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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

U,iu ....Li.j.wmKmmimmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmammmammmmmmmmmmmmmHmmmmmmMmmM - r.--s: vf& ' vy&tfgyqtfr'K - V"r"'V'TmW' 'mr mpmrF7w w-r-vo; -jp-r THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 49 I "? , a seen her glory and hor prerogatives shadowed forth in every chapter and on every page. As for the New Testament, no special superiority of intelligence is required to discover therein ample guarantee for all the honor paid to Mary by even the most enthusiastic of her devotees; and it argues a positive perversion of ordinary common-sense to assert that Mary's place in the Gospel narrative is insignificant or obscure. No insistence on two or three isolated circumstances, such as the incident that occurred at the marriage of Cana circumstances explained in a fashion discredited by the Gospel itself, can avail to lessen the magnificent role which Our Lady plays in the stor' of the Evangelists. For, after all, what does the Gospel tell us of Mary? It tells of a Virgin greeted by an Angel in the name of God; of a wo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

-" t frT""r ftir' mfarnrfm 50 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. -, y,. jpJJVJVJ-T I all beings. More beautiful than the Cherubim and Seraphim and all the angelical army, an earthly voice or even that of an angel is too weak fit tingly to praise her. 0 blessed Virgin, purest dove, celestial spouse, 0 Mary, heaven, ternplo and throne of the Di vinity, you possess the Sun which illumines heaven and earth, Jesus Christ. The angels accused Eve, but now they glorify Mary, who has rehabilitated fallen Eve and opened heaven to Adam expelled from Eden. For Mary is the mediatrix of heaven and earth, uniting these two extremes " And so on, in a strain of glowing panegyric unsur passed by the most devoted servants of Our Lady in any succeeding age. Thus in both the written and un written word of God in Holy Writ and Tradition we Catholics have the full est and most ample warrant for all we teach and believe concerning God's Holy Mother, and a steadfast guarantee that the special devotions by which we honor ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

wetssaggammmmmmm wmmmmmmmmmmm WT"" THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 51 more potent than wo ourselves oft-times realize. As for the Rosary, recited as it should bo with genuine medita tion on each special mystery in the Joyful, Sorrowful, and Glorious de cades, it is safe to say that no other formula of praise or prayer is so agree able to our Blessed Mother, or so likely to obtain for us the fullest granting of the requests we venture to lay at her feet. It need not be said that during Our Lady's especially consecrated month., more if possible than at any other peri od of the ecclesiastical year, our prayers should be marked by the most undoubt ing confidence. Now, if ever, we may count with the fullest certitude on her benignant indulgence and ready acqui escence in such of our wishes as are compatiable with our best interests. Now, if ever, we may plead with the assurance of winning our Mother's in fallible aid in rendering our pleading efficacious for perseverence in grace; for strength and ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

52 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. THE WAY OF THE CROSS.

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

lmVP Vf "W-WwjimvujiifimmtWtmint mmfmjumnm n t t "Hfiymp,; MPin THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 53 JS?- The Wichita, Kichai and Delaware. Closely associated with the Caddo, on the same reservation, are the Wichita, with their sub-tribes; the Tawakoni and Waco, numbering together 31G in 1893; the Delaware, numbering 94, and the Kikai, numbering only 52 of these, all but the Delaware, who are Algon quian, belong to the Caddoan stock. The Wichita and their sub-tribes, al though retaining in indistinct form, the common Caddoan tradition, claim as their proper home theWichita moun tains, near which they still remain. Sixty years ago their principal village was on the north side of the north fork of Red river, a short distance below the mouth of Elm creek, in Oklahoma. They live in conical grass houses, and like the other tribes of their stock, are agricultural. The Kichai are a small tribe of the same stock, and claim to have moved up Red river in company with the Caddo. Their language is different...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

