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Elephind.com contains 8,145 items from Grenville Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 1 May 1915

For children's backing cough at night, J' Woods' Great Peppermint Cure, Is 6d'1

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Care of the Feet. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 1 May 1915

Care of the Feet. Tight and ill-fitting boots and shoes produce such painful complaints as corns, bunions, enlarged joints, and ingrowing toe-nails. Avoid neat-look ing boots with pointed toes, which cramp the feet like Oriental bandages and become instruments of torture to the wearer. Next to tight boots and shoes, the most potent factors for causing tender feet are badly-fitting socks and stockings; these should al ways be chosen "with as few seams as possible. To keep the feet in good condition, there is nothing better than frequently bathing them with warm water in which has been placed a handful of salt. This is especially ef ficacious for those who suffer from* tired or tender feet.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Smythesdale News. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 1 May 1915

On Monday evening the members of the Fire Brigade entertained three of their members, who are soon to leave for the front. Captain Formby presided, and on behalf of the firemen, extended a cordial welcome to the visitors, and also to the comrades at Broadmeadows. He was pleased and proud to know that the brigade was to be represented by three of the best members. A presenta tion of a safety razor with outfit, was made to Fireman E. Causon (Infantry), C. Willis (Infantry), and Bert Causon (Light Horse.) A framed certificate was also presented to Fireman E. Causon for five years service. Mr P. Dalton was also the recipient of a fruit dish. He has served as secretary of the the brigade for a number of years, and has been a member for SB years. On Wednesday evening tha visiting soldiers, Messrs E. Causon, B. Causon, and Chas. Willis, -were entertained at dinner by Dr. and Mrs Vise, of Smy thesdale, when toasts were proposed and honored. The Dr. and Mrs Vise have taken a keen interest in...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MEDICAL MEMS. Food and Exercise. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 1 May 1915

MEDICAL MEMS. Food and Exercise. A good dinner at night is neceasary for those whose pleasure or work keeps them up very late. But for or dinary folk "^vho dine at six or seven and go to ..bed about ten-thirty, only a light wholesome repast should be taken at the end of the day, when muscles and nerves are more or less exhausted. A "tired stomach is a weak stomach" is a golden rule to re member. Yet tiow often one hears people say. "I have been rushing about ally day and am tired to death; I must have a big meal to make up for it!" You may put the big meal into the stomach, but you cannot make the stomach digest it. A belief lives strong in the minds of the majority of mankind, including persons of weak digestion, that a brisk walk taken be fore a meal gets up an appetite and helps the stomach to digest the food. Now this is exactly what it does not do. Exercise spreads the blood through the body.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Cycling and Motor Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 1 May 1915

1 © Whilst the average motor cycle is very economical in fuel, 100 miles to the gallon of petrol being a common oc currence, it will surprise.most people to -learn that on a ton mileage basis the motor cycle is not so economical as a motor car. Even going so far as the " Tourist Trophy " car race in 1907, we find the winning Rolls-Royce averag ing 40 ton miles to the gallon. Even an efficient motor cycle of to-day, weigh ing 3601bs. does well to cover 100 miles a day on a gallon of petrol—the ton mileage is something less than 17—very poor when contrasted with the figures obtainable from a car. There are various reasons for this, snob as fuel wastage, windage, and road inequalities. Whilst the motor cyclist loses in this respect, his running expenses, tyre upkeep, etc., are so small that cost of motoring. per mile is a long way in his favor. The armoured motor car is playing a bigger part in the war than most people in this part of the world are aware, and even Russia is largely usi...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Scarsdale Races. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 1 May 1915

The annual meeting of the Scarsdale and Smythesdale Race Club took place ' on Monday afternoon at the course situ ated midway between the two townships. There was a good gathering of turfites from Ballarat and the surrounding dis tricts. The course, after the recent rains, was in good going order. The officers were attentive to their duties, the president ("Mr J. Creed) and secre tary (Mr G. Howlett) energetically pro moting all the interests of all matters appertaining the day's onting. The other officers were :—Starter, Mr L. Reitze; judge, Mr T. Foley; pony measurer, Mr L. Nunn; clerk of course, Mr C. Wilson ; handicapper, Mr J. Lyons ; timekeeper, Mr C. Pen der ; committee and stewards, Messrs C. Pender, L. Reitze, W. T. William son, J. Creed, M. M'Carthy, T. M'Ke ogh, C. Wilson, G. Gobson, L. Hewett, P. Roaoh, D. Porter, T. Gleeson, G. Woods, F. Young, H. Japp, W. Abbott, W. Stokoe, T. Sparks, L. Nitnn, A. Nimon, ' J. Mackay, M. Roach, and W. Paton. In the morning sparrow and s...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TOURISTS AT THE FRONT. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 1 May 1915

