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Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1904

STATE DAIRYMEN'S CONVENTION >• (Continued from Page 11.) ber of pounds of protein, fat, vege table sugar and water taken into a cow's stomach and by chewing cud is reassembled into casein, fat, sugar and water in milk, ready for delivery on demand. Surely writers or agrk cultural chemists do not mean to ad vocate a "balanced ration" theory of transmitting ingredients from food to animal product without animal assim ilation, for no such thing exists iiC nature. The theory of balanced ra" tions rests on the knowledge that when an animal consumes more o( one kind of food, as for example: A carbohydrate like sugar, than the sys tem can assimilate and make a part of itself, the unassimilated part is wasted, so far as nourishment is con: cerned. So the entire system of in vestigations has been to find how much of the two classes of food—pro tein and carbohydrate—animals can consume without waste in digestion and assimilation. The central fact in this matter is this: The theory of balan...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1904

16 limited to one species or whether it will affect more than one. Animal plagues, when considered from the point of view of control, may be divided into three classes, depend ing on the animals they affect. 1. Those plagues which affect only one species of animals, such as pleuro pneumonia, rinderpest, southern cat tle plague, and contagious keratitis in cattle, surra, influenza and maladie dv coit in horses, blackleg in calves and takosis in Angora goats. 2. Those which affect more than one species of animals and do not affect man; in this we would include hog cholera and swine plague in swine and distemper in dogs and coyotes. 3. This is the most important class and includes the plagues which af fect more than one species of ani mals and may also be found in man, and the following diseases form ex amples of this class: Glanders, a dis ease primarily affecting horses, but seen in mules, camels, dogs, guinea pigs, and in man. Anthrax, which to a great extent is found in sheep and c...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1904

PURE FOOD VIOLATIONS. State Dairy and Pure Food Commis sioner E. A. McDonald has prepared a statement showing the result of eleven prosecutions made by his office for food adulterations since September Ist. Of the prosecutions eight were for selling adulterated milk, all of which occurred in Seattle. The three other cases arose in Davenport, Ana cortes and Tacoma. A $25 fine was imposed upon Parks Bros. & Co. for selling adulterated honey at Davenport. Parks Bros. & Co. of San Francisco are given as the manufacturers. An analysis of the honey showed surcose, 4.6 per cent; direct polarization, plus 49.7 deg.; in direct polarization, @ 26 deg. C plus 43.7 deg., adulterated with glucose. A currant jelly sold by A. Marvin was analyzed as follows: Water, 25.45 per cent; sucrose, 22.53 per cent; ash, 0.83 per cent; reducing sugar (glu cose), 44.79 per cent; total solids, 74.55 per cent; direct polarization, plus 59.4 deg., indirect polarization, @ 19.8 C plus 56.0 deg, adulterated...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1904

18 POULTRY INTERESTS SEATTLE'S POULTRY SHOW. The Seattle Poultry Association held its annual show in the Armory from January 6th to 12th, and sur passed each of the preceding shows, both in number of birds exhibited and quality. There were about 750 en iries made and the competition was very i>.een. Almost every poultry fan cier in this county and in Pierce, as well as a great many from far outly ing points, were on hand. Represen tatives from Oregon and California were there; also a few from Idano. The largest number of any one breed were found in the Barred Plymouth Rocks, and they were so evenly matched that Judge Hinds found it a hard task to decide which were enti ,led to the prizes. It took him two days to do the judging. The attendance was fair, although not quite what the officers of the as sociation had hoped for. A lhtle more publicity would probably have brougut a large rattendance. The association is growing every year, and at each annual exhibit is trying to outdo pr...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1904

SCHOOL Of EXPERIENCE This department is by and for the sub scribers of The Ranch. Contributions of not over 300 wards are asked of all who have anything valuable and of practical utility to relate No definite subject is named, but it is desired that what is written for this de nartment be pertinent to farming conditions in the Northwest. All are at liberty to write and no restriction is placed on the number of articles you send in. For each accepted article credit will be given on our books for 30 cents, to be taken out in either subscription or advertising. Write on one side of the paper only, and always give your full name and address, though not neces sarily for publication if not desired by the correspondent. Manure and Loam. —Every one knows that it is important to spread manure upon soil of any kind, but few understand thoroughly the action of manure upon the soil. We say the soil is fertilized—but how? With an understanding of the action in com bination of nitrogen, phosphori...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1904

