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Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 3,206 items from Anti-Slavery Bugle, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 2 June 1848

THE ANTI-SLAVERY BUGLE. It published every Friday, at .Salem, Colum biana Co., Ohio, by the Executive Committee of the Western Anti-Slavery Societv i and is the only paper in the Great West which advocates accession from pro-slavery governifienU and pro-slavery church organi zations. It is edited by Usui. S. nnd J. E lizadeth Jones; and while urging upon tho people the duty of holding No union with Slaveholders," either in Church or State, as tha only consistent position an abolitionist can occupy, and as the hett means for the de struction of slavery; it will, so far as its lim its permit, give a history ol ttie daily progress of the anti-slavery cause-exhibit the policy I and practice of slaveholders, and by facts ami arguments endeavor to increase the zeal and activity of every true lover of Freedom addition to its a'.li-slavcrv m.ii M. u '" addition to its anti-slavery matter, it will mm genoral news, choice extracts, moral tales, &c. It is to bn hoped that all the friends o...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 2 June 1848

One Week Later from Europe. ARRIVAL OF THE CALEDONIA. The French Elections—Opening of the National Assembly—Treaty of Russia with Sweden and Denmark—Stale of Germany—of Italy —Riot in Limerick. . Dupoiii, (do I'Eiro,) tho President pro i. proclaiming the Republic. The CunnrJ Sinamcr Cumbria nrrivoil at Boston on Sunday, and the lloriii-tn at this port on Monday, with Feven days later new. The news they bring from Franca is espe cially rlieerinsj. That from otlicr parts of Ihe continent in of less imprest. The National Assembly met on llio 4 ill inst. and was organized with most imposing rolemnittes, M. lent, nroclaiimn; the I!epn!)lic Some disturbances have taken place tit Rouen, Amiens, Rnchetort, and Marseilles, arising partly from Ilia excitement of the. elec tions, and partly the dissatisfaction of tlie working-men. Older, however, was prompt ly restored, and nt the latest dates quiet rvigns nil over France. There tiresome symptoms, however, of difficulty in Paris between the pe...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 2 June 1848

A Threatened Revolution. No class of persons Bre more bitter In llieir denunciations of ihe rcvoluliorary movements of Disunionists, than tlio members of the so railed Democratic party. They care not for the end these movements are designed to ef fect the securing to man his birthright of freedom, llie enfranchisement of the slaves ot the land, the elevation of the laborer are noth ing, or less than nothing in their estimation ; they see hut the mean9 by which it is propo sed to gain these ends, and with pretended horror denounce Disunion as treason, and re sistance to iniquitous laws as the blackest of crimes. But when party ends are to he at tained, when a Democratic majority is to bo secured, they can resort to revolution, Ihry can clog the wheels of government by their illegal proceedings, c.in threaten to overthrow the civil authority, and frame a new Consti tulion to suit themselves. There is not trea son in this, but all is right, and proper, and democratic, for they aim to p...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 2 June 1848

MISCELLANEOUS. From the Union Magazine. The Power of Love BY L. MARIA CHILD. It was one of Ireland's greenest Lines that wound its wny down to a rippling brook in the rear of Friend Goodman's house. And there, by a mound of rocks that dipped their mossy feet in the rivulet, Friend Goodman walked slowly, watching for his little daugh ter, who had been spending the day with some children in the Neighborhood. Present ly, the small maiden came jumping along, with her bonnet thrown back, and the edges of hur soft brown ringlet luminous in (lie rays of the setting sun. Those pretty curls wero not Quakerly ; but Nature, who pays no more attention to the regulations of Elders, than she does to the edicts of Oishops, would have it so. At the slightest breath of mois ture, the silky hair rolled itself into spirals, and clustered around her pure white forehead, as if it loved the nestling place. Jumping, likewise, was not a Quakerly proceeding. but little Alice, usually staid and demure, in im...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 9 June 1848

THE ANTI-SLAVERY BUGLE Is published every Friday, at Sa'tm, Colum biana Co., Ohio, by the Executive Committee of the Wistkrn Anti-Slavkrv Socistv; and is the only paper in the Great West j which advocates secession from pro-slavery i government- and pro-slavery church organi- I z.itions. It is edited by S. and J. K- ' l.tiAHKTii Jo.nki; and while urging upon tho people the duty of holding "No union with Slavohol Jers," ilhnr in Church or Stale, ns ' the only consistent position an abolitionist can occupyi and as the lie si means fur the (in struction of slavery J it will, so fur as its Inn- ' its permit, Rive a history of the daily progress of the anti-slavery cause exhibit the policy and practice of slaveholders, and by fact nrnl ; arguments endeavor to increase the zeal ami activity of every true lover of Freedom. In addition to its anti-slavery matter, it will con tain general nows, choice extracts, moral tales, kc. It is to bn hoped that all the friends of the Western Anti-Slave...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 9 June 1848

