ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, T... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 719 items from Australian Children's Newspaper, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
719 results
ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. AU letter» to the Editor "'ill be replied tn as fin- as possible under this heâdinQ. c. G. -"In the Waiting Room'" is very good, but ¡is you say "-!" You start with some unnecessary detail as to what your partner and you had decided to do, which, has no effect on the unravellment of the story. You have crude phrases ljke "little passing re- marks about the weather, etc.," etc. ' Excuse errors as it seems natural for me to make them " is charming. As a whole it is smart and promising and has not reached the W. P. B. ROD. J. -We are glad that you are building a doll's house for your little sister. By and bye we will tell you how to make furniture, and by the time she has her dolls dressed the house will be ready for them. We will send you the price list of tools by letter, as we have made arrangements with a city firm to supply them at almost cost price and carriage. CORNSTALK. -Your letter would have been published except for the reference to the sad accide...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE CHILDREN'S NEWSPAPER [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

THE CHILDREN'S NEWSPAPER Is a news paper written expressly for children. Its main purpose is to supply, in palatable form, the world's news care- fully selected and edited, told in simple language and accompanied by appropriate explanations and references suited for children of both sexes. THE CHILDREN'S NEWSPAPER is calcu- lated to keep lion's and girls up-to-date in their knowledge of important current events--to keep them abreast of current literature-to provide them with enter- taining and instructive reading which will enlarge their minds, widen their sympathies, and interest them in the affairs of the great world around. As time goes on new features will be introduced as oppor- tunity offers, so that it shall embrace all matters which enter into the child's life. All political and religious matter will be excluded, so that parents and teachers of all classes and shades of opinion may place the CHILDREN'S NEWSPAPER in the hands of even the youngest child without misgiving-fully...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A NOTABLE ACHIEVEMENT. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

A NOTABLE ACHIEVEMENT. In our jottings from time to time on . the life-stories of " boys who have risen *' (says the B.O.P. ) we have given many instances of what pluck and steady perseverance have accomplished ; }ret few cases have been much more striking than that of Mr. Preece, the well-known Chief of Telegraphs, just retired from the General Post Office, England. In an article on the achievements of Mr. Preece, the Daily News remarked that, after a life devoted in various capacities to electricity, he has risen to his present eminent position from the humble be- ginning of a clerk at 30s. a week. Pro- bably he is proudest of the active part he took in the creation of the block system on our railways, which is worked entirely by electric signals. He says that a first-class compartment is now the safest place in the world, and furnished some remarkable figures. Who would believe that there are over -20.(Mill needle instruments used in our signal-boxes ? Telephones-16,000? Repeater...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS' SPORTS. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS' SPORTS. To Sydney boys and girls the most in- teresting event of the past month has been the Annual Sports gathering of the P.S.A.A.A., which came off on the Royal Agricultural Society's Grounds, Moore Park, on Friday, loth inst. Ideal spring weather once again favoured the Associ- ation, and the attendance of parents and children numbered fully 80,000, making a record gathering for such an occasion. The Public Schools' Athletic Association was formed nearly twelve years ago, for the purpose of promoting physical edu- cation in the Public Schools of N.S.W., and everyone agrees that it has been eminently successful in carrying out this object. The first Annual Sports gather- ing was held in 1SSS, and it proved very successful. Year by year the meeting has attracted a huger share of interest, until now there are comparatively few children in the metropolitan schools who do not look forward to it as the occasion for the outing of the season. To Mr. H. X. Southwell, ...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DOROTHY DOT DOLLS DRESSMAKER [BY THE EDITOR THIS TIME.] [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

DOT DRESSMAKER [BY THE EDITOR THIS TIME.] THE shop windows are all bright with   spring fashions, and the grown-ups are having their cool clothes for the warm weather. And, of course, although there doesn't seem to be much change in dolly's fashions, she can't be expected to wear the thick heavy clothing she wore in the cold weather. A very little friend of mine has a large family of dolls. If I had thought of it in time, I would have shown you their photographs. There is Miss Win- nifred Wood, a big Dutch doll, with black hair and a wee pointy nose between red cheeks. She moves her arms and legs like railways signals, and is very stiff and formal in her movements. She never smiles, and is generally believed to be a schoolteacher. She has a dark grey frock, and won't wear a hat, because the only way it will stick on is when a tack is driven through the crow into the top of her head, and Ailsa-that's the little girl-says "It might kill her." Then there is Edith. She is b...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE FOURTH DIMENSION. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

