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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1985

Genealogy My grandfather DeLancey was from up near - Floyd. Also some Webb are related. I would like to know where the mouth of Pigg River is located. My grandfather grew up near there and I would like to visit there. I now live only a few miles from the Pigg River in Pittsylvania Co. near Smith Mountain Lake. Thank you, I would greatly appreciate it. Mrs. Bud Speck Rt.l, Box 143 Penhook, VA 24137 I would appreciate any information on the children of John Heath Trent born in Washington County, Va; Martha A. Trent m. James Callahan; L.Van Trent; Elizabeth Trent m. Jeff D. Heath; Rachel Fanny Trent m. R.C. Kidd. I cannot find any other information from there. Thank you for your assistance, Nancy T. Carswell 1524 Brookford Rd. Kernersville, NC 2728k Subscribe Today To The Mountain Laurel A Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life 1 Year (12 Issues) Only 5 6.00 Send A Gift! or 2 Year (24 Issues) Only SIO.OO Tell us the occasion (Happy Birthday, Anniversary, Get Well Soon, Thinking Of You) and w...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1985

PAGE 14 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MARCH, 1985 OUT AND ABOUT IN THE MOUNTAINS Q: Since there are less insects and other natural foods in colder months, what do some of our resident birds eat in Winter and early Spring? Also, what food can I put in the Bird-Feeder to attract certain kinds of birds. A: It is true that food is scarcer for our feathered friends during winter, but particularly late winter and early spring. Up to then, there are still wild poke berries, grapes, honeysuckle, berries and lots of seeds. There are so many birds in the Blue Ridge Mountain area that I can't begin to discuss them all at this time. Following are a few of the most common ones you are likely to see at your feeder. These will be all year-round residents. We also have many winter visitors from the North. THE CAROLINA WREN This is one of my favorites. It is very friendly. Its warmweather diet was soft, juicy caterpillars. During the winter they seek the berries of poke and honeysuckle, ants and hibernating spide...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1985

ForSa,e The Perfect Location SINCE THE BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY WAS BUILT IN THE 1930'S FOLKS HAVE BEEN VISITING MEADOWS OF DAN, VIRGINIA IN STEADILY INCREASING NUMBERS EACH YEAR. DUE TO THE STRATEGIC LOCATION OF THIS AREA IN THE EXACT NORTH TO SOUTH CENTER OF THE BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY/SKYLINE DRIVE, IT HAS BECOME A FAVORITE STOPPING OFF POINT FOR VISITORS TO THE BLUE RIDGE. TODAY, WITH THE NUMBER OF VISITORS TO MEADOWS OF DAN FAR IN EXCESS OF 1/000,000 ANNUALLY, THERE IS A SHORTAGE OF OVERNIGHT ACCOMODATIONS. CURRENTLY, WITHIN A 15 MILE RADIUS OF MEADOWS OF DAN, THERE ARE LESS THAN TWENTY MOTEL UNITS AVAILABLE. THERE IS DEFINITELY A NEED FOR MORE ACCOMODATIONS AND OUR AREA, LIKE MOST RURAL AREAS, COULD USE THE ADDITIONAL JOBS THAT A QUALITY LODGE WOULD CREATE HERE. WE'RE LOOKING FOR SOMEONE TO PROVIDE A LODGE OR OTHER QUALITY OVERNIGHT ACCOMODATIONS TO OUR AREA VISITORS. IF YOU'RE LOOKING FOR A SOUND INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY, PLEASE CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING FACTS: PARKWAY OVERNIGHT ATTRACTION M...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1985

PAGE 16 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MARCH, 1985 A WINTER DAY IN THE BLUE RIDGE Bird Feeder a / PLAstic. If j \ eov^ HOLE HOLE I=l'-'---'-iy 1 The first week in January brought a touch of winter to the mountains of the Blue Ridge in the form of an ice storm. Along with it came broken trees and power lines. In spite of the hardships, I believe it was one of the most beautiful sights I have ever seen. You probably are thinking, "How in the world can she think all that mess is beautiful?" I just couldn't get very much work done on this day. There I was carying in firewood for my woodstove and enjoying every minute of it. All day I admired the beauty of the ice storm. The trees wore sparkling coats of ice, some as much as two inches thick. The sunlight made diamonds seem to appear dancing in the ice. Even the lowly briar was transformed into a thing of beauty. Stately pines wore an armor of ice. I went onto my deck and stood amazed. This was a restful day and I took time to enjoy it. With the storm ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1985

