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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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WORTH KNOWING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

WORTH KNOWING. The length of the night at any time of the year may be found accurately, within a few minutes, by multiplying by two the time of the sun's rising. Doubling the time of its setting will give the length of the day.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SEA PERILS. ICEBERGS HOLD A SHIP. FOR FOUR DAYS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

SEA PERILS. ICEBERGS HOLD A SHIP.   FOR FOUR DAYS. Far south in the Pacific Ocean a strange ad- venture recently befell Captain Puxley and the crew of the good ship Dowan Hill, of Glasgow. The vessel, bound for Queenstown, with a cargo of wheat, suddenly found herself surrounded by icebergs and icefloes. Before the ship could escape she was a prisoner. As the bergs drifted nearer the cold became in- tense. Fortunately the weather remained fine, but for four whole days the Dowan Hill lay enclosed and helpless, with a constant prospect before her of being ground to matchwood by the huge shift- ing masses of ice. It was a wonderful and picturesque scene, though the sailors at the time scarcely apprecia- ted it properly. Nothing was to be seen around but countless peaks of dazzling white. When the sun shone on them they glittered like colossal diamonds, and to gaze on them distressed the eye. Some of the bergs towered up to a height of 300ft. As the icy cordon was tightened...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ALL OVER LONDON. WITHOUT LEAVING SYDNEY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

    ALL OVER LONDON.   WITHOUT LEAVING SYDNEY. The new chum in Sydney who sighs for the     "sweet shady side of Pall Mall" cannot have     his wish gratified, but he may see a good deal     of London without going beyond the suburbs of     Sydney. He will find Charing Cross (in the     East), Waterloo (in the West), Paddington (on     the way to Charing Cross), and Liverpool-street     in Paddington itself. It is unfortunate that     not one of the four has a railway terminus at-     tached to it. but the home-sick traveller may     console himself by strolling down the Strand—     an arcade leading from Pitt-Street to George-street     ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DICKENS MSS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

DICKENS MSS. The statement is made by the London cor-     respondent of the Birmingham "Post'' that sev-     eral Dickens letters have been given to the MSS.     Department of the British Museum, with the     proviso that they are not to be open to public     inspection for 20 years. Are these the love-     letters of which tidings recently came from     America?

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NERVOUSNESS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

NERVOUSNESS. A little girl said to her mother one day,     "Mother, I feel nervous."   "Nervous!" said the mother; "what is ner- vous?" "Why, it's being in a hurry all over."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE PENTRIDGE SCANDALS. MORE CARELESSNESS EXPOSED. A CONVICT INTOXICATED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

THE PENTRIDGE SCANDALS.   —♦— MORE CARELESSNESS EXPOSED. A CONVICT INTOXICATED.   Another instance of the laxity of supervision prevailing at the Pentridge Penal Establishment, and the lack of discipline there, was afforded by the fact that on the afternoon of December 23, about 2.30, a convict named Malone, serving a term of imprisonment for practising the confi- dence trick, was found in a helpless state of intoxication, and was removed by two warders to the hospital, where the electric battery was applied to him. It appears that Malone, who is nearing the expiration of his sentence, was allowed more latitude than other convicts. Part of his duties consisted in sweeping the guardroom, where he discovered a bottle of whisky, which had been brought into the establishment for the use of the warders at the Christmas convivialities. Malone forestalled them, however, by drinking the whole bottle of whisky himself, with the result that he was found in a helpless...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ECCENTRICITIES OF ELECTRICITY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

ECCENTRICITIES OF ELECTRICITY. In three instances lately the uncertainty of the action of electricity upon human beings and animals was shown. At Buffalo, U.S.A., 3000 volts were sent through an elephant without so much as making him wink an eye.     A few days ago at one of the street car power- houses in America an electrician placed his hand where he had no business to, and it is estimated that 1800 volts passed through his body, partly stunning him. He recovered in a few minutes and, except for a slight sickness and numbness for a day or two, was none the worse for his ad- venture. The last case happened a few weeks ago, and, though it ended in death, there were some amus-   ing features about it. A farmer who lives near Jersey City has been studying electricity; and among his apparatus was an ordinary physician's battery, the whole force of which could not or- dinarily hurt a child.   This farmer has—or, rather, had—a mustang ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE KING'S HOUSE. AT THE TOWER OF LONDON. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

THE KING'S HOUSE. AT THE TOWER OF LONDON. WHERE HIS MAJESTY IS SUPPOSED TO TAKE     REFUGE IN TIMES OF CIVIL COMMOTION.     This relic of ancient days has been brought   into prominence by a recent discussion. There   is now little doubt that the real reason for its   being so called is because it was set aside in   olden times as a royal harbor of refuge.   . . ' _ .

