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Elephind.com contains 116,947 items from Recorder, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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L/ rF.ST VENTS AT ASHINGTON [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 18 February 1921

L/ r F.ST VENTS \ AT ASHINGTON ■Aiy? sf ate part, ! the Indian Approprl||||;Bp r O' o'!I ca •• ing about $13,000,000, "iird cf e sixteen regular ap•r' 'Ration ,n. to get through senate. V ith the Indian bill out t e way, the senate hustled the hH|265.500,000 annual Pension bill through in two rrinutes. The Naval Apr) bpriaPon bill was taken up, and ■ it hoped that this also will be I quic !y disposed of. | The h, ..se passed the first of the nnual deficiency appropriation bills, carrying approximately $203,000,000, and the eleventh supply bill to be sent to the senate. It is sserted that the United States shot d maintain a navy equal at least to that of any other nation; bthat the capital ship is not obsolete, and that since universal disarmament 1 has not been established, it would be wrong for the United States to disarm, is the substance of « report by the Senate Commits'® tee cn Naval Affairs. Bwith cne r-tore bill to be approved by the House Committee on Appropriathe cost of ru...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
K -r ;n Australia, [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 18 February 1921

K -r ; n Australia, H __ Australia are paid by H| oi sin t■; > rhey_ shear, but H helper .1 re paid by the H raging everything, from ■ ers, which are hard, to old ■ t are easy, a good man will I 90 to 100 sheep a day. ■ )(■ i' record is 327 sheep shorn i,i shearer in nine hours, i Hi ’ - •■«*<•<»r<l< have been made. was probably years back the fleeces were : :u - ; ‘-"i nine -pound, as they are to-

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
MEN OF IMMORTAL* MEMORY Many of the Work# of the Greek Philosophers, Plato and Aristotle, Are Still Preserved. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 18 February 1921

MEN OF IMMORTAL* MEMORY Many of the Work# of the Greek Philosophers, Plato and Aristotle, Are Still Preserved. Plato (427-347 B. C.), the celebrated jßreek philosopher, taught that the true source of knowledge is the reason, observes an exchange. According to his teaching, we come to consciousness through innate ideas developed by contact with the outer world through senses. He distinguished between empirical knowledge and reason, and divided philosophy into logic, metaphysics and morals. He was the first to attempt the construction of philosophic language; to develop an abstract idea of knowledge and science; to state logically the properties of matter, form, substance, accident, cause and effect, reality and appearance; to describe the divinity as a being essentially good, and tell of his moral attributes. He taught that matter is an eternal and infinite principle; that God is the supreme intelligence, incorporeal, without beginning, end or change, and that the soul of man is immo...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
CATFISH CLIMB SMOOTH WALL Certain Species Equipped With a P* culiar Suction Apparatus That Makes Feat Really Easy. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 18 February 1921

CATFISH CLIMB SMOOTH WALL Certain Species Equipped With a P* culiar Suction Apparatus That Makes Feat Really Easy. An interesting account of the climbing catfish of Colombia (Arges marmoratus) was published a few years ago by R. D. O. Johnson. These fish can climb, by means of suction apparatus, not only up the steeply-in-clined bed of mountain torrent, but even up a smooth, vertical surface. Mr. Johnson saw some of them climb a vertical distance of 18 feet in half an hour, up a wall of rock over which trickled a thin film of water. In connection with a recent publication of this article, G. K. Noble states that other species of fish are known to climb in the same manner. Several of these occur in the Himalaya. Nemachilus rupicola, and perhaps other species of mountain cyprinids, adhere to the rocks by means of their smooth ventral skin and enlarged lips. The silurid genera Pseudecheneis and Glyptosternum cling by means of a well-developed abdominal, sucker. The mountain torrents of...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
How It Looks to One Pair of Eyes. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 18 February 1921