. '' twwqwmwWMW'WmMm 54 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. THE PROPAGATION OF THE FAITH. Movement to Reorganize the Society in all the dioceses of the country. A movement is now on foot through out the country to reorganize in every parish the pre-eminently Catholic So ciety for the Propagation of the Faith. Very Rev. A. Magnien is the general director and Rev. H. Granjon, assistant director and secretary of the associa tion, with headquarters at St. Mary's Seminary, Baltimore, Md. The work dearest to the heart of the Son of God is the salvation of souls, which is brought about by the spread of the Gospel. In the beginning the Apostles went as far into the "whole world" for this purpose as the short ness of their lives and the difficulties of travel allowed, and their followers went on and kept up preaching and teaching till the kingdom of Christ was soon more widespread than the mighty Roman Empire had ever been. Then came political and social wrecks and changes for a thousand years, so that lit...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

nrffrip'i i-wpyw ? yjpjjnwi'MfiwjfrHitwjj wt THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 55 Catholic American has scarcely be stowed one-sixth of one cent. Of course wo have, with God's blessing, done wonders. .Wo have not moved moun tains, perhaps, but we have raised them, in the way of building churches, schools, asylums, etc. Wo have pre served the faith among the masses of our immigrants, and this is very much the same as propagating it. Now that wo are, most of us, in what may be considered easy circumstances, should we not think not only of our needy brethren within the limits of the Repub lic, but also of the heathen world be yond? The rights of property are sacred, and to the owner belongs its administration, but tho rich must still remember that they are only stewards of God and that their surplus belongs to the disinherited ones. This is true of churches as well as of individuals. When will we Catholics imitate the various Protestant societies in their en deavor to Christianize the world? In vie...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

56 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Sources of the Evils of Modern Society. The first is Pride, which draws us away from God, to whom, inasmuch as it is from Him we have received every thing we have, everything must be returned. Paramount in our days is Love of Self I Vain, glorious man boldly says to God: Thou art Lord, but I also will be Lord; Thou art God, but I also will be God; Thou teachest " There is no other God besides me;" but I reply, "Besides myself there is no God. The mouth is mine, and I will blaspheme as I please; the heart is mine and I will corrupt it as I think proper; mine is the flesh, and I will gratify it with sinful indulgence." Man, separated from God, by deny ing the Being who created him, exalts himself, not only above God, but above his fellow-men, whom he regards only in reference to himself, but never him self in reference to them; he esteems nothing but what ministers to his self love, what furthers his ambitious ends, or flatters his vanity; he sacrifices everyth...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

'"B V'lWB'iiyjrj swwnawn mw "w.' r"flt " TWgtyJKfljTwitBfr" - t5?,"'"lt"' THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 67 What a lesson! It reminds us of the words of Solomon: "All is vanity ex cept to love God and servo Him alone." To the rich St. Joseph will offer the example of how to respect and love the poor, our equals, not servants and sub jects, and who have been called by God not wretched, but blessed. And you, who are poor, learn from Nazareth how God honors the poor; but be re signed, not the rebellious poor, the poor who love and pray, not the poor who curse and harbor hatred. He who curses hatred against the rich merely because of their riches, is not poor with the poverty of Jesus; ho who covets the goods of others is no longer poor in spirit, he cursed for his sinful desires. When then, 0 ye poor, are refused the leavings from the tables of the rich, think of St. Joseph, who consoles you, saying: "Poverty is no dishonor, neither is wealth sanctity nor happi ness. I, too, have suffered, and m...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

58 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. I has not had its golden ago, before Pan dora's box was loosed, when women were nymphs and dryads, and men were gods and heroes? and when the race lies crushed and groaning beneath an alian yoke, how natural is the dream of a redeemer, an Arthur, who shall return from exile or awake from some long sleep to drive out the usur per and win back for his people what they have lost. The hope becomes a faith and the faith becomes the creed of priests and prophets, until the hero is a god and the dream a religion, looking to some great miracle of nature for its culmination and accomplishment. The doctrines of the Hindu avatar, the Hebrew messiah, the Christian millen nium, and the Hesunanin of the Indian ghost dance, are essentially the same, and have their origin in a hope and longing common to all humanity. Probably every Indian tribe, north and south, had its early hero god, the ' great doer or teacher of all first things, from the Inskeha and Manabozho of the rud...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

