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Elephind.com contains 15,083 items from Preston Leader, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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THE MAKER OF SABOTS AN IDYLL OF THE FOREST. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 7 March 1914

THE MAKER OF SABOTS AN IDYLL OF T'rHl FORGEST. (13y M, P. Willcocks, in "Daily News and Leader.") Seen froml afar, this Breton beech wood is Just a blue mist on the horizon. But within it the stillness is so deep that no twig can fall or undergrowth rustle without being noted. With theose sounds comes the sense of an abiding presence, as of one who moves about his own house, In summer the ponds re Ilect the green world that surrounds them, and across tile long white roads, whlerc the branches almost meet over head, blows the woodland smell, damp and fresh with the breath of air and moss. "Lord of the Seven Forests" was an ancient title of the noblesse when almost all the Breton land was forest, the temple of strange worships, each spring therein a haunt of goat footed dwarfs, Now, through the tunnel of the trees, there shines this winter day the open sky and beyond it, more mist of wood land. A silver birch waves its few pale leaves in air. There is the scent of cleft wood from the ...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SUNSHINE AND SNOW SPORT IN THE ENGADINE. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 7 March 1914

SUNSHINE AND SNOW SPORT IN THIE ENGADINE, New Year's Day in the Swiss moon tain resorts is (says a special corres ipondent of "The Daily News and Load or," writing from Pontresina), one of glorious sunshine and intense frost. Better conditions for the skaters who have gathered hero from all the corners of Ntiurope have never been known; but the ski-ers are still looking for more sno\w, Yesterday there were a few: grey clouds that gave them hope, but the snow suddenly changed its fickle mind, and ahls morning the region of white above the Engadino Valley was defined In gold and blue by a,rosplen dent sunrise. t'hero is no wind, except that report ed by ski-ers in the hotel smoking room, who have laboriously climbed all day to the snowilolds to find it, and then soilled down to tea in minutes to tell us of "wind up there like sharp knilves," On the lower slopes the air is in complete repose-whith is fortunate, for the thermometer shows an astonish ing degreeoo of cold, which, however,...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE CAPTAIN EXPLAINS. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 7 March 1914

THE CAPTAIN EXPLAINS. An old sea captain, who wooed and won his wife in a very brief courtship, is wont to describe, with deep-chested chuok)es, the plight from which he rescued her at their first meeting. it was in the early (lays of the crinoline, and the girl, dressed in her best, had come dlown the wharf to meet her father, also a captain, whose vessel had been aighted.at the mouth of the harbor, T'he wind was strong, and she soon found herself in difficulties. "First I ever saw o' my wife," says the captain, "she was a gal-a fine, able, sauoy-looking craft, sall set an' scudding before the wind straight for the end o' Timmin's Wharf, sending up dlitress signals as she went, Her can vas was more'n she could stand up un der, an' she knew it; but she couldn't take in sail, an' every sheet and stay held, an' 'there she druv-stralght for the end o' the wharf an' fifteen feet o' 'water. She was 'la distress, an' I tell you she let folks know itl You'd oughter heard her, Fog-horns an'...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ANTICIPATED THE EFFECT. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 7 March 1914

ANTICIPATED THE EFFECT. A good story Is told at the expense of an under.graduate at a certain uni. veorsity. He was attending the chonl.i cal lectures of a distinguilhed, if not popular, professor, who had announced for his next lecture some experiments with laughing gas, The student, who knew that persons under the influence of laughing-gas were not responsible for their words or actions, saw an op. portunity of telling the professor some home-truths with impunity. On the afternoon of the lecture the professor called for a volunteer for the oxperiments to be made, and our undergraduate promptly came -to lls assistance, to the nmusement of the class, whichbad 'been taken into his confidence, The bag containing the hilarious gas was duly affixed to the student's mouth, and he commenced to inhale vigorously. The effect was magical, The student began to abuse the pro. fessor in terms which are unknown In polite circles. The professor lent a patient ear to thig testimony to his characte...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHEN STORING APPLES. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 7 March 1914

WHEN STORING APPLES. Apples for keeping must not be bruised nor the skin broken, there fore certain precautions are necessary in the picking. A common mistake is to pull the stein off the fruit, which leaves a hole in the skin at that point and allows'the germs of decay to enter; another is to pluck the fruit in such a way that the stem bruises it; a twist and an upward movement should he given, which will generally detach the stem from the fruit spur ,without damaging either the tree or the fruit. Careless pickers sometimes break off the spurs, and so reduce next season's crop. The fruit should not be thrown but placed in the basket, and any that falls on the ground should be set aside for immediate use, There is no better way of storing apples than to spread them Ir single layers on a shelf in a dry shed, cel lar, or spare room.