How It Looks to One Pair of Eyes. It is delightful to think how new everything is, spite of description. Never believe . . . that there is an old world. There is no such place, on my honor! You will find England, France, Italy, aud the East, after all you have read and heard, as altogether new as if they were created by your eye, and were never sung, painted, nor bewritten —you will indeed. Why—to be sure —what were the world else? . . . Pen and ink cannot take the gloss off your eyes, nor can any man look through them as you do. I do not believe the simplest matter — sunshine or verdure —has exactly the same look to any two people in the world. How much less a human face —a landscape—a broad kingdom? Travelers are very pleasant people. They tell you what picture was produced in their brain by the things they saw. . . . How it looks to one pair of eyes; would be a good reminder penciled on the margin of many a volume. —N. Parker Willis in Rural Letters.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
“Land of the Mind." [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 18 February 1921

“Land of the Mind." A French author once coined the phrase: “The land of the mind.” It is a realm that many of us have forgotten. There the imagery is real; there death is unknown, and the only riches are men’s thoughts. With every age it grows in splendor. Dickens, Milton, Shakespeare, Hugo—these and countless others have left their all for those who travel there. The demands of existence have blinded some of ns to the joys that lie in such travels. As children we roamed the fields of imagination, but now we believe only in the material Yet we call ourselves wise. The dreary nights of winter are ahead. Why not client them of their dreariness, and on the wings of literature journey to the Land of the Mind? —Portland Oregonian.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Ordered Maypole Cut Down. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 18 February 1921

Ordered Maypole Cut Down. John Endicott was the Puritan who caused a Maypole at Salem, Mass., to be cut down. Sent to Salem by a settlement company, Endicott displayed liis stern opposition to all “vain amusements” by cutting down a Maypole, which had been put up by an earlier ettlement attempted at Cape Ann by Rev. John White, who had been rector of Trinity church, Rochester, England. Endicott named the place Salem, the Hebrew word for “peaceful,” and lectured the people on the folly of amusements. He was a most rigid Puritan in thought and manner. Endicott was commissioned governor of the colony.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
City Has Endowed Flagstaff. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 18 February 1921

City Has Endowed Flagstaff. There is - an endowed staff in the United States, that on the common at Lawrence, Mass. At the time of the Lawrence strike some years ago, when many indignities were shown to the American flag, there was held a flag parade of 40,000 persons, each carrying a,flag as a protest. A publicspirited citizen, Joseph Shattuck, offered to efect a flagstaff and to set aside funds, the interest on which would buy flags for the staff. The j city o J Lawrence accepted the offer, j and today on its common Is one of the * finest in the world. J

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
SCENE OF MAJESTIC BEAUTY Table Mountain, for Many Reason;, if Superior to Any of the Earth's Great Peaks. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 18 February 1921

SCENE OF MAJESTIC BEAUTY Table Mountain, for Many Reason;, if Superior to Any of the Earth's Great Peaks. I have seen many flat-topped kopjes in Africa. I have seen the bare and golden Atlas range drop away into the golden sands of Mogudor, but I have never seen anything resembling its mighty mass which is the dominant, the royal fact of the Cape Peninsula. . . . It is by virtue of its mass and the colossal buttressed cliffs which form its walls that Table mountain is majestic, as also by the abruptness of its rise from the visible sea-level. The height of inland mountains is a matter of faith rather than sight; but this mountain, like Etna and the Peak of Teueriffe and others whose roots are in the sea, announces its stature at once to the eye. It rises more immediately from the sea than either of these, yet not so immediately as it appears to do when seen from the bay. It throws out toward the ocean low spurs of mingled rock and green banks. In spring these grassy banks are all se...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
NEED FOR BALANCE WHEEL Courage Is, of Course, a Magnificent Thing, But Should Be Regulated by Prudence. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 18 February 1921

NEED FOR BALANCE WHEEL Courage Is, of Course, a Magnificent Thing, But Should Be Regulated by Prudence. Courage is an indispensable quality in our success; but if it is not balanced and regulated by prudence it will run away with us and lead us into all sorts of foolhardy things. Boldness is a great quality when it is held in check by proper cautiousness and guided by good judgment. I know a man whose courage is very much over-developed and his faculty of caution is very deficient. He does not know what fear means, and he plunges into all sorts of foolish operations which do not turn out well, and he is always trying to get out of things which he had gone into hastily. If his prudence had been equally developed with his courage, with his boldness, he would have made a very strong man. Futile endeavors, half-hearted efforts never accomplish anything. It takes the fire of determination, energy, push, and good judgment to accomplish that which counts. It is the well-balanced enthusiast...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
The Kiss in Ancient Folklore. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 18 February 1921