20 HEADQUARTERS =S t DAIRY MACHINERY AND SUPPLIES GENERAL AGENCY FOB TUBULAR CREAM SEPARATOR The only Tubular Bowl Separator on the market. The only light-running, Add to this: Large-capacity, heavy-cream, low-price, The only asy-to-wash, cleanest-of-skimming, and we have told our story. When you purchase a Separator, see that you get one that em- The on low-supply-can, bodies these qualifications. The Tubular is the only one that does. Over 1,200 of them now in use in the coast sec- "j^P'ULmi^. Are you aware of the fact that almost all of the Cream- #|F^fi|K^ '■■:i% ~~'ISSI^ think of them. We are the agents for this popular and up- jiT Clear Water White Sulp. Acid. Best Separator Oil. J^-~" „- Chr. Hanson's Preparations. . Printed Parchment Wrappers. "^^—^JM^ Lapham's Seamless Cheese Bandage. Hand Power Babcock Testers. —-^ --^ " Brushes of All Kinds. Gasoline Engines. ' j FULL LINE OF MILKMEN'S SUPPLIES. MAIL ORDERS A SPECIALTY. PROMPT SHIPMENT. GIVE US A TRIAL. ■ 1 k i * £> I ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1904

""^sS^^-^ SANDERS M^^wr^Jb T(/jV3i DISK PLOW... Simplest and Most Perfect Made. Before you give your order for a Disk Plow be sure to Examine the Sanders . For sale by THE OLD RELIABLE HOUSE OF Mitchell, Lewis & Stayer Co. PORTLAND, OREGON. Spokane Seattle Boise Salem Medford Send for Special Circular. .■..■..-- . ■ . ' ■ ' ■■ " /^&v Triple Daily Train Service \\ 1 Between VdJ^R/ Puget Sound Points and St. Paul, Minneapolis And All Points East. The "North Coast Limited." The most perfectly appointed trains on the Continent. Special Homeseekers 1 rate« via the Northern Pacific up to Nov. 30th. $25 from St. Paul. $35 from Chicago. Pullman and Tourist Cars. Dining and Observation Cars on every train. For rates, tickets and all information call on or write to I. A. NADEAU, A. D. CHARLTON, Genl. Agent, Seattle, Wn... A. G. P. A., Portland, Ore. ||| ■ "w^Cvi I^^^^h m B B £•'\ B^^fl Bifl i^^L it* B* IV* B B CHICKS RIGHT this year, and the right way to start them is to feed HOLLY CH...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1904

22 11 JJgB SEPARATOR I Hgjf] //*Wf! BIK. If you buy the right machine, I HH li*^£smW.JP& and there ls only on* rl Bnt ma * I I \l^^Pl DELAVAL H Wm Li\ CREAM SEPARATORS Q HSfl -.^^fcil* BK nffc Are used exclusively by every I S*£*3f:«lfcwZ^^B*^4 large and experienced creamery ■■ H ***s^^ and dairyman the world over. hh E^H ri^*^^^Ss^^Vl Profit by the experience of H9 iflQ ■P^T\*l "~*~ *^5- 400,000 farmers and equip, your BH BH J7 vi^^^Tß .v\ * ■ dairy with aDe Laval. Espe- ■■ PI El W ij \\ daily valuable In home dairy- BiS WKI M --■ §■ a Everything needed, in tht B^H m^H f i-^&i if "^- \) js dairy business carried by? us. HHh I^B |Uf^ I *^^ ■■i^fe'^Jl^^ We carry the largest stock of j^^p I^B \\iß \^ '^^v^ dairy supplies on the Pacific ■ '4|^ O^^^B^^ii P^- Coast. for the new twentieth K^ \ I Ig^i^*l "^^ Write for the new twentieth H^ fcjrk^i '**^ B^ Century Catalogue. li| ■ DE LAVAL DAIRY SUPPLY COMPANY I j^H 217-219 Drumm St., San Francisco, Cal. MB 65 Front St., Portland, Or...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1904

22 im^EVPI^^HHiIQIIHEHI ■ HEa ■■ EH '■ Ln Ifl ■ ■SB 4^fiEßlH9nlA If you buy the right machine, flfl BBP /£f^^T|ff*ffl and there Is only on* right ma I^B ■I \iMW% DELAVAL I Pa ]BK\ CREAM separators Q HB _-^^fc^Hl ft? ge^. Are used exclusively by every I fl^fl *rtfM P*r*rrTi«i large and experienced creamery HSB l^B and dairyman the world over. Bfl BBi j ~"~ '-^^SS^fSSf^' * 5 Profit by the experience of Hi MB IF\tSPr^ *"*r-- 400,000 farmers and equip your HI DH mr vlHrl ■VA dairy with aDe Laval. Espe- Pa BC ji // iIBF IJ , \\ ' daily valuable in home dairy- ■laS ■*■ // w jB \\ intr ■■■I §^B m jtffo. If «*i^~ \\ Everything needed in '} tht HB |3H if /^^. If- "^J^Oliii dairy business carried by us. Hfl ■■ JL^* *"'" ! I \/V di#* ' We carry the largest stock of |B| ■Hj *^\\ If ~ dairy supplies on the Pacific I p\ Coast. BH i s*^^ \^ LM^O- Write for the new twentieth W^ ||| X*M Century Catalogue. B|l ■ DE LAVAL DAIRY SUPPLY COMPANY I HH 217-219 Drumm St., San Francisco, Cal. ■■ BH 65 Front ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1904