ly ran tolhe "quarter" for their breakfast ; it being on his way, be went with them, and saw them receive their gourds of cold mush, containing about two spoonsfull for each, and they kindly offered him gome, but he look leave, and walked home ruminating on their condition, and querying why it was, lhcs,o lively, sensible, and kind liule creatures might not be free ns ho was. A deep sense of the injustice of slavery fixed mi big mind, which increased with time and observation. He was afterwards the means of convincing their master's son, so that ho formed a reso lution never to own a slave; and leaving the Stale without any assistance from his father, settled in Ohio. At ten years of age, my bro ther was apprenticed to a tailor in Virginia, where he was exposed to many snares and trials. Our father was a man of strict jus tice and integrity, and truly christian spirit and conduct, hut having placed his son in a settlement of Friends, and with a member of the Society, he trusted ail ...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 9 June 1848

The Meetings Advertised for Henry C. Wright and Chailes C. Burleigh are to be anti-slavery meetings. Our readers probably queried as we did when we saw the notice of their appointments, " What kind of meetings do they design hol dingt" Henry C. Wright has informed us that up to the time of the Anniversary of the Western A. S. Society, they design laboring in conjunction with that body, although they do not come as the agents of any anti-slavery organization; and at his suggestion the Kx. Committee have requested one of the Socie ty's agents James W. Walker to Bttend with them the series of meetings that have been appointed, and make it his special busi ness to obtain subscribers for the Bugle, re ceive subscriptions due on the paper and such donations as the friends of the cause may see proper to contribute to the funds of the Society. The labors of these friends will doubtless do much to advance the anti-slavery cause in the West; and we trust that their efforts will be so heartily...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 9 June 1848

POETRY. For the Bugle. Address to Northern Freemen. t Ye Xorlliern Freemen, rise ye up . In all your niihiy strength and pride; No longer drink the bitter cup Of Slavery "i foul ami sick'ning tide; No longer move nitli lapid strido To crush your brelhrr n o tlie dust Their cms and ti ara no more deride, Nor give them o'er to Slavery's trust. Ye sturdy Nurthmcn, bear no yoke, And spurn the clanking clinin away; Heed not tlie politician's croak The heartless minion of a day: Hut hold yourselves in firm array Against this monster, crying sin, The hand of ruin yo can stay, Let Freedom's buttle now begin. Hear ye that stricken mother';) cry, As from her breast her balm is torn ? And ean ye now stand roolly by, And see it to the monster borne.? Of freedom's spirit are ye shorn, That ye delay to give your aid, And let this suffering mother mourn O'er her fond hopes in darkness laid? Then rise ye up, If ye can feel For the chained captive's grievous wrong, Not by the aid of martial steel Bu...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 16 June 1848

THE ANTI-SLAVERY BUGLE Is published every Friday, at Salem, Colum bian Co., OA 10, by Ihe Executive Committee of the Wests Anti-Slavcry Sociktv; and is the onlv rianer in the Great V est which advocates secession from pro-slavery government and pro-slavery church organi utions. It is edited by Bicrw. S. and J. E lizabkth Jonss) and while urging upon the paopla the duty of holding "No union with Slaveholders." eithor in Church or Slate, as the only consistent position an aboliiinnist can occupy, and as the Oral means for the de struction of slavery ; it will, so far as its lim its permit, give n history of the daily progress of the anti-sl ivory canse exhibit the policy and practice of slaveholders, and by facts mid arguments endeavor to increase the zeal and activity of every true lover of Freedom. In addition to its anti-slavery matter, it will con tain general news, choice extracts, moral tales, &c. It is to be hoped that all the friends of the Western Anti-Slavery Society all...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 16 June 1848

1 hutch, or rail.oi, walk iilone as its single re- I'rescrilative, to sever !. film's tint seemed l') hurt liim to his kind, let ,jm trust Cod, that He will pour into his boRom ten fold Ptrcngtli, that consistency shall mere rebuke the world about him than thousands who make r compromise with their consciences, and barter right lot svailnhilily. Hut I have spcki n too long, therefore. 1 bid you farewell. My subject would take more hours than I could rod; hours to-day, to lo justice to it; but commending il lo your careful consideration, whether wnli tiie expe rience of the last fifty years bofora us, nnd the present asprcts of the political world, there it any hope lor the salvation of ;hc slave, xcept in such a radical convulsion as w ill hike society from its wry foundations. When you bavc come to that conviction, do not count the progress by the numbers. Aro WO not surrounded by 4rt,CO0 women of Scol land (pointinrr to the Addn ss,";? Have wo not fronds of liberty on tho rthrr si...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 16 June 1848

