ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
5,371 results
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1904

Winter Dairying vs. Summer Dairying. The fact that some of our dairymen are seriously considering the advis ability of changing from winter, or all-the-year dairying to that of spring and summer dairying, makes the ques lions involved of more than usual in terest and importance. It would ap pear, generally speaking, that a single cause is responsible for the situation— the extraordinary high price of mill feed that has prevailed during the last two or three years, without a corres pondingly high price for dairy pro ducts. Such a condition becomes all the more interesting when we notice the turn matters appear to be taking in our sister state of Oregon, where at the recent convention of the state dairymen the burden of advice given to the dairymen was in the direction of winter dairying. Evidently, spring and summer dairying continues to be the general practice there. The writer was among the first to advocate and practice winter dairying in this state, and can see no good rea son fo...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1904

10 Poultry Interests More Consideration to Utility. In the opinion of the writer a flock of superior laying hens seldom conies by accident, and never by indifference. Such a flock is solely the product of evolution —the result of watcL'ulness, study and patience. Thus it is that we can account for so comparatively lew flocks of superior layers. At the same time such a flock is within the reach of most owners of chickens. We firmly believe in poultry exhibi tions, also in poultry fanciers; we think, however, owing to the acknowl edged importance that the hen holds as a commercial factor in the estima tion of the public, there should be another recognized class to be known as the poultry breeder. The prolific laying qualities overshadow every o.h er consideration with many in select- ing hens for their flocks, while others, equally as enthusiastic, are attracted by the standard form, plumage, mark ings, etc., and give but little heed to the laying qualities. We sometimes fear that the...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1904

Winter Shoeing of Horses. At this time of year, when horses must be shod, all that is needed in the case of a healthy foot is to rasp off the wall to its proper dimensions and let the foot go at that, leaving the sole as thick as may be and the frog as big and strong and elastic as Nature makes it. To ruthlessly slash away the outside horny covering and let the soft semi-fatty tissue of the frog come in contact with the ground is barbar ous and must handicap the horse in traveling until the frog shall have again grown a protecting covering for the more tender parts of the great cushion which has been placed in the center of his foot to take up the jar and keep his legs sound. It is positively wonderful why farm ers will insist in thus having their horses' feet maltreated. It is not right, of course, to let the toes of the feet grow too long, but it is better to err on this side than to have them filed off to fit a shoe that is too small. Most horses work better with plenty of foot t...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1904

12 The Field and Garden IRRIGATION IN THE YAKIMA. During the past summer the gov ernment had its irrigation engineers investigating the Yakima Valley, and in his report to the chief of the re clamation service T. A. Noble, en gineer in charge of irrigation invest igation in this state, says: "The fact that private capital has heretofore largely developed the lands of the Yakima Valley by private canals has tended so far to prevent any ex tended examination in that valley by the government engineers. While re quests have been made for examina tions along the Yakima River, the fact that most of the lands of this val ley are now in private ownership makes the interposition of the govern ment a delicate matter. On the one hand, people are asking that no inter ference be had with private develop ment, and on the other are citizens de manding that the government should supplement the existing systems. "There are four tracts in the Yaki ma Valley that might be reclaimed by the government; ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1904

. ■ Simplest and Most Perfect Made. Before you give your order for a Disk Plow be sure to Examine the Sanders For sale by THE OLD RELIABLE HOUSE OF Mitchell, Lewis &Stayer Co. PORTLAND, OREGON. Spokane Seattle Boise Salem Medford Send for Special Circular. /^% Triple Daily Train Service l^( I Between \^s^V Puget Sound Points and St. Paul, Minneapolis And All Points East. The "North Coast Limited." The most perfectly appointed trains on the Continent. Special Homeseekers' rates via the Northern Pacific up to Nov. 30th. $25 from St. Paul. $35 from Chicago. Pullman and Tourist Cars. Dining and Observation Cars on every train. For rates, tickets and all information call on or write to I. A. NADEAU, A. D. CHARLTON, Genl. Agent, Seattle, Wn... A. G. P. A., Portland, Ore. CHICKS RIGHT this year, and the right way to start them is to feed HOLLY CHICK FEED. If you want to know what this has done for others send for our Catalog of Poultry Supplies. It is chuck full of things interesting t...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1904