FROM THE JOHN HAYES HOLLOW: I remember Mama when the winters were long and cold Christmas was over and we had finished the few oranges and stick candy that had been a greater part of our gifts. We were now in the beginning of the New Year, with a few months of hard cold winter weather facing us before spring. About this time of year the canned food that had been stored in the basement was running low, the potatoes that had been banked away under straw and dirt out back were getting hard to find. The corn in the crib was down to a few bushels of nubbins. The ham in the smoke house was nothing but a well stripped bone and the cold weather had caused the chickens to £top laying In a few weeks the cow would be dry in preparation for her calf that would be born in the spring. There wasn't much meal or flour left in the old meal chest either. To the eyes of a stranger there would have been no doubt that we were a welfare case. But not us, for Mama always had a plan. Mama taught us many th...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1985

PAGE 18 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MARCH, 1985 Recently a movement has been underway by a small group to rename a North Carolina town Mayberry, in honor of the Mayberry made famous by the popular Andy Griffith TV program. While no one, including Mr. Griffith, can remember how the name was chosen for the imaginary city of TV fame, we have always heard locally that it came from Mayberry, Virginia . Mayberry is located approximately the same distance from Mount Airy (Mr. Griffith's home town) as Pilot Mountain (known as Mount Pilot in the TV show) and it is said that his grandfather used to trade at the Mayberry Store (now Mayberry Trading Post). We hold fast to the belief that the Mayberry of TV fame was based, however loosly, on Mount Airy and names were borrowed from surrounding communities such as Pilot Mountain, North Carolina and Mayberry, Virginia. With this in mind, we asked Miss Addie Wood, the 84 year old proprietor of Mayberry Trading Post and lifelong resident of Mayberry to tell us a...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1985

MY HANKIE DOLL © COPYRIGHT 1985 |JY ; Laverne Sutton Sitting in church on a Sundaymorning, my mother would take out a white hankie and roll two sides to the middle. Then she would fold the rolled hankie in half. Holding the rolls towards the middle, the back half of the hankie was then brought forward around two fingers. One side of the roll was inserted through the middle. Both ends were then pulled downward to make legs*. Turning the hankie upside down in her hand, she inserted one roll of the other end of the hankie through the middle and pulled out. This made the arms. Her wedding band over the top of the hankie formed the head. This hankie babykept this Very young child quiet while her mother enjoyed the service. r-WV-^ j-yfLoOG* } J net* Fa/J *f> posH W W^/Je FINISHED DOLL Back view Front view jjp —V / V/>® f(T3 service. MOUNTAIN RECIPE BUTTERMILK PIE 3 eggs 2 cups sugar 1 tablespoon flour 2/3 cup buttermilk 1/4 cup melted butter 1/3 teaspoon salt 1 teasp...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1985

Page 20 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MARCH, 1985 EXPLORING THE MYSTERY FORTS Tumbledown stone walls stretch across some of the highest peaks of the Southern Appalachians, often nearly inaccessable except for a steep trail, always running from east to west, the remnant of structures it must have taken tremendous effort to build. Who built them? When? Why? No one knows for sure. Even looking at the map points up a mystery. Start from a 20 foot high stone mound at Waleska, Georgia and draw a line due north to Berea, Kentucky. Three and one half degrees west of the line, you'll find Fort Mountain not far from Chattsworth, Georgia, while near Berea you'll find another fort about half a degree east of due north starting from Waleska. Such a relatively straight compass line caused a good deal of speculation, but no one knows if it was deliberately measured or the result of coincidence. Look at the map again and starting from Fort Mountain, move east to Montone, Alabama. Here the most damaged of the sou...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1985

THE MYSTERY FORTS Continued from page 20. have used the area for ceremonial purposes. After all, the walls simply weren't high enough (5 feet) to serve for defense, they block one side of the mountain and the nearest spring is almost a quarter of a mile away. De Soto Falls offers no such problem. A wall across the cliff very effectively cuts off any possible entrance, and the narrow path which leads down the bluff to the caves could be defended for a long time with very little effort. However, by the time the state of Alabama claimed the land, local residents had torn down the walls and used most of the stones to build their own houses. Old Stone Fort in Tennessee suffered no such fate; the Tennessee Department of Conservation moved to have the area made into a state park before anyone could destroy it. All the stone walls, some 20 feet high remain standing. Despite such weighty evidence, who built the walls remains a mystery and has since the time of the early explorers. The pionee...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1985

