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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

THE FINAL CAUCUS It was only 18 months ago, and it was the kind of day the late Allen Spangler once described as "made by God in Heaven and dropped below to impress mankind with His skill." the temperature was just right, the humidity just right, the sky a canopy of blue,. and breezes enough to soothe an army. Singing birds were everywhere in brother Coy's back yard. Three men with more in common than just their ages were assembled to greet and celebrate the day. Their total age almost equaled two and one half centuries and all of them were severely handicapped. Brother Coy was bent almost double from the residual effects of gouty arthritis, Pete Keiger was limited to outdoors mobility in a golf cart, having lost both feet to surgery for a circulation problem; and James Bailey, who sat in the cart with Pete was a victim of angina and developing blindness. Within the past seven months, all three of the genial and very witty men have bravely faced, and been defeated by death. But not ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

PAGE 10 MOUNTAIN LAURBL APRIL,»I9BS Thomas P. Deemer's size suited him just fine; anyone around Clarksburg could tell you that all the Deemers were little fellas. Being small came right with the package that included wiriness and speed, an ability to tinker and fix anything, and above all, a kind of good natured fiestiness. He was the foreman's logical choice to fill the job of shot fireman in the mine when making a living was what he had to do. A shot fireman had to be small enough to squeeze into the front of the first car in the new mine, spunky enough to handle the dynamite, and have brain enough to understand the apparatus and the geologicals, so as to place the fearful stuff correctly. Oh, he had heard the train whistles blow and hankered, for a fleeting time, to leave the hills and Clarksburg, but that was long before Carlie Manning and he pledge to each other. That solemn promise, murmered on Easter morning in front of a churchful of Mannings and Deemers, turned Tom inward, ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

MOUNTAIN BOY Continued from page 10. rain. Squeezing his eyes shut against the panic he could feel coming from Laing and rising in his body took every ounce of will Tom possessed. Soldiers' tales and rumors of capture and torture at the hands of Nazis momentarily flashed through his mind, but he forced a kind of steely, anxious control on himself. He knew he had to think. He had to think of a way out. Laing was becoming incoherent as they marched. "They mean to kill us, oh, Mother, Mother, I'm sorry, will they kill us? Oh, Mother..." "Shh, no Laing, listen, listen to me." Tom hissed, "We got a chance, he's gonna light a smoke'.' Tom saw in a frantic backward glance, that the German had pulled a cigarette from underneath his poncho, and was about to light it. At that moment his fear lessened. It was a solution. It seemed neither desperate nor reckless. It was what to do. "He's gonna have to duck under that slicker to get it lit." he whispered to Laing. "That's our OPENSOON! DODDCREEK...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

PAGE 12 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1985 OUT AND ABOUT IN THE MOUNTAINS Question: What are the differences between rabbits and hares? Answer: Rabbits and Hares belong to the same family. There are more similarities than there are differences. The differences though, will help you distinguish between them. Hares are usually larger than rabbits, have longer, more powerful hindlegs; and longer ears. Hares generally prefer a more open habitat than rabbits. Hares, because of their powerful hindlegs and environment, will try to outrun their predators. Rabbits aren't such good runners, they live in denser cover. They will try to hide from their enemies rather than outrun them. Hares make no nests for their young, because the young are born so well developed that they can take care of themselves within a few hours after birth. Their eyes are open and they are furred out. Rabbits, like our native cottontails, do make nests. Their young are born naked with closed eyes. They need care from their mo...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

Genealogy (More GENEALOGY on page 15.) I am looking for any descendants of California (Callie) Adams, 1850-1944 or Tennessee (Tex) Adams, her sister. Callie married James St.Clair. Both the St.Clair and Adams families lived in Body Camp in Bedford Co. Va from (?) -1940. V.B. English 1687 Third Ave. New York, NY 10028 My father, Lloyd Milton Hundley is from Carroll Co., VA. His father was Arthur Hundley, married Bessie Vass. I really don't know much more about the Hundley side than that. They died when I was two. My great-grandmother on the other side of my family was from Critz, Patrick Co., VA. Her name was Mattie Kendrick Martin. Any information anyone could give me on either side would be appreciated. Thank you Mrs. Tammie Fulcher Rt. 4, Box 303 Martinsville, VA 24112 I will pay for proof of parents (and birth place) of Jubal Willis who married Violet Jones Oct. 1820. Violet, daughter of Thomas Jones. Jubal died 1851 - cemetery dates, Pigg River Church Callaway, Va. Franklin Co. ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