14 Livestock Industry Livestock Men at Portland. The city of Portland two weeks ago entertained the members of three dif ferent associations at the same time — the National Livestock Association, the National Woolgrowers' Association and the Northwest Horticultural Asso ciation. The last named is given at tention by our horticultural editor, who was present at the meetings. The other two buried their animosities and came together in a most friendly man ner, which resulted in great harmony marking the proceedings, and a better understanding between the two as sociations was one of the happy conse quences. Men from every state where livestock is raised were present and lent their aid and advice in an effort to advance the interests of all inter ested in stockraising. The addresses were all able and far-reaching. One of the most important pieces of work undertaken was the proposi tion to establish an independent pack ing plant in each of the large stock centers where the so-called meat...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1904

'"¥"' PURE BRED NORTH DEVON CATTLE Bred by i| L. V. McWHORTER & SONS, North Yaklma, - - - - - Washington Young Stock For Sale. Satisfaction Guar anteed. Correspondence Solicited. Springbrook farm R. F. D. No. 1. Salem, Ore., 5 m. west, on Salem-Dallas Road. THOMAS W. BRUNK, Propr. Cotswold Sheep, Poland China Swine, Angora Goats Barred P. R. Chickens. A Mountainview Ranch \4££tor- Registered Jersey Cattle jdCBB W9 the greatest milk and but- WmmmS^^mSf ter producers In the world. WL Bead of herd is Royal of IKW. Spokane, son of Koyal Oi 8188 Bellvedere. ■HHBP Fechter & Janeck . North Yakima, : Wash. MeadowbrookStock Farm Breeder of Registered Shorthorn Cat tle and Poland China Hogs. A few bags for sale. / B. T. BYRNS, - - rioscow, Idaho GRANDVIEW FARM We are now offering 20 good registered Oxford Down Rama. The splendid Berk shire Boar Plumper, winner of second prize in the under six months class at Toronto. Two extra good Jersey cows. SHANNON BROS., Cloverdale, B. C Pure Bre...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1904

16 tDid You Hear About the Contest At Fairmount, Minn.? ■ How the Tubular won the same, at the hands of a committee of Minnesota's Dairymen, at their annual convention held at Fairmount, last month, leaving only two-fifths of the amount of fat left by the U. S. Separator, two-sevenths of the fat left in the skim milk by the De Laval, and one-ninth of that left by the Empire. Remember, also, that the Tubular is also by far the most convenient separator made. Its bowl can be cleansed in a couple of minutes, an operation taking from ten to fifteen minutes with other bowls j fit ed with inside devices. It takes 20 per cent less power to operate than any other, 50 per cent less than some. It is the only separator fitted with a low-down supply can. THE TUBULAR. • AGENCY FOR STURGES PASTEURIZER, BOYD CREAM RIPENER, STAR MILK COOLER, RICE BOTTLE FILLER, TURBINE BOTTLE WASHER, CHILD BOTTLE FILLER, EMPIRE MILK BOTTLES, HEALTH BOTTLE CAPS, MILK DELIVERY CANS, CHEESEMAKERS' SUPPLIES. HANSEN'S D...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1904

THE RANCH . VOL. XXL NO. 4. SEATTLE, WASHINGTON, FEBRUARY 15, 1904. B. F. REED, PKESJDKNT STATK DAIKYMKN'S ASSOCIATION. Subscription 50c. per Year.

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1904

2 School of Experience This department Is by and for the sub scribers of The Ranch. Contributions of not over 300 wards are asked of all who have anything valuable and of practical utility to relate. No definite subject Is named, but it is desired that what Is written for this de partment be pertinent to farming conditions in the Northwest. All are at liberty to write and no restriction is placed on the number of articles you send in. For each accepted article credit will be given on our books for 30 cents, to be taken out in either subscription or advertising. Write on one side of the paper only, and always give your full name and address, though not neces sarily for publication if not desired by the correspondent. Corn in Washington—ln looking over the advertisements in The Ranch I am unable to find any for Poland China hogs near home. Surely there are breeders in King county, and how is one to know them unless they ad vertise in The Ranch? We need a Poland China hog, for we want ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1904