THE FOURTH DIMENSION. SOME time ago H. G. Wells published a novel called "The   Time Machine." In it a party of scientific friends discuss the possi- bility of adding a fourth dimension, and the three already existing, viz:   length, breadth and thickness-the fourth dimension being time or existence. A block of ice pos- sesses all three, for the period of its being ice; but when   it is melted into water, the possibility of it, as ice, being mea- sured by time becomes feasible. It was a pretty theory, on which to found a tale of much interest, and the book is one of the most fascin- ating that Mr. Wells has written;   but we only use his story as a text on which to hang a sermon of our own. When a man was dependent on his unaided efforts of locomotion, dis- stance was a serious difficulty to overcome. So serious, that to-day his is as energetic as ever in en- deavouring to conquer it. In the last century, ships were sometimes weeks...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Our French Column. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

Our French Column. M. Perier invites subscribers to form a corres- pondence class, and offers a series of prizes to such of our readers as use Periers New Illustrated French Method. Letters should be addressesd- M. PERIER, Editor French Column, Children's Newspaper, 17 Castelreagh Street, Sydney.

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NEWS OF THE EMPIRE [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

A BRITISH WARSHIP - The Melita - has just visited Sebastopol, in the Crimean peninsula. This is the first visit of a British ship since the sad and foolish war of 1853. At the great Black Sea grain-exporting port of Odessa the British officers were entertained right royally by the Russian garrison. THE ANNUAL Nile River flood, which fertilises the northern part of Egypt by carrying down the rich black sediment supplied by the Abyssinian mountains, reaches its greatest height at Khartoum in September (it begins to rise each May). News comes from Africa that the present flood is the worst for many years past. This will mean that the season in the Nile Valley will be a poor one, and the supply of wheat, cotton, etc., will be much diminished. THE WESTERN part of our Indian Empire, like our own land, has long suffered from a terrible drought;     but on September 10 heavy rains fell, and there is every hope now that the wheat crop will be a suc- cess. THE BRITIS...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

SPECIAL NOTICE. The receipt of your copy in a coloured wrappre is an intimation that your subscription has expired. If you wish to renew it, kindly send Postal Note or Stamps at once. The receipt of your copy in a white wrapper after that is an acknowledg- ment of the remittance.

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

Sentences taken from the text in pages 19 and 21 of the "New Illustrated Method," and pages 74 and 75 for a few adjectives:-     1. Young Jack learnt little or nothing. 2. England is a fine country. 3. We know that this will make Char- lotte happy. 4. His friend's large ship is painted blue and white. 5. A sailor's son said that he was on the point of leaving for Sydney. 6. The mother and her son will not hear about travelling.

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

For Whooping Coughs and Chest Colds,  

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ANSWERS FOR JULY. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

ANSWERS FOR JULY. Ida H. Allen, Lake Cowal, 9. Myrtle Lurland, Young, 8. Alice Lurland, Young, 8. Alice G. Coyle, Wagga, 6. The maximum marks are ten, one being deducted for each error. Correspondents may have their corrected sheets re- turned on forwarding a penny stamp to the Editor C.N. Elliot Heriot omitted to translate thw sentences, and W. R. Pollock the story. Eva Burke, May Tocqueline, A. D. Kell, Tom Kerry, P. McKay, and G. Grant did not comply with the conditions. Answers to August correspondents will appear in the October issue.

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

BOVRIL!! The most Nourishing and Valuable LIQUID FOOD ever discovered. One teaspoonful makes a delicious cup of Beef Tea/ Ordinary Beef Tea is a stimulant only.   BOVRIL is BEEF in Solution; FOOD as well as   Stimulant. BOVRIL is prescribed by Medical men all over the world. BOVRIL is sold in all the respectable hotels in London. BOVRIL is dispensed in all the Hosptial and BOVRIL is sold at 150,000 shops in Great Britain. BOVRIL surpasses everything in maintaining strength and building up weak consti- tutions. RANKIN & Co. Bovril Representatives, 341 KENT STREET, SYDNEY

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE ABORIGINAL NAMES OF PLACES. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

THE ABORIGINAL NAMES OF PLACES. The Hon. Geo. Thornton, M.L.C., who is understood to be one of the best living authorities on the language of the abori- gines, has forwarded to Mr. Archibald Campbell, M.L.A., of Wollongong, the following remarks concerning the names of places mentioned. He considers, very truly, that the proper native rendering of the names given, and their respective meanings, are well worth remembering. Mr. Thornton writes :—"I had a good knowledge of the names of those places 40 or 50 years ago, when I used to camp out among the blacks about Wollongong, Kiama, and Jervis Bay, but my memory of these things, not having been exercised   very much of late years, has faded a good deal. I dare say that you know, too, that the aboriginal dialect differed much within distances of 70 or 80 miles. For example, the language of the Sydney of Botany Bay blacks was quite unintelli- gible to those of Kiama and Shoalhaven. And the same difference existed north and s...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CHATTER PAGE EDITOR'S NOTE. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