PAGE 14 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1985 The Mail Box Dear Madam, Please send a year's subscription to a friend in Boonsboro, Maryland. The card should be, "Thinking of You." Thank you for so much enjoyment. The first story in the February issue about the pig was great. I had a real laugh. Please start my friend's subscription with the Febuary issue. Sincerely, C.W. Snyder West End, North Carolina Dear Mountain Laurel, Enclosing my check for a one year subscription to your wonderful paper. Hope you don't try to improve this paper. It don't need it. We like it as is. Mrs. R. Funk White Marsh, Maryland Hi! Here is our $6.00 for another wonderful year of the "Laurel". I can't explain the way I feel each time I read cover to cover, an issue. I feel a strange pull to come to your area even though my "roots" are in Mingo County, West Va. I am coming down soon. Regards, N. Flood Dillwyn, VA Dear Susan, Robert, Charlotte, and Lane, After reading your November issue, I drafted a letter to you on ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

Genealogy I am interested in the Salmons family of Patrick Co. and I hope there is someone with a lot of data. My great-great-great grandfather was Johnathan Salmons, great-great grandfather was Jesse Salmons. A great- great- great- greatgrandfather was Elder Jesse Jones an early Patrick Co. Primitive Baptist minister. He was born in 1766 and died 1859. He and his wife are buried in the Elder Jesse Jones/Salmons/Thompson Cemetery south of Rd. 719 in Patrick Co. as listed in Mr. O.E. Pilson's book, "Toombstone Inscriptions of the Cemeteries of Patrick County, Virginia". I am hoping someone will be able to tell me by whom and when the beautiful headstone for Rev. Jesse Jones was erected. The headstone contains this verse: Remember man as you pass by As you are so once was I Subscribe Today To The Mountain Laurel A Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life 1 Year (12 Issues) Only *B.OO Send A Gift! or 2 Y ear (24 Issues) Only *14.00 Tell us the occasion (Happy Birthday, Anniversary, Get Well So...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

PAGE 16 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1985 MAMA (EFFIE PETERS EDWARDS) REMEMBERS ilk \» ]'* !mL %m ■EBBg" < >. *js3Bhbbbl- . iku. JIB ■■■■■■■P IIIRIRa^M Walter Edwards and Effie Peters. This photograph was taken in 1916, before they were married. Walter was home on leave from the army before going overseas. Mama seldom talks about the past. She is a "here-and-now" kind of person and lives each day as it comes. She says, "God let me live to see so many changes, the least I can do is adjust to them and live in the world as it is today". Perhaps this attitude accounts for her longevity and ability to cope with today's problems. On one of those rare occasions when Mama was feeling nostalgic (I had just read her The Mountain Laurel), she took me with her on a nostalgic trip back through her past. Effie Peters Edwards was born January 16, 1899, near Endicott, Virginia. She was the only daughter of George and Mary Elizabeth Hash Peters. She had three brothers and says, "When...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

MAMA REMEMBERS Continued from page 16. Since neither one of them had any money, they decided to put yokes on their cows so they couldn't get under the fence and went on being good friends. We never had any cash. We used things that we had to trade for what we needed. We didn't buy much. Everything was made out of iron and lasted forever and there was no machinery to break down. The biggest thing we had was a chestnut orchard before the blight killed them. We would get up and pick up chestnuts before breakfast and take them to Tanny Cannady's Store to buy shoes and school supplies. I used to sit before the fire for hours with a shoe last in my lap and crack walnuts on it with a flat iron. Ma used walnut stain to dye flour sacks for clothing and quilts. We wasted nothing. We used every inch of a hog. We made soap and candles out of the tallow. We used the gristly parts like the ears and tail to make souse meat and ground the scraps for sausage and stuffed it in corn shucks to keep. Wh...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

«- V 4 >1 i frlAtY)')'l <"i>' , .IH -i A PAGE 18 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1985 MAMA REMEMBERS Continued from page 17. family, I insisted on coming home." " Mama had some definite ideas and they usually worked out for her. She wanted two children - "I saw too many people have more than they could take care of. I wanted girls because I never had a sister." She had two daughters and now three grand daughters, one grandson, four great granddaughters and one great grandson. She is no longer outnumbered by boys. After returning to Franklin County, my parents became tennant farmers and Mama remembers, "tying my children to a tree so I could watch them while I worked in the fields. Finally, Walter got his "soldier's bonus" and we bought our own place." But Mama wasn't too happy with the location. It was in a remote hollow on Beards Creek and she thought it was lonely. Her ma got sick and came to live with her and she took care of her until she died in 1936. It...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