THE RANCH With which Is consolidated Th( Washington Farmer, The Pacific Coast Dairyman, The Farmer and Dairyman, The Farmer and Turfman. Issued Ist and loth of each month. PHIL. L. AXLING, Bditob Associate Editors: F. Walden. H. L. Blanchakd. MILLER FREEMAN - - PUBLISHER Editorial Offices: Seattle, Wash. Tel. Main 1265 —Long Distance Connection. BUSINESS OFFICES: Seattle, - - Third Floor Downs Building. Spokane, Alexander & Co., 521 First Aye. Subscription (in advance), one year, 50 cts.; six months, 30 cts. If on time, sub scription will be one dollar. Seattle sub scribers are required to pay $1 per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted in every town to solicit subscriptions. Good commission and sala ries paid. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be notified in writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot find It ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1904

4 Horticultural Notes By F. WALDEN. , W. M. Scott, of Kiona, under date of January 22, writes me as follows: "I have read with much Interest and profit your article on spraying in the last Ranch, and it raises in my mind two questions, viz: 1. What kind of tank is best for a small plant in which to boil the lime and sulphur? Would a tin or copper wash-boiler answer, or would such be corroded? Would it injure a porcelain-lined fruit-cooking pan? How would a galvanized iron tank answer? 2. Approximately, how much of this spray will be needed for 100 trees, the trees being, say, ten years old and running 12 to 16 or 20 feet high? "I am already under obligation to you for valued counsel, and I do not. want to "ride a free horse to death," but I have heard others discussing the kind of tank deeded, though no one about here seems to know what is proper." * * • In answer to friend Scott's inquiries, I would say that he can boil his sul phur and lime in any of the vessels named. We have two...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1904

dent. L. C. Monroe, of Spokane, is continued as secretary. Mr. Monroe is a very competent man, but it would have been a better arrangement to have chosen the secretary from Wenat chee also. * • * A notable event in the fruit-growing industry in Washington was the meet ing of the country fruit inspectors at Pullman January 27-30. This was the first meeting of the fruit inspectors under the new law. This feature of the law is a good one. Our state agricultural college is the source of information on which we who are practicing horticulture must rely. We have not the time nor the facilities for carrying on many of the experi ments that are necessary to the suc cessful carrying out of practical horti culture. In order to do things right we must in many cases know why we do them. For the fruit inspectors to come In contact with the men who are giving all their time to studying insect pests and fungous diseases will most certainly be a great benefit to them in the practical application of...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1904

6 .-. Dairying in .*. j Central Washington^ Mr. President, Ladies and Gentle men: The topic assigned me is, "Dairy ing in Central Washington." Perhaps a more appropriate title would be, "Dairying in Wonderland." It is 22 years since I first saw the Yakima val ley. A few large-hearted pioneers had settled along the streams. Their lit tle patches of grass, grain and veget ables showed the fertility of the soil and were prophetic of the future pros perity of the country. Aside from the streams, stretching nway to the foot hills, was a sage desert. The desola tion of ages was upon it. Its stillness was oppressive. To think of making a home upon it seemed like banishment from society. It was 150 miles to the nearest railroad station over a rough, mountainous road. The isolation of such a life can hardly be realized by persons now coming into the valley. Then we had mail twice a week by stage from The Dalles. Now we have six transcontinental trains rushing through the valley daily. Then f...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1904

ies, making probably 650,000 pounds of butter, which is somewhat higher than the figures given Dy our state dairy commissioner; but the secre tary gave no figures for the cheese re ported by the commissioner which, if added to the actual amount, would agree closely with the commissioner's report. Mrs. Carmichael also reports herds averaging 340 pounds of butter per cow, which shows that the good cows are not all in one locality. In fact, among dairymen on adjoining farms one will be milking the $30 per year cow, while the other has the $85 or better kind of cow. Now, if the dairyman with the $85 cow milks 12 cows, he will receive $1,020 for butter, while his neighbor with the $30 cow will have to milk 34 to be entitled to receive the same amount of money. Is it any wonder he is tired and says: "Dairying don't pay?" Is it any won der that he is so busy nustling for feed for his poor cows that he has no time to read dairy literature? As to the future possibilities of dairying in Centr...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1904

