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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 29 business to keep the party together and see that no ono killed a buffalo until the proper ceremonies had been per formed and the order was given by the chief. They wore regarded as the rep resentatives of the law and were never resisted in performing their duty or inflicting punishment. The fifth order was called "Aka-kano-na," or "Crazy men." They were men more than fifty years of age, and wore not expected to go to war, but must have graduated from all the lower orders. Their duties were religious and ceremonial, and their insignia con sisted of a bow and a bundle of blunt arrows. Their dance was the Aka-ka-wa or crazy dance, which well deserved tle name. The sixth was the order of the "Dog men." They had four principal lead ers and two lesser leaders. The Tho crazy danco called "Psam" by tho Glioyonno an'J "Aliaka nri" by tlio Arapalioo, lolongod to ono ordor of tho military organization. Tho namo in both languages moans crazy. Men, women and children took...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

30 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Xke ;Aigel ofjpurgatory. How many sweet reminiscences this title recalls to a Christian Mind Spiritual Life and the Devotion for the Holy Souls. HOW THIS DEVOTION FOSTERS THE SPIRIT OF HOLY JOY. Christmas is essentially the season of joy. The angel himself in announcing the first Christmas, proclaimed: " Be hold, I bring you good tidings of great joy." Ever since then the celebration of Christmas has brought joy and mer riment and gladnebs to the hearts of men; spiritual and heavenly joy to those devout Christians who have heeded the admonitions of their Holy Church and prepared themselves prop erly for a godly and worthy celebration of the Holy Day; joy to even lukewarm Christians at the remembrance of the great truth of the Incarnation and all its blessings. Yea, this joy is not con fined to the followers of Christ alone it overflows as it were the boundaries of the church, and in a manner inun dates the whole earth. All that know of Christ and Christianity...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 31 to us valueless and aimless. If, bo sides, the recollection of the human frailties and weaknesses of the dear de parted enters into this sorrow, how dis consolate should we be indeed, if there was no alternative but Heaven or hell. Then our Holy faitli takes the keen edge ofr our sorrow, and cheers and comforts us by its teaching of im mortality, resurrection, and a mid dle state of souls departed. Though the bodily separation from our de parted be permanent, i. e., for this earth, yet our spirits may be nearer even then they were in life. If the departed was subject to venial faults, as even the just man falleth seven times a day, we know that he is not on that account eternally cast away, but that God's mercy enables the soul in the other life even to atone for venial failings. If wo lived and In bored for the welfare of the departed during his life on earth we may now laber for him with equal devotion and with the possi bility of greater and more beneficie...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

32 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. of grace, if wo will labor very success fully for the souls departed, increases our appreciation of sanctifying grace and our caution against losing it. In the state of grace, now, wo possess joy even as a fruit of the Holy Ghost. With sanctifying grace the presence of the Holy Ghost, together with His gifts and His fruits are bestowed upon the soul of man. The security of a good conscience and of the favor of God also fills our heart with joy and happiness. Finally, the constant intercourse with these Holy Souls is of itself a source of happiness. If intercourse with good and noble creatures always brings pleasure to the human heart, how much rather must communication with the souls departed have this effect, since they are still more enobled and purified than they were on earth? There is a radiance about them which is the reflex of the dawning happiness of Heaven, and this radiant joy will brighten our own heart from our asso ciation in thought and affectio...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

T im' i"i"" '"f-w" v w tfiirf&'4$!JF"& ' witi ' w ' ju i "m ry " ynv ( The Indian Advocate. Devoted to the Interests of Indian Missions. Vol. X. APRIL, 1898. No. 2. The Late Abbot In our lust number wo gave but a short notice of the late Abbot Thomas; we give to-day a short biography of his eventful life. James Duporon was born October the 29th, 1842, at Ascain, diocese of Bay onne, Franco, and from early youth, he showed what he was to be in after years, "a man of God." Immediately after his ordination, June the 6th, 1868, he was appointed professor at the preparatory Seminary Thomas Duperon. I of Laressore; but his zeal for the sal vation of souls urged him to join a band of noble men, who as Missionaries, went through the Province preaching and bringing back the erring sheep. It was while thus engaged that the Franco-Prussian war broke out, and wo iind him on tho battle fields as army chaplain, ministering to the unfortu nate soldiers. At the close of the war he returned ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