PAGE 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MARCH, 198 ? 5 FREE INFORMATION TO SEND FOR If you are planning a visit to the Blue Ridge, here are a few addresses where you can write for free information that would be helpful to you and make your trip more enjoyable. Division of Travel & Tourism c/o Hope Tyndall 430 N. Salisbury Street Raleigh, NC 27611 Or call: 1-SOO-VISIT NC (toll free). Division of Tourism c/o Martha Steger 202 N. 9th St., Suite 500 Richmond, VA 23219 Or call: 804-786-4434 The High Country Host Association of Western North Carolina offers a free packet of information about accomodations and attractions in the Blue Ridge. You may call toll free in North Carolina to 800-222-7515 or elsewhere in the Eastern United States, toll free to SOO-438-7500. You can also write: North Carolina High Country Host c/o Boone Area Chamber of Commerce 600 Highway 105 Ext. Boone, NC 28607 Please mention The Mountain Laurel when you call or write. Thank you. BACKROADS (Continued from page 24) th...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1985

BACKROADS Continued from page 22. set on the wide front porch in order to accomodate everyone. Overnight guests are treated to a continental breakfast in the upstairs breakfast nook. The dinner menu offers a French cuisine that has drawn a lot of rave reviews. Those wishing overnight accomodations should call 919-982-2102 for reservations. Reservations are not required, but are recommended since only six rooms are available. Gayle not only operates the Glendale Springs Inn but also the Old Salem Tavern in the historic Old Salem district of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 03.0 Here we turn right on state road 1161 toward the Greenhouse Crafts Shop and the Glendale Springs Inn Bakery. After turning they will be on our left. Gayle also operates the shop and bakery which supplies the fresh baked goodies to the Inn. 03.1 At this point, the Holy Trinity Church of the Fresco is on our right. The entire interior wall behind the pulpit is a beautiful fresco of the Last Supper. It was painted ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1985

COMPLIMENTARY COPY HEART OF THE BLUE RIDGE s r\ouniain *"■"" i Copyright 1984 Laurel Publications Inc. Monthly Journal of Mountain Life A self-guided monthly tour of Mountain Backroads PAGE 24 mountains never get to see the really pretty places that are hidden away on mountain back roads. As residents who love and appreciate a stream gurgling through a glade or a deer standing in a roadside meadow or an old weathered barn tucked away in a mountain hollow, our BACKROAD column allows us to share our favorite spots with you. Viewers of WFMY-TV in Greensboro, North Carolina or the CBS News Show, Sunday Morning with Charles Kuralt have often been treated to the beautiful nature studies of cameraman Jim Waters. His work often focuses on the Blue Ridge and it has been my pleasure to spend a good many days with Jim, riding mountain backroads and often stopping while he captured on film such things as butterflies on daisies or old weathered buildings. Jim is a true lover of nature's beauty a...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

APRIL 1985 Monthly Journal of Mountain Life John Hayes Hollow The one thing that everybody in our part of the world was most afraid of was "mad dogs" (rabies). Once, when I was about 9 or 10, I knew that my Uncle Coy had two dogs, Brownie and Honey and they had been sick. We called it having fits. Uncle Coy had them both tied up, so I was not afraid to pass by his house On my way to school. But, just as I was passing his house, I heard a dog making a strange sound. I looked back and there was Brownie going around in circles, his tail between his legs and foam running from his mouth. Somehow he had gotten loose. That do|; started toward me and I startea to run. I ran just as fast as I could all the way to my grandma Moore's. I stopped there long enough to get my breath and a of water, then hurried on to school after Grandma assured me the dog was not following me. That afternoon, we kids went over the Vern Mountain home instead of by that road. I was afraid to go back by Uncle Coy's....

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

PAGE 2 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1985 EVERETT WON THE MEDAL One of the great educational influences in our earlier schools was the Literary Society and the Debating Society. Sometimes they were one and the same group. Every school having six grades or more had one. Generally Friday afternoon was set aside for these groups to present their programs. When practical, Friday night was the regular time of meeting. Elocution, current events, debating, parlimentary procedures and special theses were parts of the programs. These programs developed character, self confidence and public speaking ability. It is to be regretted that these benefits are no longer a part of our educational and social life styles. They were an important part of school life in Carroll County. Practically all of my uncles participated in them. My mother was awarded a medal in a county competition in elocution. My cousin Everett Kinzer whose home was located at the intersection of what is now US 221 and state road 100, h...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

A CHINQUAPIN DISASTER Did anybody ever tell you about the time I went chinquapin huntin' and lost them in the creek? Well, I know I didn't, and I guess I better not now. If people didn't talk it, maybe I'd better let it lay still! You say you won't tell anybody? Declare to goodness? Well I don't know why I brought it up, but this is what happened. I knew that the chinquapins were openin' a right smart, but I didn't expect to find the whole patch up in our bluff field wide open. I didn't go prepared to pick many, just had two small pockets on my apron and dress, and I got them filled in a few minutes. Then I wondered whether to go back to the house for something to carry them in, but that was a good ways extra to walk. So laziness prevailed! Well, I actually didn't want to leave because somebody else might find them, and chinquapins would be bringin' five cents a pound at least. I had on a pair of full-legged bloomers, and the thought hit me I could use them for pockets well as anyth...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

