ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: American Presbyterian Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 44,014 items from American Presbyterian, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
44,014 results
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 22 March 1860

QAVING FUND. _* ¦ . - ¦ _^ _O NATIONAL SAFETY TRUST COMPANY, CHARTERED BY THE STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA. 1. Money is received every day, and In any amount, large or small.'_- ' .;!_•• • . > •¦ ¦- .,.- l •• •---2. FIVE PER CENT, is paid for money from, the day it is put in. ,_^ . 3. The money is always-paid back in GOLD, whenever it is called for, and. without notice. , , \ 4. Money is received from Executors, _AdmmUtrators , _ff _luardiaMt, _and~otke_^ ; wli© desire to%ave it,in _a_^jplack of perfect safety, _aijd where interest can be obtained for it'* " "' ¦ ' ¦ - - ¦ ' 5. The money received from depositors- is invested in REAL ESTATE, MORTGAGES; GROUND RENTS, and such other first-class securities as the .Charter directs. ...,_;. ,. r ., 6. Office hours—Every day from 9 till five o'clock, and on Mondays and Thursdays till 8 o'clock in the evening.

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 22 March 1860

1 I _,s 1 _s [ 5 > Adherence io Principle.—In one of the country school distric t_^,within a few miles of Philadelphia, v a young lady who has charge of-a large and interesting school _watf_^ortridden by one of the directors to open and _jdkpia_^ftlb .payer. The lady told him she would _consUe_^fae_^aatter before giving her decision. After much thdught and prayer on the subject, she went to the _difesptor the next day, and told him, " Sir, I have made up my mind that I will open and close witlj_^, prayer while I h ave charge of the school. If you<lo not like my decision, dismiss me, with a certificate of the cause, and I will leave you." ¦ But she js teacher still. They prefer to keep her, for she is liked by teachers and parerits, and respected by all. She put the question to vote among .her scholars, aad but two pupils .out of _Bixty voted to .-dispense with _grayer.

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 22 March 1860

A TKUE WOMAH. "When a man of sense comes to marry , it is a companion whom he wants, not an artist. It is not merely a creature who can paint and play, sing and dance—it is a being who can comfort and counsel him—one who can reason and reflect, and feef and * judge and discourse and discriminate—one who can assist him in his affairs , lighten his sorrows, purify his joys, strengthen his principles, and educate his children. Such is the woman who is fit for a mother and the mistress of a family. A woman of the former description may occasionally figure in the drawing-room, and attract the admiration of the company; but she is entirely unfit for a helpmate to a man, or to train up a child id the way it should go."

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 22 March 1860

GENTLEMEN'S FURNISHING EHP0RIUH, W. W. KNIGHT'S, ' 606 A.BCH STREET. Tine Shirts, Collars and Wrappers, at WHOLESALE, RETAIL, ' OR MADE TO ORDER. UNDER CLOTHING OF EVERY _DESCRIPTION. New Styles of Ties, Scarfs, &c, Always on Hand. The Largest Assortment of Gent's Superb Dressing ' Gowns IN THE CITY. 7l6-febr2.1y

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 22 March 1860

THE .STATE _SJLVIH.0-8._TVHD. Ho. 241;DQ0k Street, Philadelphia, NEXT DOOS TO THE POST _OFPICB. ,,, . Snms large and small are received daily, and every Monday evening on deposit. Any sum of money wanted is returned woet ever called for. Many Persons open accounts with this.Company, a.« d draw, their jnoney by Checks, as in Bank, thus combining convenience and profit. " Interest is paid! on all sums of Money, amounting to Three Dbllai s or more, at; tfie rate of Five Per Cent. Per Annum.; _JXp _Nottce.isreo . uired by this Company for the payment of either Prmcipal _^ or Interest. Substantial satisfaction.to Depositors hasj without exception, attended the operations and efforts of this wellknown Institution. - GEO. H. HART, President. CHARLES G. IMLAY, Cashiei. , mar. 5-1 yr. J. HENRY HAYES, First Teller.

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 22 March 1860

MELODEONS —THE UNDERSIGNED RE-._spectfully informs the Publicthat he is manufacturing these delightful Instruments, of every size, style, and price. Having had a practical experience of over ten years in the construction of them, he feels confident of .bis ability to produce, an article equal to any in the market. All Instruments made by him are fully warranted and any defect in material or workmanship will-be made good at any time. SCf- Tuning and Repairing carefully attended to. • ' - : _. « A. MACNUTT, feb. 10-1 yr. 108 worth sixth street, Philadelphia.