"" ir'piiwrifffw ( j"V!? ?ttF "IE W!l" VW unv "JTC- i THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 50 alike in Haiti, Mexico, Yucatan, and Peru. The simple native welcomed the white strangers as tho children or kin dred of their, long-lost benefactor, im mortal beings whose near advent had been foretold by oracles and omens, whose faces borrowed from tho bright ness of tho dawn, whose glistening armor seemed woven from the rays of sunlight, and whose god-like weapons were the lightning and the thunder bolt Their first overbearing demands awakened no resentment; for may not tho gods claim their own, and is not resistance to the divine will a crime? Not until their most sacred tilings were trampled under foot, and the streets of the holy city itself ran red with the blood of their slaughtered princes, did they read aright the awful prophecy by the light of their blazing temples, and know that instead of the children of an incarnate god they had welcomed a horde of incarnate devils. Tho light of civilization ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

ijyi yyiTrv,'Tfcy',WiPlHFlW vq&w f mwfMW ! ' 1FW- 60 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. "jwnr ". prise that many Spaniards in the Pueblo country, priests, soldiers and civilians were killed, and the survivors, after holding out for a time under Gov ernor Otermin at Sante Fo, fled to El Paso, and in October there remained not a single Spaniard in all New Mexico. Despite their bitter disappointment, the southern nations continued to cher ish the hope of a coming redeemer, who now assumed the character of a terrible avenger of their wrongs, and the white skin conqueror has had a bloody occa sion to remember that his silent peon, as he toils by blue Chapala or sits amid the ruins of his former grandeur in the dark forests of Yucatan, yet waits ever and always the coming of the day which shall break the power of the alien Spaniard and restore to their inheritance the children of Ana huac and Mayapau. In Peru the na tives refused to believe that .the last of the Incas had perished a wanderer in the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

' v-t-"'1 n '.""44," i i'wiyywiiiinj"i,WP'!i' W ""? "gWW'JK1 umibhmm -JRMTJHf T yw- THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 01 Itye jXpgcl ofjpargatory. How many sweet reminiscenes this title recalls to a Christian mind. A Plea for the Departed. How soon forgotten arc the dear ones gone before ue, When hid beyond the portals of tho tomb ; How soon we turn to worship other idols, And leave them there in cold, unsolaccd gloom. They may be suffering in that far-off country, Torments from which our prayers could gain relief, Denied tho sight of tho All-Father's glory Tho' past the power of sinning, sore their grief, They call to us for help for kindly succor, But worldly cars heed not the spirit cry; And iugratc hearts intent on selfish pleasures, Unmindful of their need, pass coldly by. If love be strong as death, why leave unransomed The dear ones sleeping 'ncath the churchyard sod, "When one short prayer, perchance, would burst the fetters That bar the yearning flight to God? In after years you may be ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

62 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. because wo do not pray for the saints nor for the damned. Does not the Bible tell us of offerings on tombs and sacrifices for the dead? Tobias exhorts his son to place bread and wine on the tomb of the just. And those men who fasted for seven days at the death of Saul! Further on we listen to the songs of David which celebrate the joys of souls who have passed through tribulation to a better life. Isaiah affirms that God will purify the stains of man. And, finally, when Judaic civilization was in its decline, we see Judas Maccabeas, who after a battle with the idolaters, not only commands the dead to be buried honorably, but orders a collection and sends to Jeru salem 72,000 drahms of silver for the offering of a sacrifice to God in their honor. When Christ came He had no need to prove this doctrine, as He proved that of His divinity and His resurrection. He merely records it by saying: "Take heed while ye have life to conform to the laws of God, lest ye fall...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

slr ww-vw THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 03 w . for the dead. What had ho discovered against this doctrine? Nothing, abso lutely nothing! He denied Purgatory in consequence of his own theories. "We are all saints," he said. But this was too ridiculous to be maintained. Even the Protestants admit of Purga tory, only they do not agree about the definition of the dogma. The Protes tant Haase wrote: "Those who die are too good to go to Hell, but are too bad to go to Paradise." Therefore there must be a place where souls are puri fied to merit eternal glory. Do Maistre observes: "Protestants will have Pur gatory, for they retain that there must be a place where souls become purified." What is this place if not Catholic Pur--gatory? Our heart and our reason both require it. Reason says: "If God exists, Purgatory must also exist; J if there is no Purgatory there can be no God." This may appear startling, but listen to me. If God exists, He exists as a just God, because if ho were not just, IIo would...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