8 OUR DAIRY HERD Its Evolution _ BY H. L. HLANCHARD. - In the last number of The Ranch we said we would give the plan under which we secured and manage our dairy herd. At the outset, in our experience as a dairyman, we made a few fatal mis takes, prominent among which was that altogether too common error of misunderstanding as to the importance the character of the cow bears to final success in the business. We naturally admired anything of the cow kind that would produce milk containing butter fat. We remember it was with no little pride that we hitched Dolly on the buggy and drove to market with the two first churnings of butter that had been made up into two-pound rolls, wrapped in cloth, and placed in a ten-quart pail. This we exchanged for a few needed groceries, such as the groeeryman saw fit to allow us. The cows at this time were on flush pas ture. There was no apparent feed bill to pay for then. Later in the season, as the flushness and succulence of the pasture became mate...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1904

WALKS AND TALKS ON WESTERN AVENUE. BY F. WALDEN. These "Walks and Talks" may not appear regularly, but when occasion seems to demand it they will appeaT. They may be somewhat like the old classification of verbs —"regular, irreg ular and defective," and especially the last. * * * The business done on Western Ave nue in Seattle is immense. If a strang er wants to see a busy part of this city, let him go to this avenue on a fair day and he will hear things hum. The aggregate of business done by the commission men on this thoroughfare I have no means of knowing, but it runs up into the millions of dollars. John W. Godwin once told the writer that the business of their house reached $48,000 in one month. It is claimed that the business of this house aggregates nearly a half million dol lars in one year. It will surprise some people to see what is for sale along Western Avenue. It is now what is called "the dead of winter," and yet, in passing there a day or two since, I saw for sale gre...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1904

10 Poultry Interests Remember that comfort and intelli gent care will make any vigorous flock of hens pay, and pay well. The hen that is housed out and fed properly and does not lay an egg as often as every other day at least is generally either lousy and excessively fat or lacking in vigor, or both. To reduce the condition of the fat hen, feed sparingly of bulky but not fattening food, such as cut grass or clover and roots (all they will eat) and lightly of oats and wheat mixed; no corn, plenty of grit, shells and fresh water. If the hens' roosting room receives an application of whitewash once in six months and the under side of her perch is painted with carbolinium, the hens will not be troubled with lice, especially if the droppings be removed every week. The most effectual way of getting the necessary vigor into the flock is by the introduction of new blood. A good way to do this is to place with them a mature and vigorous purely bred cockerel. The next crop of layers will show...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1904

Few Birds Are Perfect. (Chas. E. Cram.) Many men have been attracted to the poultry industry by the apparently high prices received for eggs and fancy fowls. They hear of eggs being sold at from $2 to $5 per setting, and single birds all the way from $2 up to $50, and even higher. They do not realize the difficulty of breeding and raising birds to sell at these high prices, and think it .is nearly all profit. Those who go into it thinking it is all profit often go out of it thinking there is no profit. They are wrong in both cases. These are the men who buy a set ting or two of eggs and possibly think they have been cheated if they do not get several high-class birds. Some of them think every bird should be a show bird, where with some varieties he would be repaid if he got even one bird fit for the show room from one setting of eggs. Sometimes the high prices are not paid entirely for the value of the bird, but partly for the bird's show record. These, probably, are worth all they ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1904

a The Field and Garden Inoculation for Legumious Plants. The following communication has been received from Byron Hunter, as sistant agrostologist of the department of agriculture: "Through your valuable paper we desire to call the attention of those interested in growing legumes to the fact that the U. S. department of agriculture will distribute, during the spring of 1894 only, nitrogen-fixing or ganisms for common legumes, such as peas, clover, alfalfa, vetch, etc. As a general rule, the quantity sent to each applicant will be sufficient to in oculate a little more than a bushel of seed for which the material is de sired. If the applicant desires to in oculate a larger quantity of seed, in formation will be furnished that will enable him to grow the material for himself. Full directions accompany each package. "To secure this material it is neces sary to apply to Dr. A. P. Woods, Bu reau of Plant Industry, Washington, D. C, stating what legumes you expect to grow, the amount of s...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
x
Loading...
x
x