. BUSINESS OFFICES: Seattle, - - Third Floor Downs Building. Spokane, Alexander & Co., 521 First Aye. Subscription (in advance), one year, 50 cts.; six months, 30 cts. If on time, sub scription will be one dollar. Seattle sub scribers are required to pay $1 per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted in every town to solicit subscriptions. Good commission and sala ries paid. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be notified in writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot find it o...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 March 1904

4 Horticultural Notes By F. WALDEN. , At the Farmers' Institute recently held in Walla Walla the veteran fruit grower, Dr. N. G. Blalock, was one of the speakers. He told of his struggles in raising fruit and wheat in the Walla Walla valley in the early days of that country. All that he said was good, but he closed his address by making an appeal to the farmers to keep their sons on the farm. He said in substance that many boys left the farm and went to the city because they wanted amuse ment. There they soon drifted away from steady habits and spent their evenings in one continuous round of amusement. Pretty soon they realized that they were falling behind finan cially and their work, if they had any, was being neglected. They became dis couraged and resorted to gambling to replenish their failing income. They became reckless and soon '' drifted to the devil." The doctor feelingly warned parents to keep their sons out of the city unless they had steady em ployment and could have su...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 March 1904

mended the experiment stations have put their emphatic '' no.'' For in stance, this writer suggests that if the horny-handed sons of toil will raise a few square rods of ginseng they can roll in wealth and wear diamonds. But did you read what Prof. Balmer said about the ginseng craze in The Ranch not long since! As throwing further light on this particular "tom my rot,'' I quote from an exchange the following: "Freewater, Ore., Jan. 25, 1904 —Noting a request from a sub scriber how to cultivate ginseng, I will say that if he will send to W. Atlee Burpee, Philadelphia, and get his cata logue and read his article on page 33, it will be as far as he will want to go in the business. I also have a letter from the botanist of the Department of Ag riculture, Washington, D. C, cooling my temperature down to normal -on the ginseng craze. — G. A. H." Before any one jumps into some of the things rec ommended by this writer he would do well to write his experiment station. It may be said of his...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 March 1904

6 THE DAIRY Dairy Industry in Siberia. Professor Zithrow writes of Russian Agriculture to the Breeders Gazette and says of the development of the dairy industry: '' The government, being anxious to settle up the country, and realizing that agricultural pursuits in this va,st domain are impossible without the aid of modern farm implements, has estab lished machine warehouses all over the agricultural districts of Siberia, from which the peasants are being supplied with American harvesting machinery, German plows and English threshing machines. In 1898 the experiment sta tion at Korgan discovered that the milk from the Siberian cow was unus ually rich in butter fat, the average of several tests being over b" per cent. The government established several experi mental dairies, which at once met with singular success. The Danish butter had obtained a splendid reputation on the London market, and the Danes were unable to supply the demand. Some of the butter merchants of Copen hagen hit u...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 March 1904

The factory ia now under construction, and a complete up-to-date creamery plant has been ordered of A. M. Ferrell, of Everett, the Northern Washington agent for the United States cream sep arator. The company expects to have the creamery in operation by the first of April, and it is safe to predict they will have a successful season. Their territory is one of the finest dairy sections in the state, and Jules Fred lund, the manager, took a course in the Wisconsin dairy school some years ago. He operated a very successful creamery at Übet, Wis., but last year returned to his old home at Mount Ver non. Chehalis Condenser Enlarged. For some time the proprietors of the Chehalis milk condensing plant have been considering a proposition to en large the factory to meet the growing demand for their product. The enlarge ment has finally been ordered, and L. A. Heinzorling, the company's carpenter, has a gang of men at work building an extension on the north end of the build ing 60x60 feet in ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 March 1904