HER KIND OF PEOPLE © COPYRIGHT 1985 Over narrow, wire-rimmed spectacles she peered at me, a stranger in these particular hills, as I ambled up the stone lined path to the aged farmhouse . Fractured porch steps revealed a crude but makedo doghouse, complete with speckled beagle, who made threatening gestures with his teeth, but other wise lay motionless. A proud bantam rooster cocked his crimson comb in my direction from a corner of the rusted tincovered dwelling, and a calico cat, curled up on the top step, completely ignored my approach. "Wonder what HE wants?" the woman was probably muttering under her breath. "I must look a sight!" She plucked a well-chewed twig from her pooched lips and dabbed at the hinges of her mouth with a bordered apron, visibly snuff-stained, but obviously handy. "Evening, ma'am", I said, with an especially cordial drawl. "Know where I might find some old chestnut rails?" Picking up a brown-splattered spit jar and clearing her jaws of a glob of exhausted t...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

PAGE 20 MOUNTAIN"LAUREL 1 APRIL, 1985 In the early 1970'5, progress was taking its toll on the small town of Jefferson, North Carolina by way of the demolition of the old Mountain Inn. In years gone by the Mountain Inn had been the only place in the area with its own electricity supply, and in the days before cars, travelers to Jefferson found rest and shelter at the old Inn. During the demolition of the old building, a box containing old glass photo negatives was found and in a stroke of luck, they came into the possession of Robert (Bob) M. Rice, who is a master photographer and owner of the Log Cabin Studio in Jefferson. Bob carried the slides to the photography laboratory of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, North Carolina where he took advantage of the state of the art equipment available to clean, harden and develop the turn of the century negatives. He managed to process and save around 80 of them. After showing the finished photographs to hundreds of people, an...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

The following is an excerpt from a journal kept by Elizabeth Cooley McClure of Carroll County, Virginia from 1842 (she was 17 then) until her death in Is4s. Her journal not only reflects the day to day world she and her family lived in, but a young girl's hopes and expectations for the future. A special thanks to the Cooley family for sharing it with us. Feb 15, [1846] It is cold again, snowy, terrible indeed! Oh I fear cold, cold and no feed hardly. . .hard times. I am busy body and mind and heaps to do and attend to. James [her brother] is gone to invite hands to my wedding. What a word! How long have I thought of it..l dread it. I would be glad if it was over. It is concluded upon that we have to go to Tiptons for an infare. Texas is the motto with me now. I expect to start by the last of March and must have a mind of my own and get along the best I can. Oft will I think of Carroll and its inhabitants with tears of fond remembrance, but may they not be those of bitter repentance....

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

PAGE 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1985 ALIEN IN THE SOUTH A year ago I became an "Alien in the South" by way of Oregon and New England. Now that might sound a little complicated and off route but a brief explanation can clarify everything. Because of health problems encountered by below zero weather, we were forced to move from a beautiful state to a different area. Our son thought he had fully sold us on the West, but having been there for a period of nine months was enough to discourage us on the idea of making it our permanent home. When the town we were in got over 200 inches of rain in a period of six months time, we felt it was high time to "duck" out of there. I was sick of "web feet" and "moss" growing between my toes. Others might have been able to have handled the state better. However, it was Eastward Ho for our family. Our son said it would be the biggest mistake of our life and that we would end up in swamp land and marshes and snakes. True, we have seen a few snakes in Ma...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

ALIEN IN THE SOUTH Continued from page 22. monia); the other reason stated was eating the greens purifies your blood. I'll bank on the second theory! the mention of Boneset was another eye arouser. I've been told that the best time to pick it is in the Fall of the year, dry it and then later steep it for tea. They say it too will cure pneumonia; it sweats it out of you. When you wake up in the morning the sheets will be fully soaked for convincing evidence. Last but not least was the fact that if you drink sassafras tea for a FULL MONTH you won't have to worry about ever being sick and if you are, then the doctor will make a free house call. Now that's some guarantee if you don't drown first. I figure about then it's high time to swap some New England tales so we can all stay afloat. I am always searching out a new lay of the land. My travels have taken me from McDowell County to Burke County and I've barely touched the surface. I took a hike with some friends of mine to Upper Creek...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