i TOURISTS AT THE FRONT. At the battle of Rietfontein, early -in the South African War, several , ladies turned up on bicycles. They climbed a hill which gave a view of the scene of operations, but had hard ly arrived at the top when a Boer shell pitched fairly close-to them and sent them scuttling. "Very plucky of them," said the re corder of this incident, "but they were rather in the way." "Rather in the way!" That was far too mild a way of putting it. Be fore the war was six months old, Capetown was full of trippers who had come out from England to "see the fun." Nine-tenths of them were women, and to put it plainly and un gallantly, they were a detestable nui sance. They occupied quarters re quired by officers and sick. They bought up eggs and other delicacies which should have gone to hospitals, they wasted the time of young officers who should have been busy looking after their men. There are some pebple who remem 'ber Lord Kitchener's dramatic clear ance of the Mount Nelson ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Watch Case. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 1 May 1915

A Watch Case. Recently Jones coHided with a spell of hard luck, and in order to make his pork and beans and his appetite meet, he was compelled to pawn his watch. While the watch was yet there, a friend asked him the time of day. "Why, what in the world has be come of your watch?" asked the sur prised. friend, seeing Jones pull out a time-killer of the turnip brand. "Here it is," smiled Jones, extend ing the cheap ticker. "Anything the matter with your optical apparatus?" "Yes; but that's a silver watch," persisted the friend. "The one you used to have had a handsome gold case." "I know it did," was the grinful re joinder of Jones; "but circumstances alter cases."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Difficult Choice. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 1 May 1915

A Difficult Choice. A well-known London magistrate, who has just retired from the bench, has a great repertoire of good stories. His favorite one relates to a case in which, he appeared as counsel. In the course of this case he had to cross-examine the wife of a notorious burglar. "You are the wife of this man?" he asked. "I am," she replied. "You knew he was a burglar when you married him?" he proceeded. "I did," she admitted. "How could you possibly marry such a man?" the magistrate demand ed. "Well, it was like this," the witness explained confidentially. "I was get ting old, and two chaps wanted to marry me. It wasn't easy to choose between 'em, but in the end I. married Bill there. The other chap was a lawyer, same as you, sir!" Perseverance has amazing results. It produces such effects that men have almost agreed that even genius is only the faculty of taking infinite pains.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Well Recommended. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 1 May 1915

Well Recommended. A young country Scotsman and his sweetheart went to Glasgow for a day's outing. After spending the morning looking around the big shops and the centre of the city, the young I man suggested that as it was near one I o'clock they should look out for a 1 suitable eating-house to get something ' to eat. i Having spotted a likely place, they I entered and took their seats at a ■ small table, and when the waitress came for their order the young man asked for a sixpenny meat pie. This was brought in due course, and he started eating it with evident relish. The girl waited a little time wonder ing very much where she came in. At last, in sheer desperation, she said to her companion: — "Is the pie good, Jock?" "Good?" replied Jock. "I should think it is; it's ripping! You should get one."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Why? [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 1 May 1915

Whv? A Scottish minister had accepted an invitation to .talk to the patients of a lunatic asyium. In his address he said he would deal with subjects they could grasp readily. One of. the subjects treated was that of ' ti, mothers who throw their children in to the Ganges, thinking they are ap peasing the wrath of the gods. During his talk about this, the cler gyman noticed one of the audience having his eyes riveted upon him. The man's attitude was so defiant that it annoyed the speaker. After the discourse the minister - went among the patients. He met I the'man with the glaring eyes, took his hand, and said: "I noticed you were particularly in • terested when I spoke about the I mothers throwing their babes into ' the River Ganges." "Ah, yes," replied the lunatic; "I was jist wunnerin' why yer mither didca' throw you in." Hogan was raffling his clock. He was fairly successful in disposing of J tickets in the shop where he worked, » but he ran up against trouble when he ' dropped i...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
II [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 1 May 1915