" "ffl"y'T5ylti" "" " '"THW J?" yw H" 'tvyH'i" jyy"'y pi'i'r,ng''iii'.iiPjy wi75r,0(",,s?,r 34 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Ho felt in his heart that he could pro mote more abundantly the glory of God and advance the interests of souls more efficaciously in becoming a religious. Ever docile to the divine inpiration, he went with three companions to ask ad mittance to the newly founded monas tery of Pierre-qui-Vire, 1872; he made his profession as a Benedictine July 12th, 1S74. In the fall of 1875 we find him, with his throe companions, laying the foundations of a Benedictine Monas tery in the Diocese of Bayonne, Belloc sur Joyeuso, which though modest in deed'' in its beginnings, as the mustard seed of the Gospel, was destined to become one day a mighty tree. His Superiors had recognized his sterling qualities and soon after they called him back to the Mother-house, la Pierre-qui-Vire, to entrust to him the delicate charge of Master of Novices. As such, many a one owes him an eternal debt o...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm ,'CT,frR' THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 35 sistonce, in the heritage ofBritish liter ature, endeared to them by a community of language and historical association. And, when a few of the busy denizens of a new republic ventured to give expression to their thoughts, it was equally natural that the spirit and the principles of their ancestral literature should reappear. Scenery, border-life, the vicinity of the aborigines, and a great political experiment were the only novel features in the now world upon which to found anticipations of origi nality; in academic culture, habitual reading, moral and domestic tastes, and cast of mind, the Americans were iden tified witli the mother country; and in all essential particulars, would naturally follow the style thus inherent in their natures and confirmed by habit and study. At first, therefore, the literary development of the United States was imitative; but with the progress of the country, and her increased leisure and means o...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

:"WW? .fp-" wjt3" VfFgr?n lyvywjn-'wr'P HMBMMHIHB 36 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. XiSffT talents, at once versatile and brilliant, were apparent in the insight and poetry of debates, the solemn beauty of his devotion,, the serious argument of his ambitious labors, and the readiness of his humorous sallies; with a generous religious sentiment, he united a mercu rial temperament and grave aspirations. In his first youth, the gentleman, the hero, and the statesman, alternately exhibited, sometimes dazzled, at others impressed, and always won the hearts of his comrades. But his arm not less than his tongue was to the cause he thus espoused with equal ardor and intelligence. He studied the military art, and gained Washington's notice in the retreat of the American forces through New Jersey; and from that moment became his intimate coadjutor. His next intellectual labor was devoted to explaining and enforcing the prin ciples of finance, a subject of which his countrymen were practically ignorant....

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

rriIE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 37 of reasoning, and a faculty of making a question plain to the understanding, by the mere terms in which it is pre sented, are the traits which uniformly distinguish his writings, evident alike in a diplomatic note, a legislative debate and an historical discourse. His dig nity of expression, breath of view, and force of thought, realize the ideal of a republican statesman, in regard, at least, to natural endowments; and his presence and manner in the prime of life were analogous. Independent of their logical and rhetorical merit, the writings may be deemed invaluable from the nationality of their tone and spirit. In the speeches of Clay there is a chivalric freshness, which readily ex plains his great popularity as a man, not so profound as Webster, he is far more rhetorical and equally patriotic. Calhoun is eminently individual; his mind has that precise energy which is so effectual in debate; his style of ar gument is concise, and in personal aspect he wa...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

""PHPf1 T7'J"lfl',' ' "'i!fffffinif;'!wi'''" 7?' 38 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. early acquired. He has been loyal to the muses. At their shrine, his min istry seems ever free and sacred, wholly apart from the ordinary associations of life. With a pure heart and a lofty purpose, he has hymmed the glory of nature and the praise of freedom. As he went forth alone to muse at even tide, the reveries of genius have been to Ryan, holy and private seasons; there is no mystical lore in the tributes of his muse, all is clear, earnest, and thoughtful. Indeed, the same differ ence that exists between true-hearted, natural affections, and the metaphysical love of the Platonist, may bo traced between the manly and sincere lays of Ryan, and the vague and artificial ef fusions of transcendental-bards. Like all human beings, the burden of daily toil sometimes weighed heavily on his soul; the noisy activity of common life became hopeless; scenes of in humanity, error, and suffering, grew oppressive; then he...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