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 22 March 1860

xiuw _; <-*^»> WHAT A BEAK LITTLE SISTER. _suu aua toueuing, yec now _oeauuiui, is the. loving, heroic exculpation of this little sister: "On Friday afternoon a fatal accident happened to a little girl, daughter of Mrs. Cole, residing seven miles south of this city, on the Horn Lake road. The little girl, whose age was seven years, was playing in the house with her twiri-brother , when he, in the wantonness of sport, seized a gun, and fired at her, seventeen buckshot, taking effect ! in her throat. She immediately ran toward the 1 door, where, meeting her mother, sho exclaimed: "Brother didn't go to do it," and died almost instantaneously '

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 29 March 1860

METHODS m _STUDYING HISTORY. For the American Presbyterian. BY WIHuIAM G. _WINSLOW. Is it best to think of history as a series of brilliant pictures, fanciful and dazzling dramas, without regard to truth? or is it best to read and study it by a slow, thoughtful, careful process of invesgation ?-—for it is "philosophy teaching by examples." By following the latter course , we are better enabled to understand its relations, and place a just value upqn its specific object. A historical method, assuming some apprehension of its object, and a definite conception of history, with boundary lines, fixed limits, and connective links, clears the way of many doubts, throws light upon mysteries, and leads the mind to a better conception, and more masterly comprehension of its significance and aim; Whatever is here said on the methods of studying history, will apply more to the mature intellect, and have but little reference to those beginning the alphabet of this extensive subject, and ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 29 March 1860

€nt:i:fsjinitfifiii_*f_. PRAYER FOR EDITORS. Much is said and written, at tbe present-day upon the importance and benefits of prayer, and too much cannot be said. The religious papers almost weekly, present earnest appeals for the united prayers of Christians, in behalf of colleges, seminaries, missionary societies and kindred Christian associations, that God's Holy Spirit may rest npon and guide them, so that the influences they send forth may be pure and holy, healthy and saving wherever felt. And how often is special prayer urged for the clergy, particularly when their position is commanding, their influence widespread, and their power indisputable and almost irresistible over the multitude, that these watchmen upon the heights of Zion, swerve not from duty, nor blow from the Gospel trumpet an uncertain sound. These soul-stirring appeals move the great deep of earnest Christian hearts, and they humbly bow before God in fervent supplications, for the regenerating and sanct...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 29 March 1860

"IS THE EELIGIOUS WANT OF THE ME ; ' • ¦'-J ¦ - : - • ¦ • " ' _^ MET?" - • • -- : ' ¦¦ = '- ¦ ' :": _-' U nder this title the March number of the Atlantic Monthly, has a very _sensible article on the ministry and preaching. We make a few suggestive extracts, on the preparatory training and qualifications for the ministerial office. The writer says:— : _= " - :.- ¦¦ >.---.-._\. ': r - ¦ ¦:¦ "That a man is found or finds himself in any calling is iio evidence whatever thathe; is fitted for that calling. This is just as true of the ministry as of _,any other vocation. Every man of business knows this. The clergy seem to us behind the age in _lieing astonishingly blind to it. ' Men of business know that only a very small fraction of their number can ever attain eminent success. They know that, in a term of twenty years, ninety-seven men in a hundred fail. Here and. _tiiere one develops a remarkable talent for the specific business in which he is engaged. The ninety-and-nine...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 29 March 1860

OEGAKIC _TOITY. The true Church of Christ is one. Its various parts mustbe united in doctrine, spirit, and life, or they eattndt claim connection with the Great Head. With this essential unity,- different forms of external' organization are not inconsistent, and hence we find as the result of various causes that the Church exists in a variety of forms, ranging from those which approximate spiritual _despotism, to the absence of-almost all form in a Ibose and irresponsible democracy. Prelatists adhere to the former, and Independents to the latter; while Presbyterians have attained the happy medium in a system, which in the largest possible measure combines both law and liberty. Each class claims, that it is right, and each must answer to God for the views it holds, arid the consequences that follow them. We are not now concerned to discuss the claims set up by either extreme, but, to state briefly the Presbyterian position; for we consider ignorance of it to %e" tie cause of tn...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 29 March 1860

¦P OPEEY IS THE _SOfTTH OF FEA1_TCE. The remembrance of the cruelties perpetrated in the dragonnades of Louis XIV., and the hardships inflicted on the Protestant people, especially in remote localities and small villages, even down to the very outbreak of the -Revolution, is still fresh in the minds of the numerous Protestant families whose ancestors were the sufferers. The dark dungeons of the castle of Aigues-mortes, in which so many hundreds of Protestants have pined away at different timesj its thick walls, upon which one may read inscribed countless names of these unfortunates, the sad tales which _^ the ke_^er_. hi|aself will tell you7 bf them, as for instance _^ of a Protestant maiden kept a prisoner for 40 years in one and the same dungeon ; these things combine to preserve a lively remembrance of that era of hatred and barbarity_^ But the Catholic population of the present period pursue a course in no way adapted to remove these sad impressions from the memory of Pr...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 29 March 1860

A REMARKABLE CONVERSION IN BiLOOSit JUr. _Hamlin of Constantinople, writes to one, who in 1857, went with, him on a visit to Broosa, giving an account of a ea_^e of conversion which strikingly illustrates the_^ower of divin e grace. The person referred to was an Armenian, fire man. -. . .... . . . . ... .. .iV::.,. . . .. .- . _^ - Up to within two;nfonths of our visit, this fireman had been a great roWdyj a drunkard, a vile, filthy blasphemerj and a'eruei abuser of his family and life aged'parents. His cq nversion Was so singular, that its reality was for a time distrusted. He left his home one Sabbath morning, alreadyhalf drunkf" to go-down into the marketplace to join his felloWs_; Passing, the shop and residence of a _Protestant shoemaker;^ he heard him reading and stopped to li&te_'n by the open door. " Walk in," said the shoemaker; "Jf am reading the Word of Gb_(Lw He stepped in; «and sat down. The shoemaker was reading in Isaiah, 5th chapter:: "Wo unto them*-t...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 29 March 1860