TT "Any great news, uncle," inquired Cfcrissie at tbe breakfast-table, a& George Pedbay narrowly escaped up setting his cup and gave vent to ("Bless my lieart!" over his "Daily. , Comet." j j "The saffron sweet-pea is here at1 last," came the reply; "and from some-: |where in this district. Listen: 'The 1 dream of sweet-pea enthusiasts seems I to have become an accomplished fact. 1 'We learn that an amateur grower re siding in South-east Downshire has succeeded raising a pea which gives blooms of a deep, pure yellow. Ow ing to the probability of each seed being worth its weight in gold, no blooms will be cut for exhibition this year, but the blossoms are described on reliable authority as marvellously beautiful. The raiser's name, for the present, a secret, is already quite well known in a totally different direction from that of the sweet-pea cult.'" "Don't you wish it had been your good fortune, uncle?" asked Chrissie. "Won't everybody who has ever grown a sweet-pea wish i...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BATTLEFIELD PICTURE. A German Soldier on the Terrors of the War. Fallen Comrades. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 1 May 1915

i BATTLEFIELD PICTURE. A German Soldier on the Terrors of the War." Fallen Comrades. • A German newspaper prints the fol lowing extract from a letter written by a soldier to his mother:— "To-day we had a bed for the first time since we set out, but with the. best will in the world I was unable to sleep, and I had to get up, dress my self, and lie down on the floor. Then 1 slept until the sun began to shine into my face. In the evening our lieu tenant summons me into his room; I then have supper with him, and must tell him my experiences from the fir ing line. I do it with extreme reluc tance, as at once painful thoughts arise in my head when I recall my fallen comrades. "And then all these men whom one has oneself killed in the bloody strife! One involuntarily thinks this—here you have again deprived some mother of her son and some children of their father. During the fight itself one does not think of all that; but in the moments of leisure the faces of those who have fallen become...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Best Dream—and Reality. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 1 May 1915

The Best Dream—and Reality. The ship being wrecked on the coast of a small uninhabited island, the "only two survivors—Pat and Jack —only just managed to save a bottle ' of brandy and a few biscuits in the way of provisions. ; To sustain life, great economy had ' to be exercised, and they decided that whoever had the better dream should become "quartermaster" and take charge of the provisions. After a long black night a new day dawned for the castaways, and each related the story of his dream to the other. Said Jack: "I am sure I had the best dream. I dreamed that a messenger from Hea ven came to me in a beautiful golden ! carriage drawn by six winged horses, and invited me tc enter. I was car- I ried up to Heaven, where I took part at a banquet in the company of hun dreds of angels and " "Begorrah," interrupted Pat, "if I didn't have the same vision. I could clearly see you going up to Heaven and having the time of your life up therfe. 'Bedad,' I thought, 'he's out of his troubles,...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHEN ARCHERS FOUGHT NAPOLEON. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 1 May 1915

WHEN ARCHERS FOUGHT NAPOLEON. We think of the bow and arrow as mediaeval weapons of war, abandoned by the nations of Europe four or five centuries ago; yet it is only 100 years since soldiers fought with bows and arrows in European wars, and that, too, on the fields of southern Belgium, where the present war began. It was in 1813, when all Europe was armed against Napoleon. Every one of the allied nations brought every pos sible resource of men and means to further this end. Among them was Russia. To the war she sent soldiers from the newly-conquered tribes that dwelt upon the Steppes of Asia; Bok harans and Turkomans and Tartars and other half savage peoples. Many of these regiments were armed with bows and arrows. Jomini, the military historian, says that these bowmen held their own against the French in fantry. Their aim, he says, was sur prisingly good, and they could shoot an arrow with effect almost as far as a musket ball was effective—but in those days that was not much more...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE PRESS AND THE WAR. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 1 May 1915