64 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. who would have courage to make an act of hope? Without Purgatory there is no middle path between presumption and despair. And, indeed, what hope can a sinner have who, hardened in crime, is subject to the immense diffi culty of repenting in this life and the impossibility of purifying himself in another? And for the sick man who would return to God at the last moment of his life, what consolation? And now, without Purgatory, can we assure ourselves of the fate of those who die under our eyes? However good be the conceit in which we" hold our father and our mother, or our friend, we can not be blind to their share of the defects inherent to the children of men. And, therefore, what comfort could our anxious hearts receive on their account? The corpse of your mother or of your wife lies before you. This woman whom you have so much loved, and whom you still love -.say! Is she saved or lost? Terrible question! "I know not," you reply. Still more terrible answer! ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

wmmmmmm mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm The Indian Advocate. Devoted to the Interests of Indian Missions. Vol. X. JULY, 1898. No. 3. May the 11th, 1S77, Father Felix DeGrasse, 0. S. B., accompanied by a sub-deacon and a lay brother, arrived in the Potawattomio country and put up his tent where now Sacred Heart Mission stands. May the 11th, 189S, lit. Rev. Abbot Felix DeGrasse was sol emnly blessed second Abbot of Sacred Heart Abbey. In 1877 the subject of this sketch said Mass in a log cabin, 10x12, which served at the same time as kitchen, study room, refectory, etc., etc. In 1S98 his blessing is performod in a magnificent church, surrounded by many and spacious buildings. If it was our sad duty to chronicle the demise of the late Abbot Duperon, it is comforting for us to feel that wo again have a leader omnibus cams, quia Abbot Felix DeGrasse, O. S. B. . omnibus paler, beloved by all, because he is a father to all, broad minded as it becomes a genuine Benedictine learned and pious...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

66 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. the churches and schools ho has built. Abbot DeGrasso was born in Bacourt, diocese of Nancy (France), March 1, 1842. At the age of twenty-two he joined the Benedictines, 1864. Ho made his studies in Rome, under Franzelin and Balerini, was recalled to France in 1S71 to bo ordained. Soon afterwards we find him assistant priest at St Benedict, the ancient Floury in the diocese of Orleans, from thence he came to America, 1877. Master of novices and pastor of the Pottawntto mie Indians till 1886, he was appointed pastor of the Osage Indians where he remained till the opening of Oklahoma 18S9. Guthrie was his next field of labor, and after some time spent in the abbey he resumed missionary work at the opening of the Pottawattomie, Sac and Fox country. On February the 10th of this year his brethren in St. Benedict chose him to succeed the late deceased abbot and as such, after confirmation from Rome, he was solemly installed as second Abbot of Sacred Heart, by the V...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

07 Our Drinks and our Drunkards. By John A THE INDTAN ADVOCATE. "Drink it down! Drink it down! Drink it down!" So runs tlio cheering, classic refrain of the American hymn to Bacchus. Drink down what? Oh! the "good old brandy punch," the "good old whiskey punch," the "good old claret punch," the "good old Bour bon whiskey," the "good old Burgundy wine," the "good old Rhine wine" in "deep, deep draughts." San eta simplicitas. Within the last fifty years there has been an extraordinary increase in the consumption of alcoholic drinks. A really serious man could seriously say that "modern progress" has been lifted to its present dizzy height on a moun ting wave of rum. Among the nations we have not been specially favored. Here the wave has risen no higher than in Germany, Holland, Belgium, Norway, or England. Probably the French do not top the wave-crest. But how noble their striving! In 1850 the feeble Frenchmen of the incubating Empire sipped a miserable thirteen million gallons; in 18...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

G8 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, thing itself has changed or gone. Think you that today the word "liquor" means what it meant fifty years ago? or the word "alcohol," or "wine," or "drunkard," or "sot" ? Probably you have not thought much about the mat tor. Well, then, a few minutes given to the consideration of facts may help a thoughtful answer. The alcohol of alcohols is the "spirit of wine" grape alcohol, to speak unscientifically. This is the alcohol of good brandy, cthylic alcohol, the least hurtful of all alcohols. Nature has distributed alcohol generally, but spa ringly. It is present in spring-water, in the river, in the soil. Fortunately, alcohol cannot be profitably distilled from springs and rivers. If it could, what a luxury water would be. How ever, alcohol can be manufactured profitably from any substance that con tains a given quantity of starch. The starch is transformed into sugar, and from sugar into alcohol. From corn, rye and wheat we get the alcohols which, in the form w...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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