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE HEAT OF STREET PAVEMENTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

THE HEAT OF STREET PAVEMENTS. A careful test was recently made to determine   the comparative heat radiation of four kinds of   street pavement—wood, asphalt, granite block, and macadam. The average temperature of the macadam was found to be 102 degrees; of asphalt, 113 degrees; of granite 115 degrees; and of wood, 124 degrees. This shows that the general belief as to the excessive heat of asphalt is erroneous, for wood is the hottest material in use. Further tests seemed to show that the macadam pavement has several advantages over the asphalt particularly. It retains water longer after it has been sprinkled, and it much easier to keep the dust laid on it. Theoretically, asphalt might be thought less dusty than any other kind of pavement, but practically it is worse than macadam in this respect, owing to the difficulty of keeping the surface properly wet. Besides, constant travel has the effect of grinding the asphalt into fine powder, and thus produces du...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NO FLYING IN RUSSIA. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

  NO FLYING IN RUSSIA.             A mechanic in the town of Archangel invented   a flying machine, and went to the local police to   ask permission to use it. He was afraid he would get into trouble if he began to fly without a license. The head of the police consulted his     law books, wrote to St. Petersburg for a later   edition, and finally told the inventor that, as the   law nowhere permits a machine to fly through   the air, he must decline to establish a prece-   dent.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GERMAN ACTRESSES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

  GERMAN ACTRESSES.   Actresses in Germany are paid considerably   less than actors, and their contracts usually   stipulate that they shall provide stage costumes   at their own expense, though for men all his-   torical costumes are supplied by the manage-   ment.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOSTESS AT ARUNDEL CASTLE. DURING CORONATION FESTIVITIES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

HOSTESS AT ARUNDEL CASTLE.   DURING CORONATION FESTIVITIES.   The Duke of Norfolk's sister, who, as a cor-   respondent mentioned recently (says "Free-   Lance") will play the part of "hostess" for   him at the Coronation festivities. Lady Mary   Howard, is a woman much beloved by her   friends. She is tall, and of slender figure for   her years, with soft grey hair, lifted back from a   kindly and gentle face; she is pale, and her eyes   are a very dark brown—the kind of eyes that   smile irresistibly, even when the features are   grave. This is her great charm. She dresses   well, and in a dignified style, extremely suitable   to her height and bearing. Her voice is "ever   soft and low," and she has a trick of clasping   her hands together when she speaks of anything &amp...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WANTED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

WANTED.   Oh, for a glimpse of a natural boy—   A boy with freckled face,   With forehead white 'neath tangled hair   And limbs devoid of grace.   Whose feet toe in, while his elbows flare;   Whose knees are patched all ways;   Who turns as red as a lobster when   You give him a word of praise.   A boy who's born with an appetite,   Who seeks the pantry shelf   To eat his "piece'' with resounding smack,   Who isn't gone on himself.   A "Robinson Crusoe" reading boy,   Whose pockets bulge with trash;   Who knows the use of rod and gun,   And where the brook trout splash.   It's true he'll sit in the easiest chair,   With his hat on his tousled head;   That his hands and feet are everywhere,   For youth must have room to spread. ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A BOY PREACHER. A SAGE REVIVALIST OF SIXTEEN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

A BOY PREACHER.     A SAGE REVIVALIST OF SIXTEEN.   "Jack Cook," a young revivalist of 16, who has been preaching since he was 12, began a week's mission recently at Bloomsbury Chapel, England, the historic home of Nonconformity. Although the lad comes direct from America, and is accompanied by an assistant with a pro- nounced New England accent, he is not an   American. He hails from Manchester.   In 1897, at a prayer meeting in his father's   house, he arose and began exhorting the people.   Soon his gifts became noised abroad. He went   to America, and for three years be has been   preaching in all parts of the continent.   Short, thin-faced, nervous, he gives his hearers   the impression of being highly strung and too   tensely wrought. His voice is somewhat thin,   and his declarations often amusingly boyish in ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SUBMARINE MOTHER-SHIP. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

SUBMARINE MOTHER-SHIP.     I am told (writes a London correspondent of   the "Glasgow Herald") that a large steamer   which is being built in France, ostensibly for the   merchant marine, is really destined for service   in the Navy in connection with the scheme of     submarine warfare, the object being to enable   this ship, with specially-designed derrick     cranes, to lift the submarine boats from the   water and deposit them through large hatchways   in the hold below the water-line. This arrange-   ment will correspond in some respects to that   adopted in the Vulcan of His Majesty's fleet,   which is able to lift torpedo boats of the second   class, and to repair them, as well as undertake   general repair work for the fleet to which she &am...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A LOVERS' QUARREL. AND ITS SEQUEL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