PAGE 24 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1985 "Caleb, you don't mean to tell me that you ain't sent in your taxes yet! It's April 14th. and they gotta be postmarked by tomorrow at the latest." Tax time always brought out the worst in Caleb. He always put it off til the very last minute and this year was no exception. This year he was especially cranky because of all the talk about taxing social security. "Hit just ain't right, Henry. I give my country everything a man ought to. You'd think by the time a man reached my age they'd let him alone. I fought in France in the Big War. I bought War Bonds. I've kept up my end of every patriotic duty, but a man has to draw the line somewhere. And last year was the straw that broke the camel's back, Henry," fumed Caleb. "Now I don't care what that fancy-dan tax man says, when a farmer loses a shoat, hit's a loss. Anybody ought to know that's one less pig that'll be a hog and a heap more'n a dollar less that'll be coming back from the market. Why, I put ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

PINE CREEK CHURCH CEMETERY Dear Mountain Laurel, I just want you to know that we all appreciate what you have done for Pine Creek Cemetery. We hope to go to church up there this Fourth of July. I think it's such an humble looking church, looks like the times when I was a child. And oh, how I hate to see a family cemetery grow up. We have one and I try to help my brothers keep it up. Brother and Sister Spangler have people there in Pine Creek Cemetery. I am sure he will not be able to come back up this 4th of July. He has an uncurable disease but still tries to come to church in a wheel chair and preaches from his chair. May God bless you in your good work. I take The Mountain Laurel and I love it dearly. I think my subscription is out in May, but keep it coming. I'll send you the money for it. Yours sincerely, Mrs. R.C. Smith Reidsville, North Carolina Dear Mountain Laurel, A friend of ours had a copy of The Mountain Laurel. We found it very interesting, especially the article about...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

PAGE 26 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1985 BACKROADS Continued from page 28. miles. We will begin and end at the intersection of Route 18 and the Blue Ridge Parkway, which is located between Parkway Mile Posts 217 and 218 in North Carolina, just south of the Virginia border. This area is ideal for picnicing and camping and if you don't bring a camera, you'll probably regret it. The underlined numbers at the beginning of each paragraph indicate the total distance we've traveled from our point of beginning to that point of interest on our tour. The numbers in parentheses () indicate the distance from the last point of interest that we passed. 00.0 Traveling south on the Blue Ridge Parkway, we will have just crossed the Virginia border into North Carolina and passed Parkway Mile Post marker 217, when we will turn onto the exit ramp leading to Route 18. 00.2 (.2) From this stop sign at the end of the exit ramp, we will turn right onto Route 18 west, towards Sparta, North Carolina . 02.4 (2.2) ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

BACKROADS Continued from page 26. National Forest Service and all trees, shrubs and flowers are not allowed to be removed or destroyed. I have only seen comparable forests in northern New England and must admit, it seems strange to find such an area in southwest Virginia. 61.9 (2.3) We are now at the top of Whitetop Mountain, elevation 5344 feet, the second highest peak in the state of Virginia. This is also the highest road accessable by car in the state. We will turn around at the weather and communications satellite station on the crest of the mountain and head back down the way we came. My notes for this area were simply the word, "VIEW" followed by about ten exclamation marks. It is spectacular. 62.2 (.3) As we head back down the mountain, we'll cross the Appalachian Trail at this point. 65.0 (2.8) We are now back to the stop sign where we turned off of state road 600 onto Forest Service Road #B9- We will turn left here, back onto state road 600. 66.3 (1.3) This area is known a...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

y HEART OF THE BLUE RIDGE V\ounUM , mindii""" A Copyright 1984 Laurel Publications Inc. A l9B5 L J&g&UF Monthly Journal of Mountain Life PAGE 28 A self-guided monthly tour of Mountain Backroads mountains never get to see the really pretty places that are hidden away on mountain back roads. As residents who love and appreciate a stream gurgling through a glade or a deer standing in a roadside meadow or an old weathered barn tucked away in a mountain hollow, our BACKROAD column allows us to share our favorite spots with you. Back in a simpler time, Teddy Roosevelt bear hunted each year in the area around Whitetop Mountain and Mount Rogers. The local folks went about the daily tasks of their lives and they, like the President, savored and enjoyed the beauty of this unique area with its unusual (for Virginia) northern forest. Little has changed since that time because tucked into this far western corner of Virginia is, without doubt, some of the most spectacular ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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