s School of Experience This department is by and for the sub scribers of The Ranch. Contributions of not over 300 wards are asked of all who have anything valuable and of practical utility to relate. No definite subject is named, but it is desired that what is written for this de partment be pertinent to farming conditions in the Northwest. All are at liberty to write and no restriction is placed on the number of articles you send in. For each accepted article credit will be given on our books for 30 cents, to be taken out in either subscription or advertising. Write on one side of the paper only, and .always give your full name and address, though not neces sarily for publication if not desired by the correspondent. Raising Calves by Hand.— ln raising calves by hand 1 try to have them drinking skimmed milk at two weeks old, with the addition of a teaspoonful of oil cake meal, gradually increasing to a heaping tablespoon at three months. In preparing the food I put about one-half pi...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 March 1904

he makes it appear the industry is in a remarkably flourishing condition in the valley; the growers are shipping the stuff out in large loads and getting rich. In the issue of November 17 Shomaker has an extended hot-air article on ■' Ex periments in Regrassing." He lauds Russian brome grass to the skies. He says this grass is most extensively planted in the Yakima valley, and that it is "the gold mine of western agri culture." In the issue of December 15 there is Shomaker's article on the Yak ima valley sorghum crop. From read ing it one would think there was nc greater money maker in that section than sorghum crops, notwithstanding he makes the claim that celery, Rus sian brome grass and a multitude of other crops are the greatest money makers there. According to his fig ures one ton of sorghum yields 20 gal lons of fine molasses, the seed averages 40 bushels an acre and soils for $3 per ton, and the cane sells for $2 per ton. The figures are neatly manipulated and "He that loves ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 March 1904

10 Poultry Interests DV H. L. DLANCHARD. The following queries have been ad dressed to me: "Have you had any experience with Buff Cochins? In what respect do they excel such breeds as Brown Leghorns, Plymouth Rocks and llomlans, if there is any superiority in them? Are they good setters.' In egg laying qualities how do they compare with the Brown Leg horns?" In years past we have had some ex perience with the Buff Cochins. It was when we kept pens for fun and to look upon. These are beautiful fowls and have many admirers, but along side of the many other breeds they have no place on the farm, since they do not possess any superior qualities for either market purposes or egg pro duction. They are good setters and in that lies their greatest recommenda- tion, their disposition being in oppos ing contrast to those of the Brown Leghorn, as well as that of all the breeds that have distinguished them selves as being prolific layers. We feel safe in the statement that three times the profi...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 March 1904

an explanation will not account for the result. It is a well-known fact that the high-priced birds are all snap ped up by the exclusive trade, and it is suspected that a lot of stray fancy birds from elsewhere are sold as Rhode Islands or Vermonters. If it takes the same time to grow a cheap as it does a prime turkey, the poultry farmer is remiss in not suffi ciently studying his business so as to utilize his time and effort to produce better meat. Three hundred 15-lb. tur keys at 15c. per lb., wholesale, are worth $675. The same number of Ver monters of the same size, but at 30c. per lb., fetch $1,350. The difference in care and feed in a general poultry plant cannot exceed the cost of the cheaper stock by more than 25 per cent, or about $170, leaving a net gain of $505 on the sentimental price. The great complaint of the poultry market is against the immense amount of trashy poultry—thin, tough, stringy stuff —thrown upon the market. No one wishes it. There is always a good demand...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 March 1904

12 SPRAYING WASHINGTON Revised Wash. Station, by the ' TO deciduous or • . Nearly Kerosene emulsion part Peach borer.. or vv ' ) wash is two these the • • by , Codling Apple, or are lime in (ings ) All Paris in i 5 June to (May } to 10 are Apple, mainly to water, 5 foliage Beet, As soon Kerosene Pear, . cottony fall Dig and out . Peach, foot. height tree of ing Slug Paris appear. in the will fruit All trees adding ( spray. appear emulsion Cherry Plum, insects be the , Just the for usually Kerosene insects Turnip, Repeat, . ( For the root form, when present, remove the soil and treat with hot Turnip, necessary. Repeat, Kerosene kerosene A ■ hot and root present, form, Woolly base to of j j Finely-ground tobacco kerosene water Annie ('_ tree. Apple appear to also j f Leafcurl Peach buds , Leaf buds open. . . . . Before or the ? J first before or the after Potassium Prune 10 Repeat sulphide, Gooseberry $ Potassium intervals sulphide, Gooseberry burst is gals, picked. fruit ( '. fall. A...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 March 1904