To Correspondents. K. S. of P. Ilia S?l oops not pny Tor a j year. The price is !jil..r)0 if not paid within three months, and at that rate we have cred ited him. H. C. The amount against B. I'. C. is $l,n3. , S. N.S. Tim balance yet standing against him is 21 els., which lie will please forward, D. 1). lie owes 30 cts. Sorry he disenn- j tinup.9 because lie can read one that 19 Bent gratis. J. C. of II. The P. F. is 0 a year, the P. 15. $1. We cannot send 50 cts. to each without subjecting theiti to a heavy t.ix for postage on specie ; we therefore retain the money subject to his order. J. II. We made a mem. of his request at the time, but in a newspaper establishment exceptions to a general rule stand but a poor chance of being tinted. lie is credited as requested. The simplest way to discontinue a paper, is to request the Post Master to in form the publisher that your time is out and you desire no longer to receive it. P. II. He yet owes 32 cts. adding the postage on his letter, ...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 16 June 1848

POETRY. From Graham's Magazine. The Human Voice. BY GEORGE P. MORRIS. We all love ihe music of ky, earth and sea Tliechirp oflhe cricket Hie hum oflhe bee The wind-harp that (Mings from the bough of the tree The reed of the rude shepherd boy i All love the bird-carols when day has begun, When rock-fountains gush into song as they run, When the stars of the morn sing their hymns to the sun, And hills clap their hands in their joy. All love the invisible, lures of the air The chords that vibrato io the hands of the fair Whose minstrelsy brightens the midnight of care, 9 And steals to the henrt like a dove : But, even in melody, there is a shoice, And, though we in all her sweet numbers rejoice, There's none thrill's the soul like the tones of her voice. When breathed by the being we love. ' j : i From the Herald of Truth. Cradle Song. BY ALICE CAREY. Weary of the lumber's part, My sweet baby, never; I will r ck thee on my heart, Ever yes, furevir! Loveliest of lovely thing, Pure as th...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 23 June 1848

THE ANTI-SLAVERY BUGLE Is published every Friday, at Salem, Colum biana Co., Ohio, by the Kxecutive Committee of the Western Anti-Slavery Society; and ia the only paper in the Great West which advocate secession from pro-slavery governments and pro-slavery church otgani Rations. It is edited by Benj. S. and J. h MZAntTH Jones; and while urging upon the people the duty of holding "No union with Slaveholders," eithor in Church or State, ni the only consistent position an abolitionist can occupy, and as the bcit means for the de struction of slavery i it will, so far as its lim its permit, give a history of the daily progress of the anti-slavery cause exhibit the policy and practice of slaveholders, and by facts and arguments endeavor to increase the zeal and activity of every true lover of Freedom. In addition to its anti-slavery matter, it will con tain general news, choice extracts, moral tales, Kc. It is to be hoped that all the friends of the Westorn Anti-Slavery Society nil the a...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 23 June 1848

The Union. T.Pt lis row pp.i tn the political heresies wiih w Inch we iii.i chared. We am di'un ionisls. We dene unci! the turn, (lie puties, Ihe lawn, the constitution of our country, unci for this loasoii, we have sworn to two prima ty plnlirra us the yrmnid work nf our liven, i ml tbev ( these. I. Wa will resolve to lie fpij irrf't d from all support ol Ilia niTiircd : system vf slavery, il.tvinjr purified our own hands, we will abolish this system il j possib'e by our i forts tiiid our devotions to I this piiiimry object lifelong. Now the union of llieso Siate htu Ivvi relations. One t" Hippo is, lis relation n inn Individual cili7.cn, w ho swears t'j support lice constitution iir.ilrr which allies each voter of tin- country with the slaveholder of '.! Noir.li ns ti i .- partner and gcirdbn. Now I hold it, as every nV liiinnist holds it, to Ih the dictate nf common honesty tli;.l a man should cither admit ill it lie is satisfied In he n slaveholder cr that lie should Bii y to On...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 23 June 1848

tiling but your daily labor to louk sifter, anJ when that is done lake your needful rest. Neither is it necessary for you to think of lay ing up unythingagBinstold Age, as white pen ! are obliged to do; lor the laws of the country have provided that you shall not be turned oh"" w hen you are past labor, but shall lin maintained while you live, by those you belong to, whether you are able lo work or not. And these are great and real advanta ges, for which, il you consider things right ly, you cannot but thank Almighty liod, who lialh so wiselv nrovid.d for your well lipinu here, and your eternal happiness hereafter." : I The New England Convention. Which is always one of the most spirit-!ir-tiiiir gatherings of abolitionists, is represent ed to have been unusually interesting this year. Although the weather was itntavora- ble a portion of the time, yet .he attendance ,' , . . , ,. . , was large, and the anti-slavery Inends gave the most substantial tokens of interest in the cause of ...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 23 June 1848