      A LOVERS' QUARREL.     AND ITS SEQUEL.       One night a newly-engaged couple were going to the theatre. In the cab the young man asked his fiancee to let him see her ring for a moment, some peculiarity of its sparkle having caught his eye, although why she should have had her glove off no one can tell. She gave him the ring, and he examined it for a time in the light of the cab window. When the cab stopped, she asked him for the ring. "But I gave it back to you, and you took it." "No, you did not. I have not had it since I gave it to you." Lights were brought, search was made, clothes were shaken—every piece where a diamond ring could possibly lie concealed was uncovered. The ring could not be found. Each persisted—he that he gave the ring back, she that she did not re- ceive it. Assertion became argument; argument changed from heat to ice; communication was interrupted, an...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SAN FRANCISCO GLOVE FIGHT. FOR THE HEAVY-WEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

SAN FRANCISCO GLOVE FIGHT.       FOR THE HEAVY-WEIGHT   CHAMPIONSHIP.   The fight for the heavy-weight championship of   the world between J. J. Jeffries and Gus Ruhlin   took place at San Francisco on Friday evening,   November 22, before a crowd of 10,000 people in the Mechanics' Pavilion. It was one of the most unsatisfactory fights ever witnessed, Jeffries defeating Ruhlin in the fifth round, and the lat- ter quitting the ring. No one was more sur- prised than Jeffries, who asserts that he deliv- ered only one effective blow. Ruhlin says that he received a chance blow which utterly disabled him, and that Jeffries persisted in fighting low. He declares that he was unfairly handled, and injured almost from the beginning. Ruhlin appeared frightened to fight. He was practically finished in the second round, when Jeffries landed a left hook and jam that took all the fight out of hi...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW "STEAL AWAY TO JESUS" ORIGINATED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

HOW "STEAL AWAY TO JESUS"   ORIGINATED.   Mr. F. S. Thomas, manager of the New Orleans University Singers, tells the following incident regarding one of the most beautiful of negro melodies:— " 'Steal Away to Jesus' was originated in the sugar fields of Louisiana. It was used as a signal for religious meetings in the swamps by the slaves. When any of the old mother or father slaves while toiling up and down the long rows of sugar cane felt the impulse for religious communion he or she would begin singing 'Steal Away to Jesus.' As the quaint and tender melody floated over the field another voice, per- haps a quarter of a mile away, would take it up, and gradually all the slaves, numbering between 300 and 400, would join in, until a mellow chorus, inexpressibly melodious, would float away on the magnolia-laden air. "The singing would last long enough to assure the one who started it that every one had heard the signal for the meeting, which would surely take ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
POSTAL CARDS. IN A NEW GUISE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

POSTAL CARDS.         IN A NEW GUISE.     Postal cards are coming to be considered good form. Whereas they were formerly admis- sible only as a means of despatching an order to a tradesman, they may now be used for the transmission of personal messages. The stipu- lation, however, is that they must bear a repro- duction of one's house. This promises to make the fashion an exclusive one. Anybody can consult a heraldic expert and have his family insignia discovered and trans- ferred to his notepaper. But not everybody lives in a mansion that would form a desirable decora- tion for a postal card. In any case the suburban resident will, it is plain, have the advantage. Now that the use of the camera has become universal, nothing is easier than to secure a pretty country view, and any stationer can have such a view reproduced at a trifling cost on cards of a size suitable to be sent by post. It will be no uncom...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
KING CARLOS AS KNIGHT ERRANT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

KING CARLOS AS KNIGHT ERRANT.   From Portugal comes rather a pretty story of five Spanish chorus girls appealing successfully to King Carlos for help, after finding themselves   stranded at Lisbon through the disappearance of the manager and treasurer of the troupe to which they belonged, carrying with him all the cash. Their consul declined to do anything for them, and, accordingly, they decided to appeal to the King. Their attempts to secure an audi- ence by means of a letter proved fruitless, so they travelled out to Cintra, where he was spending the summer, and, taking advantage of the fact that the public are admitted to the Royal Gardens, remained concealed behind a bush until they saw the King approaching, whereupon all five burst suddenly upon him and surrounded him. Somewhat startled, the burly and enormously stout young King inquired of the ladies in what way he could oblige them. Whereupon they all began to talk and cry at once. Carlos had the ut...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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