Favorite Commission Firm Returns. Old readers of The Eanch will re member the commission firm of J. M. Hixson & Co., and that, shortly after the death of Mr. Hixson, the business was purchased by Mr. Walter Bowen. The old firm name was retained for a long time. This was the oldest com mission firm in Seattle; nothing but a commission business was carried on in all classes of farm produce and fruits. By reason of its fair treatment of cus tomers this house had a reputation of retaining its customers from year to year. It was with no little disappoint ment, therefore, that its customers saw the firm sell out its old location some months ago and go temporarily out of business. Mr. Bowen, in closing the deal, made an agreement not to go into business in Seattle again before Jan uary 1, 1904. It will be seen by refer ence to the big advertisement on the second page that Mr. Bowen is again in the commission business and is ready to hear from his old customers. He states he will conduc...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 March 1904

14, Livestock Industry Combination Sales of Fine Cattle. In another part of this paper an nouncement is made of the forthcoming sales of two hundred (Shorthorn and Hereford cattle at Spokane, Walla Walla and Pcndelton, Ore. The Spok ane sale occurs on March 8, and those who contribute the animals for this event are W. O. Miuor, lleppner; How ell W. Peel, Spokane; J. L. Smith, Spokane; B. T. Byrns, Moscow, Ida.; J. P. Graves, Spokane, and A. J. Splawn, North Yakima. The Walla Walla sale occurs on March 10, and will have ani mals from the herds of W. S. Goodman, Freewater, Ore., and E. J. Conrad & Son, La Grande, Ore. At Pendleton, Ore., on March 12 there will be sold 105 head consigned by C. B. Wade, N. C. Maris and W. T. Eigby. These three sales will afford an opportunity to se cure some choice animals by those who are anxious to have good strains of blood for building the foundation of great herds. The animals in these sales are all good ones and the men who con sign them are c...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 March 1904

the pigs produced by these scientific breders selling at fancy prices—they are essential to the well-being of the breed. The professional breeders are breeding up and the general pork pro ducers arc breeding down. The pro fessional breeders are feeding their hogs and pigs on a well balanced ration and are putting stamina and force and bone into their products. The general farmers are feeding largely of corn from the time their pigs are weaned till butchering time and are unfitting them for breeders. Thus the profession als are doing a work that we would be in a sorry plight without. Suppose there were no breeders that were pro ducing high quality boars and sows to go out as herd-improvers, what would happen? In twenty-five years we would have a condition in which irregular lit ters would be frequent, that is, litters in which only part of the pigs were good-sized, or would ever grow to good size. We hear even now of herds in which there are now and then chubby little pigs that can n...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 March 1904

16 DO YOU LIKE DRUDGERY? afff^ff If you dothen you will buy one of the "other kind" of Cream Separators; one with a "bucket" *Y&S bowl, filled with little plates or with wings, or with layers of corrugated cones, fitting inside one Y^\ another and punched full of holes. For experiment, smear your nutmeg grater with the white ijr»j of an egg, then go ahead and cleanse it. Remember the holes have to be cleaned thoroughly; / iS^&flk^ this is wnere ** becomes interesting. Do the same with 30 or 40 little pie plates. Don't shirk Qra™jFKßk any of them; remember there is a sticky coating on them, albumen. You will enjoy washing all ■Hr IB these twice a day, and then the bowl itself. The above will give you an idea of the contract you MniEffia fa li will assume if you buy one of the "other kind," perhaps just because your neighbors bought I^HH I llil them 6or 8 years ago. <JayyS|ta the tubular bowl is only a tube 1 1 »^3||^^J BE From 2 to 2]/ inches in diameter. A piece of cheese...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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