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
YOUR SECOND POTATO CROP. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 7 March 1914

YOUR SECOND POTATO CROP, fet in your second crop of potatoes as quickly as possible. There may be some dfficulty in obtaining sulltwble seed, but if any can be obtained at all, lay it on a damp spot and keep it covered wlith some litter; It will soon sprout sufficient for planting. Do not cut the potatoes (or this crop. It Is better and safer to plant me. diunm-szed Lubors than large ones cut up, as if so treated they come up very irregular, the cause of which will be found that they have rotted in the ground, Giood farming Is not In the land, it Is not in the stock, It is not in the climate." It Is In the men and women who till the land, 'keep the home, feed the stock, and take advantage of the climate, Professional Beggar (in ilardupp's office): I've ben out o' work for over a year, nmlter, and ain't got the price of a night's lodgin', Can yer do any. thing to help me out? Hardupp (sardonically): I'd liketo, but I sprained my foot on a collector yesterday.

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A DAIRY FARMER DROPS INTO POETRY. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 7 March 1914

A DAIRY FARMER DROPS INTO POETRY. A dairy farmer embodies his faith, as well as his words, In the following expressive poem, which he has hung in his stable to be known and read by all who visit his tidy premises:- I haven't much faith In the mlan who complains Of the work he has chosen to do, Ile's lazy, or else he's deficient iIn brains, And, maybe, it hypocrite, too, Ile's likely to cheat, and he's likely to rob: Away with the man who finds fault with his job, llut give me the mall with the s4i inl Ills face And the shadows all dancing be. hind; Who can meet his reverses with calm. ness and grace, And never forget to be kind. For, whether lie's 'wielding a sceptre or swab, I have faith In the man who's in love with hIlls job.

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SELECTED RECIPES. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 7 March 1914

SELECTED RECIPES, ,lolasses (Cookles,--One cupful of butter, one large egg, one half cupful of sour milk, one heaping teaspoonful of soda, half a teaspoonful of ginger; flour to make a soft dough, so it carl be easily rolled, BIlake in a mnoder. ate oven,. ilolasses Cookies No. 2.-Two cupl fuls of molasses, one cupful of butter, one egg, two tablespoonfuls of sour milk, two large teaspoonfuls of soda, one teaspoonful of ginger, one half teaspoonful of oinnamon; flour enough to mix soft, Bake quickly, Do not roll too thin. One.half or two*thirds of a cupful of chopped nut meats add. ed to ordinary cooky dough makes a pleasant change, Caraway seed also makes a nico variation, Ginger Snaps,--One cupful pf light brow sungar, one cupful of molasses, three.fourths of a cupful of beef drip. pings. Boll together four or five mnl, utes, cool, then add one teaspoonful of soda, one teaspoonful of cinnamon, one-half teasploonful of ginger, aitd flour to make a moderately stiff dough, Iloll thin...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SELF-SACRIFICE A VICE. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 7 March 1914

SELF.SACRIFICE A VICE, flow far Is it right to carry the vir. tue of self-sacrlfice, Many ,women set no limits to It, and try to secure a monopoly of this particular virtue, heedless of other people's chances to practise It a little on their own ac count, We all know the mother who never allows her daughters to help In household matters because she wishes thenm to have a "good time," and up to a certain point she Is to be admired. It Is only right that young people should have a certain aimount of recreation and amusement; Ibut, un. less they are to develop grit and back. bone, to say nothing of an unselfish spirit, they must not have life made too easy for them, The world's great men and women have not come fronm the ,wealthy, leisured classes-far front it. They have sprung from those who knew how to "Loll terribly," who have had hard limes in their youth, and have thereby developed character. Mothers who sacrifice thenselves In order to give the girls and ,boys this good time are ...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION ACT. ESTIMATED TO RETURN £600,000. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 7 March 1914

WORKMEN'S CNMPENSATION ACT. ESTIMA'TED TO 1 , UI'LRN £600,000. W'itlh the incoming of the Work men's Compensation Act, now fully passed, and only waiting Deopartmoen tal arrangements before it is brought into force, the burden of the employer is considerably increased. In the course of i few weeks the Act will be in operation. Under its provisions the insurance of servalnts and workers is compulsory, and the Government, as well as ordinary assurance societies, will collect lireolmiums and issue poli cies to all emplloyers of labor. In this respect the Act passed by the \Vatt (Government is far more drastic than that introduced into Now South Walo, by the Labor Ministry thele. Altogether there is a hallppy tim ahenad for the inlsuralnce sociietles ald tOXis pirating eOxperienIces for employers of labor. The pnvmonts for prelmu n;N will vary with tile naturo of the c: cupatitons, thus: ANN UAL PREMIUMS PAID FORl EVE',iRY £100 PAIL) IN WAGIES (lhufl'cuttors, £2 10s, Bulclhers, .C1 s. J...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LIGHTNING CURES. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 7 March 1914