PAGE 4 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1985 GETTING AWAY WITH MURDER Editor's Note....We don't usually print stories that tell of the worst aspect of human nature - violence. We decided to print the following story because we think that we shouldn't print only the humorous side of bootlegging when it was sometimes deadly serious, as this true story testifies. Mrs. Craig said that everyone involved in the story except her and her brother have passed away. I imagine it still took quite a bit of courage for her to tell it. "I wonder if anyone has ever gotten away with murder in Virginia?" my sister asked. "Not very likely," my brother answered with a quick glance in my direction. We were sitting in my front yard idly chatting. It was a late hazy September afternoon. A soft wind was lazily stirring the red and bronzed leaves. Few birds were singing, but now and then the raucous cry of a crow drifted across the nearby river. I suppose the question was prompted because she was looking through the ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

GETTING AWAY WITH MURDER Continued from page 4. stairs. He saw me waiting. "Go to Grandpa's room and wait. I'm wet and freezing." I went down the hall to the room we kept ready for Grandpa's visits. In a few minutes he entered. He was crying and shaking. "Oh, my god! Have you been caught?" "Hell no, it's a lot worse than that!" "What happened? You didn't go to Crewe!" I accused. "Naw, I wish to God I had." "Justin and I were loading our car at the still when these three guys from West Virginia came in for a load. They were arguing with Sam (the boot-legger) over the price. Sam told them all to get out. He said that he didn't need them anymore. He told them that he could get a lot better deal in Richmond. This real young kid with them, pulled out the biggest knife you ever saw and started towards Sam." Charles paused, trembling all over as though he couldn't go on. "Well," I prompted. "Sam shot him, dead as a door nail!" I caught at the bed post to keep from falling. "Did the sheriff...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

PAGE 6 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1985 WRITER "BUMBLES" WAY THROUGH A NEAR CATASTROPHE Mr. John pulled the horsedrawn rake to a stop just opposite the wind-row of fragrant clover hay I was shocking. He carefully hung the smooth leather lines, used for guiding the horses, over the tilt lever of the rake and, leaning back in the spring cushioned seat, called to me. "Hey Charlie." he said, "come over here a minute. I've got something I bet you'll be interested in." I jammed the sharp tines of the pitch fork into the soft, dark soil and hurried over to join him. Though it was the last thing on my mind at the moment, I was about to play a leading role in one of his favorite pranks. A prank, incidentally, that usually took place in a hay field. And that's exactly where we happened to be. About a dozen of us were busy harvesting one of Mr. John's lush meadows. We were doing this chore in the time honored manner that had prevailed here in these hills for many and many a generation. The first st...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

"BUMBLES" Continued from page 6. to sail out of there. "Hey, Charlie," he yelled at me, "Why don't you check and see if those quail are still in there? Shake the nest a little bit and hold it up to your ear - you 'oughta be able to hear them chirping." I gave the nest a jerk or two and heard the awesome truth. Instead of the chirp of baby quail, the nest started vibrating with the angry buzzing of dozens of bumble bees. Until this moment I had assumed they always nested in burrows in the ground. Now I held the contradiction to this belief in my trembling hands and hadn't the faintest idea of what to do about it. Like the legendary fellow who mounted his horse and rode frantically in all directions, I started running around the hay stacks with even less rhyme or reason. I didn't want to hold onto that nest and still knew better than to let it go. bumble bees, especially the small fuzzy strain, are masters of pursuit and once they set their minds on vengence, somebody is bound to pay....

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1985

PAGE 8 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1985 GOOD HOME COOKIN' I have tried to describe elsewhere my Granddaddy Troy Goodson as owner and sole prop, of Goodson's Cafe on West Grayson Street in Galax, Virginia, from the Depression until the restaurant finally burnt down in 1962. What I wasn't really able to get at was his cooking, and his Christian charity. Somehow they both go together. Granddaddy said he learned how to cook because, as the youngest of five sons in the cabin at the Goodson Settlement at the foot of Fishers Peak, he always had to "holp Moma git dinner for the rest .of them." What made his cooking so good is another matter. For one thing, in my opinion, it was partly because he learned to cook over an open fire, and because he was on a first-name, first-hand familiarity with every ingredient he ever used. But his was "good ole home cookin'." There was nothing at all fancy about it: not a drop of wine in a sauce or a gravy, not a dab of spice beyond salt and pepper (except in hi...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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