"LET ME DIE _GTTIETLY." "Be still—make no noise—let me die quietly."—Vice President King. ,...-/'Be stilll'i,._«_JThe,hour of the soul's departure is at hand; earth is fading from its vision. Time_, is gliding from its presence. Hopes that cluster around young life, that swell in the bosom of manhood, have fallen from around it like the forest leaves when the frosts of autumn have chilled them into death. Ambition with its hollow promises, and pride with its lofty look, have vanished away. The world with its deceitful ness, pleasure with its gilded temptations, are gone; and alooe, in utter destitution of all that time promised, it must start on its solemn journey across the valley of the shadow of death 1 " Make no noise I" Let the tumult of life cease. Let no sound break the soul's communion with itself, ere it starts on its returnless flight. Trouble it not with accents of sorrow. Let the tear stand still on the cheek of affection, and let not the wailings of grief break th...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 29 March 1860

_EELHHOUS WAHTS OF A BUSY LIFE. Social action and material enterprise and aggressive discovery, which are tbe grand characteristics of modern society, bring along with them the hazard of an irreligious self reliance, a skepticism about all that is invisible and impalpable to sense, and a feverish propensity to judge everything by its show and its returns. So the bulk of our enterprise outgrows its strength; and in the pride of all his pushiDg schemes, and marvellous machinery, man comes to esteem' himself little less than a critic of Revelation and copartner with the Almighty, whom the church of Christ ought to consider herself much beholden to if he condescends to say kind things of her, and whom God himself cannot fail to covet as an ally for so much business and motion, if indeed there is any other God than the science that perfects the engine, and the motive-power that turns the factorywheel. As long as you »preach to sueh a man about his stupendous capacity, and stimula...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 29 March 1860

% 4 m m »' « SOMETHING TO BE EEAD- The intelligent reader will declare it of no second importance. Surely the great demand upon earth is the publication of the Gospel, and surely that publication is more important in regions where it has never been uttered, than where it has been for years or ages reiterated. Beyond the memory of the oldest inhabitant in many an enlightened locality have been the reverberations of sermons to "build up" God's people as well as give pastors a support, while the hearers generally have "built up" for themselves surplusages in worldly goods sufficient to keep a dozen voices sounding to Buddhists or Brahmins. There is a responsibility for the great wrorig somewhere. It is not upon men in a mass: When the great white throne shall appear, the inquisition for the blood of souls will not come down upon Churches, conferences, or synods, but upon individuals. Then you, dear reader, whether you are a preacher or a layman, (as surely as the humble writer,) ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 29 March 1860

ffiitfg For tbe American Presbyterian. FORBlTINltNDWELLtNa. Enter my heart, O God of grace I Make it thy quiet dwelling-place; • Enfold me m thy changeless peace, That I from all but Thee inuy cease. Forgive that oft my spirit wears Her time and strength in trivial cares, Forgive that I so oft have done What I as sinful ought to shun. Draw me to Thee, for I would rise Above these earthly vanities; Let me with pure and quenchless fire Thy favor and thyself desire! Henceforth let every thought and deed On Thee be fixed, from Thee proceed! Oh come, thyself my soul prepare, And mike thy dwelling ever there! ANGEtUS, 1657.

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 29 March 1860

Thus go on, dear Presbyterian , and carry many words of comfort and encouragement to the way-worn pilgrims on the highway of life, and follow them even down to "Jordan's strand," with some sweet foretastes of the bliss in reserve on the "Shining shore/' and you wip nobly fulfil your loving mission. II.

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 29 March 1860

EH Whitney, the inventor of the cotton gin, was born at Westborougli, Mass., Dec 8,1765. He worked'Ms wt ay through college arid _graduated arYkie iri? 1792: ' -

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 29 March 1860

THOMAS PAINE.—III. Those who remember, John Pintard, LL.D., will easily admit that no better authority exists in this world, both for facts recollected, and integrity of motive in stating them. He told me himself, what I now narrate. Whether less or more important, I doubt if ifc has ever beforejbeen printed or even written. Paine was not overfond of speaking of it, unless when somewhat soaked with wine. This was at a dinner-party, about 1803-4, just after his return to this country. How he came to be sentenced, or tried, or accused, I pause not, I care not, to tell or remember.. It is a fact that, with a miserable squad of others, in Paris, France, he and they were all imprisoned in cells, two in each, ironed, and waiting for the execution of the order, next day, of decapitation by the Guillotine. The doors of each cell were double in two ways. Two opened into a narrow space, where were two more; nYade of massive size, barred with iron, locked, and impracticable ' to all but th...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
x
Loading...
x
x