jwnn f S? """" J""Ts'??1'v"jrr"r' J'K" "T'"fj" "? '"'XT1 wtr-vj!X5iT'"w"5' "tiwj1 w'tf' ,T1 icv"" -' "w THE INDIAN AbVOCATD. 39 V' i w J- s ri ET. . .- i names more illustrious for unselfish devotion than Anthony Daniels, Claude Allouez, and James Marquette, mis sionaries to the American Indians. Even before the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth, Jesuit priests had borne the message of a Savior to the Indians liv ing on the upper waters of the Ken nebec and east of that river. They carried the symbols of their nation and religion through the wilderness till they planted the lilies of France and preached the doctrine of the cross on the shores of Lake Superior. All the way down, from the earliest colonial times, the same spirit has actuated the Benedictines and other zealous mis sionaries; ever pressing forward toward the setting sun, clearing forests, rear ing homes, cultivating fields and build ing imperial cities where before was wilderness from the Atlantic to the Pacific shore. In the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

40 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. S was unshaken. She always showed a great confidence in God, especially during her last illness. During the many weeks of suffering which pro ceeded her death, she showed herself a real Christian heroine. Her complaint was an accumulation of diseases, which caused such acute pain that she had little rest day or night. So rapid was its progress, that on the second day her life was despaired of. Notwithstand ing, she retained perfect peace of mind and quietly prepared for death. But her time had not yet come, she soon recovered enough to leave her couch of suffering and to repair to the Oratory to return thanks to our heavenly mother, to whom she attributed her cure. A few days afterwards she had a relapse, and after eight weeks of great suffering she was called to a better life. " Arrayed in a snowy robe, she lay, As though she but camly slept, And wreathed as for a festal day "While those who had loved her wept. They wept, but soft were the tears they shed ; ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 41 le Indian SdVocatc Is a Quarterly Review, published by the Benedictine Fathers of the Indian Tcr., to plead the cause of the last remnants of Indian tribes, and to give a history of their progress toward civilization. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of cah tribe; their progress in education and religion; their occupa tions, industries, schools, etc., etc. Also, a history of our mis sions, statistics, and other interesting matter that can not bo found in any other publication. The proceeds of this Review will be used for educating and converting the Indians of the Territory. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, Sacred Heart V. 0., Okla. Ter. AlTKOVKU n V RlOHT UFA'. THEO. MEERSCHAERT, Vicaii Apostolic ok Oklahoma and Indian Teiuutoky. A Quarterly Roviow, entered at the Sacred Heart Post Oilico in Oklahoma Territory, as necond-class matter. Subscriptions 60 Cents per Year. Single Copies 15 Cents. APRIL, 1898. Editorial and Local. A cracked bell never can ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

wr "SP:?fP;'l7V3! ."!T-.'!05ipp,r''IJ"'V '. !f' lr.3'Jv 42 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. place along with La Salle, Marquette, and other heroes of the Church of whom Macauley, the historian, says: "In the depths of the Peruvian mines, at the African slave caravans, on the shores of the Spice Islands, in the observato ries of China, they were to be found." They made converts in the regions which neither avarice, nor curiosity, had tempted any of their countrymen to enter." The County Democrat has the following: "Rev. Father Felix Do Grasse was elected Abbot of Sacred Heart Abbey last week, to fill the vacancy caused by the death in Paris, France, of the be loved and lamented Rev. Abbot Thomas Duperon. Father Felix has been a missionary among the Osage and Pot tawatomie Indians for nearly a quarter of a century, and can speak their lan guage as fluently as he can his native tongue. Wherever he went he built churches, schools and convents, and today in nearly every county in Okla homa these pow...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm U THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 43 - .Wrj.B.,yypay-r.ygy.CTr, . .yy np, jW 'H, L lfyy ' IjWIM ' U) "rT" A fruitful Lent and a glorious Easter to all our friends and patrons. It is better to have the poor without the rich, than the rich without the poor. What does it avail, says St Bernard, to follow C.hrist, unless wo overtake him at last? Every man has in himself a continent of undiscovered character. Happy is he who acts the Columbus of his own soul. The coward superlative, is he who has not enough honest pluck to own up to a fault, when conscience arraigns him with it. As we go to press, active preparations are made for a grand celebration on St. Patrick's day. May the efforts of the organizers be crowned with success. " " A new Church was built this year in the Pottawattomie country. St. Mary's is its name nearly all its parishioners hailing from St. Mary's, Kans. Mass was read in it the first time on January 23d. May the congregation increase in number and fervor. By...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