LIGHTNING CURES, There is an old saying to the effect that "faith will either kill or cure," and it would semr to apply to lightning also. Certainly it is a remedy which nobody could be persuaded to 'try vol. untarily, but there are many cases on record where 'permanent benefit has been derived from being struck by lightning-that is, subjected to Na ture's own electrical treatment. A telegraph employe in Germany who was manipulating his instruments during a severe thunderstorm was seen to fall at the very instant that a lightning flash of intense vividness oc curred. At first he was thought to have been killed instantly, 'but it was afterwards found that he was .still alive, although he was both senseless and paralysed. In this state he re malined about twenty-four hours, and then recovered completely, Strangely enough, prior to the lightning stroke lie was in very indifferent health, but since that apparent catastrophe his health had been more robust than ever before in his life, A...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
N.S.R.A. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 7 March 1914

N.S.R.A. The monthly meeting was held on Tuesday evening in All Saints' parish hall, Mr. R. F. Brown in the chair. Correspondence from the Clifton Hill Progress Association was read re the planting of trees on the banks of the Merri Creek, and stating they had com municated with the Collingwood council in regard to same. The East Ward Progress Association wrote stating that a meeting of delegates would be held at Mr. Creak's workshop on Saturday, 7th March, to consider the question of tram service for the eastern portion of the town. The secretary reported that ow ing to the hall being otherwise engaged the annual concert would take place on the 23rd April instead of 21st in All Saints' hall. Two new members were enrolled, Mr. Dutton was then called on to deliver his illustrated lecture on his trip to the Old Land. A large num ber of members and their wives gathered to hear the lecture, which was most in teresting. A vote of thanks was accor ded the lecturer on the motion of the may...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Condition of Breeding Sow. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 7 March 1914

Condition of Breeding Bow, Pigs to breed ,well should nol be too fat. - It is the aim of successful breeders of swine to Ieep their ani mals in a medium condition, neither too fat nor too thin. A sow that Is too fat will be less prolific and will make a poorer mother than a thin sow. The fat animal Is likely to roll on her pigs, and the' pigs from those sows are ,apt to 'be small and weakly. Do not breed sows until they are 10 or 12 months old, and then keep them in medium flesh, and they will do better than if too fat. Proper Mfood and special care and at tention are necessary to raise good pigs,

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Riding on Paths at Preston. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 7 March 1914

Riding on Paths at Preston. IH. R. Paddle wrote to the Preston council on Monday evening complaining of cyclists riding on the Cramer street footpaths. On Sunday, 15th, when three of his children were on their way to Sunday school, one of them was knocked down and sustained bruises and abresions. The rider, who gave no warning, said the child should have got out of his road, Cr. Howe said that this was a really dangerous practice, all too common in Preston, as he lihad lpersonally ex perienced. It sh1ould be stollpetl. 1 he moved that the atttn'lltion of the Ipolice he ('illtled. Cr, Pater·son, who scounidetlI the( mnotion, suggestedtl h Ithe magistrctates should sako the lines heavier, .''hti miotioin wvis carriedl, T'Ihe dlscovery of happiness may we!l be the grreat alli of wisdom; aUtl we needs must be happy our selhes before we can know that 'wls doui Itself contains all,

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHAT FRUIT TREES REQUIRE. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 7 March 1914

WHAT FRUIT TREES REQUIRE. The most essential elements for the production of fruit are nitrogen, potash, phosphoric acid and lime. Ni. trogen encourages leaf and wood growth, which are essential to the development of the tree and to the production of the best quality of fruit, Potash, an essential constituent in the growth of fruits, constitutes a large proportion of the ash of the wood and more than 50 per cent, of the ash of the fruit, and is also as* sociated with the development of fla. vor in the fruit. Phosphoric acid is essential to the development of the tree; lime is not in itself an essen. tial element, but assists in liberating plant food. On a soil deficient in lime, growth often continues so late that the wood does not mature nor the fruit ripen properly.