POETRY. The Snow Drop in the Poor Man's Window. It was darksome alley, Where light bul seldom shone, Save when at noon a sun-ray touched The lulls sill of stone. Beneath the poor man's window, Whose weary life whi bound To waste, nt one dull ceaseless task, The passing seasons' round. Spring's dewy breath of perfume, And summer's wealth of flowers. Or the changing hue of Autumn's leaves, Ne'er blest his lonely hours. He knew, too well, when Winter Came howling forth again He knew it by his fireless grain, The wind and plashing rain! Pierced by the frost-wind's biting, His cheerless task he plied ; Want chain'd him ever to the loom Dy the little window's side. But when the days grew longer, . He stole onehappy hour, To tend within a broken vase, A pale and Blunder flower. How tenderly he mov'd it, To catch the passing ray, And smiled to seo its folded leaves Grow greener every day ! His faded eyes were lif.ej oft To watch the snowdrop bloom, To him it seemed a star of light Within th...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 30 June 1848

THE ANTI-SLAVERY BUGLE la published every Friday, at Salem, Colum biana Co., Ohio, by the Executive Committee Of tilt) WksTKRN A.NTI-St,AVERV Sot'lKTV; and is the only paper in the Great West which advocates secession from pro-slavery government and pro-slavery church organi zations. It is edited by Uknj. S. and J. E i.izahutii Jonks; and while urging upon the poopla the duty of holding "No union with Slaveholders," either in Church or Slate, as the only consistent position an abolitionist can occupy, and as the beil means for the de struction of slavery ; it will, so far as its lim its permit, (five a history of the daily progress of the anti-slavery cause exhibit the policy and practice of slaveholders, and by facts arid arguments endeavor to increase the zeal and activity of every true lover of Freedom. In addition to its anti-slavery matter, it w ill con tain general news, choice extracts, moral tales, tic. It is to be hoped that all the friends of the Western Anti-Slavery Socie...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 30 June 1848

day w lien we liave thought the promise of llie I slave's speedy redemption and our own tic- I livcrance I'roni the slave power, so c heertng a at this hour. Stand JSrii, nnd see trie Mi ration that will lie wrought for u. I he muntrv ha. loner nroaned beneath the thral dom of party chains. These chains will now Im sna'P':u Konuui, , U ho van doubt I I'kkkuum against Suvkkv the result J True Democrat. i , COMMUNICATIONS. Notes from the Lecturing Field. I arrived at Pittsburgh on the evening 0f j the 11th, where I met 11. C, Wright, arid on the following day C. C. Burleigh. Our first meeting was held on tho evening of the 1,'ith which, considering thn size of tho place, the importance of the subject, and the character of the speakers, was small ; while on the oth er hand, considering the number of churches, the power and corruption of the priesthood, the strength and subserviency r.f political par ties, and the money-loving propensities of the nnnnln. u-na rpsnpit:,Mp. If those rllUr...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 30 June 1848

Such ore, as wo believe, the doctrines I laiiglit by Dr. Humphrey in the extracts we ! have quoted, nnd in the Pastoral Letter from which they were taken. It in true, they nro more fully expressed, nud rendered into sit.i plrr English than the author chose to use, ; hut in meaning are essentially the same; nnd 1 if a doubt remained as to what he really dc- ' fipmd to teach, the practice of the Church and Clergy, the submission of the lay mem bers and thp despotism of the priests, would confirm us in the conviction that the aim of ! the letter referred to, is to niantain the supre- : niacy of the latter and the debasement of the former to secure to the priesthood the right to say what doctrines shall he taught to the people, who shall be permitted to teach them, and when and where tliey maybe taught. If the people were permitted to examine for themselves, to investigate, without let orhin derance, all subjects they might desire to discuss any qur slion they might please, the authorit...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 30 June 1848

POETRY. POETRY. The Exiles---A Tale of New England. HI JOHN OREKNLEAlf WIllTTIKR. f The incidents upon which the following ballad has its foundation, occurred about the year 1GCO. Thomas Macey was one of the lirst, if not the first, white settler of Nan tucket. A quaint description of his singular and perilous voyage, in his own handwriting, is still preserved. The goodman sat beside the door One sultry afternoon, Willi his young wife singing at his side A quaint and goodly tune. A glimmer of heat was in the air The dark green woods were still; And the skirts of a heavy ihunder-cioud Hung over the western hill. Black, thick, and vast, arose that cloud Above the wilderness, As some dark world from upper air Were stooping over this. At times, the solemn thunder pealed, And all was still agi.in, Save a low murmur in the uir Of coming wind and rain. Just as the first big rain-drop ft II, A weary stranger came, And stood before llie fanner's door. With travel soiled and lame. Sad seemed ...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
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