HÄTTE» fi EDITOR'S NOTE. We want to encourage our little friends to Bend us short, chatty letters on matters of general interest. Every month we will print a page of the best, and ¡it the end of the year give a prize for the best letter sent in. The points on which it will gain a place will be composition and subject. Any letters not for publication should be headed PRIVATE. Dear Editor, -A very unusual thing happened last night. We had snow -a thing that we never had before. Between five and six it began to snow, and lasted to between six and seven. It snowed a little between eight and nine, but not much. It was about two inches deep on the ground, and it was the first snow any of us had ever seen, except mother and father. I had great fun, and made three snow men. It was little sister Winnie's sixth birthday. She would not stay in the house, because she said the snow was sent for her birthday. The cattle and horses did not know what to make of it, one horse especially-a grey one. ...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
KEPT IN. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

KEPT IN. Tilt' boy stood on the schoolroom form, Whence all but he had fled ; Thc calm hud now dispelled the storm That raged about his head. But sorrowful and sad he stood, For he was in disgrace A "pickle" in a mournful mood, With proud though grimy face. Thc t ime rolled on ; he could not go Without his master s word. That master, at his desk below-, His voice no longer heard. He called aloud, " Must 1 be kept ? My tooth, sir, is so bad ! " He knew not that the master slept, Unconscious of the lad. He shouted out once more aloud, "Sii\ T shall lose my train." With bended head and shoulders bowed, The master snored amain. Upon his cheeks tears came and went ; He pulled his inky hair ; And from that post of punishment He looked in sheer despair. "Say, please sir," once again he cried, "If I may yet begone ;" And but a louder snore replied - His master slumbered on. Then came a burst of thunder sound. Ti ir boy, oh, where was he! The form capsized, lay on the ground, To wake the dom...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

It trikes a pound of scoured wool to make a yard of cloth (28Ù1. wide), and lilh.-. of greasy to make the saine quan- tity. The greasy is better to send to the mills than the scoured, because it's less trouble in the long run if scoured in their own way.

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BUYING A CAMEL [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

IN his very interesting book, " With Kitchener to Khartum," Mr. (x. W. Steevens gives this account of his purchase of a pair of camels " I got to Assouan and there a new trial awaited mc. 1 had no camels and it would he absurd to go to the Soudan without camels. Now I knew nothing at all about the points of a camel, nor of its market price, nor what it eats, nor could I ride it. However, camels had to be bought, and I borrowed an interpreter and went out to the Bisharin Village, outside Assouan, and bought some. The interpreter said he knew all about camels and that the}" were worth £27 a pair. "First, though, tiley had to be tried. The Bisharin were all standing about grouped round little heaps of dry cracked mud, which it took a moment's considera- tion to recognise as their houses. Their costume consisted mainly of their hair in little tight plaits tumbling every way over their heads ; they have it done thus in infancy, and never take it out of curl : it looks like the inside hai...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Football. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

Football. On the 12th instant, ai the Syd. Cricket (¡round, the Grammar School de feated The King's School in the final for the Schools' Premiership by 12 to 5. The full record of the results for the Schools' Premiership is as follows : S.O.S. T.K.S. N.C. St. J. Pts. S.G.S. .. 15-0 9-0 34-4 - 3-8 8-0 8-7 - 12-5 - -24 T.K.S. .. 0.16 - 13-8 0-0 8-3 - 19-0 26-3 5-12 - 20 X.C. .. 0-9 8-13 - 10-0 0-8 0-19 - 0-9 4 St. J. .. 4-34 6-9 0-10 7-8 3-26 9-0 - 4

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Athletics. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

Athletics. At the Public Schools' sports, held at the Agri- cultural Ground on Fri dav, loth inst., the most important event. the 100 yards N. S. W. Public Schools' Championship, was won by W. Ross, Fort-street, in ll 2-Ö seconds ; H. Moore, Fort-street, 2. Thc winner won his heat in ll seconds. \V. buchanan, S.G.S. won the b~>0 yards All Schools' Handicap. George Smith, who, it will be remem- bered, was a member of thc last New Zealand football team, will compete at the Australasian Championship meeting, to be held in brisbane in November. I learn from New Zealand that the crack three-quarter stood out of all the inter provincial matches, which goes to show thai he means business. He i- a very fleet young fellow, and should givea good account of himself. The annual gathering of the Clarence River Public Schools' Amateur Athletic Association was held at Elizabeth Island on Wednesday, last. Nearly the whole of the schools on the river wo e repre- sented. Five hundred children took...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x