THE PRESS AND THE WAR. Th6re is a widespread impression that newspapers delight in war and that their proprietors would he only Loo pleased if there were a great war every few months. It is thought that wars mean huge sales and large pro fits for journals. Nothing could be farther from the truth. Wars certainly lead-to a large increase of circulation, provided they arouse popular interest; hut larger sales do n t necessarily mean larger profits. The newsvendor makes more money, but not the newspaper proprietor. First of all, there is the increased icost of special correspondents and \ telegrams;' this is out of all propor tion to tne result, as it finally ap pears. Then in a widespread - war there is the general increased cost of production all around—increased cost I of paper and other materials—of which the outside public have no knowledge. Even-more vital is the loss ot ad vertisement revenue, for when a country is engaged in a great war people cut down expenses, and firms which ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MILLIONS SPENT ON HELIGOLAND. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 1 May 1915

MILLIONS SPENT ON HELIGO LAND." Since 1890 Heligoland, the Kaiser's island fortress, has been practically reconstructed, and has had £10,000, 000 spent on her by the astute German war lord. She is fortified against sea and cannon alike with great granite buttresses 16ft. thick and 240ft. high on all sides. Even the fissures in her cliff have been filled up and bound to gether for ever with ferro-concrete— thousands of tons of it. To-day the little, one-time crumbling island is wholly encased with a cemented belt of armor, fortified with modern ord nance. And right here in the open ' sea is the Kaiser's advanced naval base and aero station to-day, with its east coast a forty-eight-fathom road stead which can hold the entire Ger man fleet in safety and 100 miles nearer England than when they are at home. Heligoland's magazines contain mil lions of rounds of every class of am munition. Mines, torpedo, aerial bombs, and submarines are there in abundance. Its huge garrison is heav ily pr...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
OUR NATIONAL SONGS. Love for the Motherland by Britons. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 1 May 1915

OUR NATIONAL SONGS. Love for the Motherland by Britons. One of the Canadian newspaper writers hits upon an interesting dis covery in the matter of national hymns when he remarks, as a sugges tive fact, that Britons are the only people in the world who sing of the home of their race as "the motlier land." The idiom runs through spoken language, too, we believe. It is not only in verse and song that Germany is the fatherland to its voyaging sons, but even in their everyday conversa tion as well, and France is "la patrie" to a Frenchman always. Rome, too, was "patria," so that masculinity of personification is not modern at all. It aifords a text for some pretty senti ment to the Canadian writer that this custom is such as it is, and he dwells lovingly on his theme of motherland and home. But we imagine, says a writer in the "Detroit (Mich.) Free Press," that it is not so much the eter nal feminine that has led up to the habit of speech he discusses as it is the colonising tradition of...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Skipton News. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 1 May 1915

Skipton News. 0 A meeting of the Anglers' Club was held in the Mechanics' Institute, ou Saturday evening. Mr J. E. Whittaker presided, and there were sine members present. It was decided on the motion of Messrs G. Gellie and W. Shaw that a euchre party and d&nce and presentation of prizes be held on May 14th, Wilson's music to be en gaged. An invitation will be extended to Ballarat and Linton Clnbs. On the motion of Messrs W. Shaw and M. Osborne it was resolved that the club's bonus for shags be discontinued during the olose season for fish. It was deci ded to procure 100 yearling trout for re-stocking the creek. The committee of the Sports Club have voted a bonus of £2 to theSkipton Brass Band for its services on Easter Monday. The sum of £1 14s 3d was donated to the local Red Cross Society and a similar amount to the Belgian Relief. The club has a credit balance of £36 6s 7d. The profit on the Easter Monday Sports wa3 £9' 8s 7d, less donation to band. A committee consistin...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CANADA TO BUILD WARSHIPS. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 1 May 1915

CANADA TO BUILD WARSHIPS. Canada is not only supplying Great Britain and our Allies with large quan tities of material, but will also soon be in a position to build warships of every type (says the "Yorkshire Post"). This will result from the ac tivities of British firms which have laid down the plant in the Dominion. The yard at Montreal, belonging to Messrs. Vickers, of Barrow, will short ly be capable of taking vessels up to 1,000ft. in length, and the berths are entirely covered so that work can pro ceed in all weathers. On the opposite side of the river Sir W. G. Armstrong, Whitworth and Co., of Elswick, are erecting works for the manufacture of forgings, shipbuilding sections, cast ings, shaftings, and high-speed tool steel, this enterprise being, it is un derstood, associated with the larger scheme of . making Canada self-sus tained in the construction of warships. At Vancouver Messrs. Yarrow, of Scotstoun, are preparing to build de stroyers and other small naval craft, in wh...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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