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Anonymous. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 7 March 1914

Anonymous, A well-known author, on leaving his house one morning, forgot a leto foter that he had intended to post. Dur. lng the afternoon something recalled it to his nlind, and ias it was of con siderable Importance he immediately hurried home, The letter was no. where to be found, and he summoned the maid. "Have you seen a letter lying about?" 'Yes, sir." "Where is it?" "Posted, sir." "Postedl Why, theo wasn't anly name or address on the envelope!" "I know there wasn't, asir: but I tnought it must eus In answer to one of them anonymous letters you've been getting latelyl" Months lEfore a young man makes up his mind to propose, the girl in the case has decided upon the fiat and its furnishinge. There is no reason why we should fear ghosts; this is one of the reasons why they so seldom appear. Each high achievement is .1 sign 4nd token of the whole nature's pos. s:bility. What a piece of the map was for that shining moment it is the duty of the whole man to be .:lways, A boy wouldn...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SMALL ORCHARDS [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 7 March 1914

SMALL ORCHARDS Fruilgrowing is becoming more and more of a science nowadays, and in tensive cultivation pis an indispensable adjunct to sclenttlfic treatment. With the great rambling orchards of old days there was little or no attempt made at real fruitgrowing on sound principles, alnd the consequence was that heavy losses were, in time, sus tained through tile ravages of dlis. ease and the invasion of insects. No orchardist who sets himself to meet the requirements of the market can afford to submit any but good qual ity stuff, and, unless he be be . mi lionaire-in which case he would be rearing his orchard for pleasure, not profit--he cannot provide the labor and skill necessary for the cultiva* Lion of large areas, wherefore, this is the day of small orchards.

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PRESTON SHIRE COUNCIL. MONDAY, 2ND MARCH. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 7 March 1914

PRESTON SHIRE COUNCIL. ---,--+----- MONDAY1 2ND MARCH. Present:-Crs, Braithwaite (presi dent), Warr, Stanlake, Crispe, Robert son, HIowe, Paterson, Allchin, and Bricknell. FUNEREAL INVITATION. The chairman and managers of the New Melbourne Cemetery wrote invit ing councillors to a visit of inspection on Thursday, 5th inst, Cr. Warr-Who wants a ride? (Laugh ter). Cr. Robertson moved that as many councillors as possib'o attend. It would he a good thing for councillors to see the progress made. He, for one, inten ded to go. The president (to Cr. Warr)-Do you second the motion? Cr, Warr-No; I have no desire to go to t e cemetery, (Laughter). The president seconded,-Carried, AIiIITIONAL COST OF ELECTRIC IIGHT CABLE. The town clerk, Northcote, wrote for warding copy of letter sent to Preston's electrical engineers re extra cost of cable, Preston's full share would be £815. Northcoto would like a confer once so that the matter could be amic ably discussed. Cr. Bricknell moved that the matt...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NORTHCOTE POLICE COURT. MONDAY, 2ND MARCH. [Before Dr. Cole, P.M., and Messrs Hayes, Stott, Dennis and Brown, J's.P.] "THE PACE THAT KILLS." [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 7 March 1914

NORTHCOTE POLICE COURT. MONDAY, 2ND MARCH. [Before Dr. Cole, P.M., and Messrs Hayes,. Stott, Dennis qnd Brown, J'sP.] "THE PACE THAT KILLS." Victor Yann was charged with riding a motor cycle in High street at a pace dangerous to traffic. Constable Fletcher said as defendant passed him he let it full out and fairly flew away from him, at a speed he estimated at 30 miles per hour. Defendant said he could not do such a speed on the wet blocks. Vernon Widdows gave evidence that defendant appeared to be going twice as fast as the trams. : b Fined £2, with 5s costs. A young man named Victor Allerdon was charged with the same offence. The constablo said that at 7.30 on the morning of February' 7, when the road was full of traffic, defendant rode along High street, going north, at a speed of 25 miles an hour. Dr. Cole, P.M., said this sort of thing must be stopped in the crowded suburbs. There was a growing tendency amongst motor car drivers and motor cyclists to go fast. The practice was v...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 7 March 1914

A REAL HOME LESSON, F".nTsi, .,t) l)DAumu'rst ifrAL, TIIEllt Cu'rs AlND S?AIus wITIr ZAYD.BUKr T thiisanids oif Iluones Z uin Buk is daily d'rnnstraling its wonderful utility as a first-aid fur accidents Re. mnr'kable solthing and antiseptic pro. porlis makn Zam-Buk an ideal lIaier fr cuts, bruises, hur.es, scalds, sprijns, etc. Z tn-Buk subdues pain ard iiflnlnmation, prevents festering, and ensures a speedy and perfect re lief. The experience of Mrs, O S. Bay., Cawthorne street, Southwark, Adelaide is a typical instance, "My children," shile says, "are always in the wars, but thanks to Z'un-Buk, their injuries are speadily healed. My little girl Tholma fell and cut her knee cap. Thie wound was very deep and for a few days sihe was practioally a cripple, Ordinary remedies did her no good. I then applied Zam-Buk, which in a few days healed her knee splendidly, "My eldest daughter, Kathleen, severely sealded her arm with steam from the kettle, Hier arm blistered up in a fearful manne...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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