The Kiss in Ancient Folklore. A story of Alexander the Great and a kiss forms one of the most thrilling bits of history. An enemy of the king’s invented a novel plot to cause Alexander's death. He discovered a beautiful young girl, who, like Rappacinl’s daughter in Hawthorne’s story, had been brought up on deadly poison, and every one who came near her was killed by her deadly atmosphere. She was sent to the king’s palace with instructions to do what would be called “vamping” today. Alexander saw and admired her extravagantly, but the shrewd Aristotle suspected treachery. Before he allowed the girl to approach the throne he sent for a criminal who had been sentenced to death, and instructed him to kiss the girl in the presence of the king. He fell dead on the ground, like one struck by lightning. The same story appears in folklore of India, and the early Christian monks made great use of it in their sermons, personifying the Christian as Alexander, conscience as Aristotle, sin as th...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Disagree Over Famous Vine. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 18 February 1921

Disagree Over Famous Vine. On Roanoke island, off the North Carolina coast, stands au autf.ent Scuppernong vine. It Is near the grave of Virginia Dare and the sit* of the “Lost Colony.” Nobody knows the age of that vine, but many newby vines, which seem more youthfed by comparison, actually are known to be more than one hundred years o’.d. A regional contribution to .a.nierican mythology credits Sir WaHer Raleigh with having planted the vine where it now stands, and further claims are that it Is the original Scuppernong. Unimaginative investigators, however, say that the original Scuppernong grew wild In Tyrrell county. North Carolina, along the Bcuppernong river, well before 1760, and that from this county the species ftmnd its way to Roanoke island.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Shoe-Throwing Old Custom. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 18 February 1921

Shoe-Throwing Old Custom. Throwing old shoes was not always confined to weddings, though the custom nowadays has come to De associated entirely with the going away of bridal couples. Authorities differ as to the origin of the practice and its exact significance; it seems, however, as if it had to do with the Ifansfer of property —women being regarded as such among the nations in which the custom began. It was in the sense of continuing a sale or exchange that the Jews understood the removal and giving of a shoe or sandal. - When the kinsman of Boa? consented to waive his claim upon the parcel of land which Naomi would sell, he “drew off his shoe,” for this is the custom of Israel.”

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Private Sale of Blacksmith Tools [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 18 February 1921

Private Sale of Blacksmith Tools Consisting of blower, anvil, bonder, shrinker, vise tongs, wrenches, drill mandrill and alot of thngs not mentioned. Everything will be sold for cash. The tools will be sold as a whole or separately. All who owe me please call and settle between now and Feb. 15 as I am going to sell for cash or produce from now on. Sugar $lO,OO per hundred lb. cash. ■B.e. : ' __

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
FAMED FOR GIANT POTATOES District Just North of Denver Has Eft* tablished Its Reputation for the Succulent Vegetable. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 18 February 1921

FAMED FOR GIANT POTATOES District Just North of Denver Has Eft* tablished Its Reputation for the Succulent Vegetable. When Horace Greedy gave the young men of America a loose foot by saying, some decades ago: “Go West, young man,” he incidentally succeeded in getting a very tine brand of potatoes named for himself, writes William G. Shepherd in the Saturday Evening Post. A group of men who went to the West at that time settled In a district north of Denver and east of the Rocky mountains, and perhaps, because they thought of nothing else to raise, they planted potatoes. About them, in the highlands, the only wild potatoes in the United States were growing luxuriantly. This district Is similar climatically and otherwise to the highland district in Chile, where explorers are believed to have come across the potato for the first time. These Colorado wild potatoes propagated themselves by means of seeds, and it is from the pods of these seeds that the Colorado potato experts get the mat...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
“SIMON PURE” A STAGE HERO Name of Hero of Popular Comedy Ha» Become Synonymous for the Genuine Article. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 18 February 1921