t-i wi')L' rw i'T" . . 44 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. K In another part of this issue wo give a short sketch of the late Miss Lily Bourbonia, a Pottowattomio Indian pupil of St. Mary's Academy, Sacred Heart Mission, Oklahoma. It will be seenthat if the Mohawk had their' 'Lily' the Pottowattomie Tribe has not been less fortunate. May our "Lily" ever serve as a model to the pupils of St. Mary's in particular, and to all pupils in general. On February 22d, the flag above Sacred Heart College floated proudly out, in honor of Washington's Birth day. In the evening the students had a torchlight procession, headed by S.H. brass band, and the day closed with all the noise both the white and Indian scholars could possibly make. This goes to show that the powers to be at the head of both institutions never overlook an opportunity to impress lessons of patriotism upon the pupils. A boy had been up for examination in scripture, had failed utterly, and the relations between him and the examiner had bec...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 45 of superstition. These influences have their effects. They work laxity and viciousness in those not noble enough to resist the endeavors to assimilate them downwards to infidelity, and they produce half-hoartedness and shame facednoss in many more. A grand and strength-giving force should be the reflection that only ho is the true Cath olic who is simple-minded. Truth is pure and simple. God is Truth. Our Divine Lord was Truth Incarnate. Duplicity hates Truth. God was hated and crucified. The same motives that worked on Calvary work now against the followers of Christ. He was despised and rejected because Ho championed simplicity. We have the persecution and ridicule on the same score. "We are simple-minded let us out and say it. Further, we are superstitious super stitious forsooth in that we believe God stands ever above us, that He regards our every thought and action, that there is nothing so small in our work-a-day life He does not interest Himself in; t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

" Wf5(. mtnSPytfT 'PrT?- Trrr y.jtJwYBr' 46 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. JL V THE CADDO AND ASSOCIATED TRIBES. The Caddo are the principal southern representatives of the Caddoan stock, which includes also theWichita, Kichai, Pawnee and Arikara. Their confed aracy consisted of about a dozen tribes or divisions, claiming as their original territory the whole of lower Red river and adjacent country in Louisiana, eastern Texas and southern Arkansas. The original home of the Caddo was on lower Red river in Louisiana. Ac cording to their own tradition, which has parallels among several other tribes, they came up from under the ground, through the mouth of a cave in a hill which they call "Cha-Kani-Na" the place of crying on a lake close to the south bank of Red river, just at its junction with the Mississippi. In those days men and animals were all brothers and all lived together under the ground. But at last they discovered the entrance to the cave leading up to the surface of the earth, and so...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 4,1 Kiowa, Commancho, and Apache on the south. In 1893 they numbered 507. In person, the Caddo are rather smaller and darker than the neighbor ing prairie tribes, and from their long residence in Louisiana, they have a considerable admixture of French blood. They are an agricultural tribe, raising large crops of corn, pumpkins and melons, and still retaining industrious habits in spite of their many vicissi tudes of fortune. They were never buffalo hunters until they came out on the plains. They formerly lived in conical grass houses like the Wichita, but are now in log houses and generally wear citizen's dress, excepting in the dance. The old custom which gave riso to tho name and tribal sign of "Pierced Nose," is now obsolete. In 180G, Sibley said: "They are brave, despise danger or death, and boast that they never shed white man's blood." Their former enemies, the prairie tribes, boar witness to their bravery, and their friendship toward the whites is a part ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1898

jMgwww imr.'" 48 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. cence; of vivifying sunlight, balmy zephyrs, and fragrant odors; of purling streamlets, blithesome bird-songs, bud ding leaflets, and daisypied meadows, has been dedicated to her whose ad vent in this sin dark world was the veritable springtime of humanity's hopes; whose incomparable grace and beauty of the Holy Spirit has suggested in the oft-repeated titles: "Flower of the field," "Lily of the valley," "Rose of the garden of Jerico." One of the most striking facts in connection with the development of Catholic devotion to Our Lady that is constantly going on from decade to decade and century to century a de velopment of which the special exercises of the present month furnish a salient instance, is a notable diminution in the insistence with which the old-time charge of Mariolatry is preferred against us by those outside the fold. It would seem that the more multiplied become the manifestations of our confiding love and engrossing veneration f...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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