“SIMON PURE” A STAGE HERO Name of Hero of Popular Comedy Ha» Become Synonymous for the Genuine Article. The expression, “Simon Pure,’’ meaning “the real man,” had its origin In the name of a Pennsylvania Quaker in Mrs. Centlivre’s comedy, “A Bold Stroke for a Wife.” Being about to visit London to attend the quarterly meeting of his sect, Aminadab Holdfast sends a letter of recommendation and introduction by his friend, Simon Pure, to another Quaker, who is guardian of Anne Lovely, a young lady reputed to have a fortune of £30,000. Colonel Felgnwell, another character in the same play, being enamored of Miss Lovely and her fortune, avails himself of an accidental discover of the letter of introduction and succeeds in passing himself off as Simon Pure. But virtue is triumphant in the end. Simon Pure appears with his witnesses and the scoundrelly Felgnwell is exposed. The play scored a great success, and the name of “Simon Pure” was gradually applied to anything which was genuine and a...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Twilight Varies With Latitude [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 18 February 1921

Twilight Varies With Latitude Twilight is the diffused illumination of the sky which immediately precedes sunrise and follows sunset. When the sun sets below’ the horizon w T e are not at once plunged into total darkness. There is an intermediate period of partial and slowly increasing darkness. That period is twilight. It Is caused by the reflection of the sunlight by dust and particles of w’ater vapor in the upper atmosphere. The same phenomenon occurs just before sunrise, and, to distinguish it from the evening twilight, is called dawn. Dawn begins and twilight ends when the sun is about eighteen degress below’ the horizon, and consequently their duration varies with the latitude and season of the year. The higher the latitude the smaller the angle at which the sun’s path meets the horizon, and hence the longer it takes the sun to sink a distance of eighteen degrees below the horizon. In the tropics twilight rarely is longer than thirty minutes, while in the north of Scotland abo...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Glue Stronger Than Steel. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 18 February 1921

Glue Stronger Than Steel. A new field for wood lias been opened by the use of what is called ply-wood and glue made from the blood of the animals killed at the slaughter house and of the casein, obtained from milk. Remarkable sturdiness under all conditions has been shown by this combination. The combination was first thought of in connection with the manufacture of airplanes. Thin sheets of wood are laid one over the other with dry sheets of paper coated on both sides with the new glue. The mass is then heated under pressure and the result is that a structure is formed which is stronger than steel and has many other advantages over metal. Panels were glued together with these and tested in boiling w’ater for eight hours. At the expiration of this time none of the pieces showed any separation of the plies.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
OFFERS $lOO LOAN TO HENRY FORD [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 18 February 1921

OFFERS $lOO LOAN TO HENRY FORD '■#» G. P Hurbaugh of Columbus Ohio, owns a flivver and he /Ikes It. In fact, he thinks so mich of his machine that he has wired the manufacturer of it —Henry Ford —that ho win loan him $lOO to help tide him over hjl reported fh“. Cia .l difficulties. , Hurbaugh thinks if every Ford owner in the land would do likewise that they could only in a measure repr v (he man who has made the joys motoring possible to thousands who otherwise could

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
MINIATURE mnWs IN CITY Movements of Air Currents, Developed by. High Buildings, Make Study That is Interesting. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 18 February 1921

MINIATURE mnWs IN CITY Movements of Air Currents, Developed by. High Buildings, Make Study That is Interesting. You may learn many Interesting things about air currents and the way storms develop by watching the movement of pieces of paper, or perhaps your hat, as It is whirled about the street. A variety of miniature windstorms are developed by the high buildings of our cities or the forms of streets, which will repay careful study. On a hot day even, when the air is perfectly quiet, the atmosphere, as it becomes heated tends to rise against the sides of rocks or buildings, and If It travels far enough will develop in a strong wind, which descends on the opposite side and plays queer pranks. A small whirlwind is often produced by the action of wind against a corner formed by several buildings. As the wind travels down a street, especially a narrow one, it rapidly Increases in velocity. A little will spill into the side streets, but the main stream will flow on, gathering momentum. ...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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