Registered Shorthorns R * MILK STRAINS. John Lynch, Box 321, Pctaluma, Cal. — PUREBRED NORTH DEVON CATTLE Bred by L V McWHORTER & SONS, . North Yakima, Washington v«,,n<, stock For Sale. Satisfaction Guar- Y° anteed Correspondence Solicited. Springbrook farm R. F. .D. No. 1. Salem, Ore., 5 m. west, on Salem-Dallas Road. THOMAS W. BRUNK, Propr. GRAND VIEW FARM We are now offering 20 good registered Oxford Down Rams.' The splendid Berk shire Boar Plumper, winner of second prize in the under six months class at Toronto. Two extra good -Jersey cows. . < SHANNON BROS. Cloverdale, B. C. Meadowbrook Stock Farm Breeder of Registered Shorthorn Cat tle and Poland China Hogs. A few bags for sale. B. T. BYRNB, Moscow, Idaho. Purebred Berkshire Swine Prices Right. J. M. RICHARDSON, Wapato, Wash. A Mountainview Ranch \dS^MS^ Registered Jersey Cattle JtjMESiIHKBr the greatest milk and but ' M^H9^^BB| ter producers in the world. WSL Head of herd is Royal of Kbl. t Spokane, son of Royal Oi...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1904

Registered Shorthorns OIILK STRAINS. John Lynch, Box 321, Petaluma, Cal. PURE BRED NORTH DEVON CATTLE Bred by . L. V. McWHORTER & SONS, . North Yakima, Washington Young Stock For Sale. Satisfaction Guar anteed. Correspondence Solicited. „'; Springbrook Farm R. P. D. No. 1. Salem, Ore., 5 m. west, on Salem-Dallas .Road. THOMAS W. BRUNK, Propr. Cotswold Sheep; / Poland China Swine, Angora Goats • Barred P. R. Chickens. GRANDVIEW FARM We are now offering 20 good registered Oxford Down Rams.- The splendid Berk shire Boar Plumper, winner of second prize In the under six months class at Toronto. Two extra good ■■Jersey cows. ;.-»'-■. SHANNON BROS. Cloverdale, B. C. Meadowbrook Stock Farm ' Breeder of Registered Shorthorn Cat tle and Poland China Hogs. A few bags for sale. B. T. BYBNS, Moscow, Idaho. Purebred Berkshire Swine Prices. Right. J. M. RICHARDSON, Wapato, Wash. A j MountalnvlßW Ranch j^r^^TiMt Registered Jersey Cattle jMi W9 the greatest milk and but- HHjKPfIHHI ter producers...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1904

24 \ A Hand Separator \\J/ \/ That's Worth $2,000 V Endorsed and Sold by Hazelwood Creamery There's a reason for every thing. The Hazelwood Com pany is essentially in the creamery business. Because Hazelwood is in the creamery business it advocates the use of the hand separator as the most, economical, satisfactory and thorough process for ex tracting all the cream. It is to its interest as a creamery concern to have the best means used, both to satisfy the farm ers who ship the cream and its own creamery needs. It makes no difference to Hazelwood what separator it sells, so far as any compensa tion it receives is concerned. Indeed, Hazelwood has been offered and frequently is of fered more liberal and allur ing terms to handle other ma chine-; than the margin grunted For further particulars address the manufacturers, VERMONT FARM MACHINE CO., BELLOWS FALLS, VT., or any of their agencies in the Northwest — A. M. Ferrell, Everett, Wash.; the Hazelwood Cream Co., Portland, Ore., or Th...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1904

THE RANCH . VOL. XXI. NO. 3. SEATTLE, WASHINGTON, FEBRUARY 1, 1904. F. WALDEN, Associate Editor The Ranch. Subscriptions 50c. per Year.

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1904

2 School of Experience This department Is by and for the sub scribers of The Ranch. Contributions of not over 300 wards are asked of all who have anything valuable and of practical utility to relate. No definite subject is named, but it is desired that what is written for this de partment be pertinent to farming conditions in the Northwest. All are at liberty to write and no restriction is placed on the number of articles you send in. For each accepted article credit will be given on our books for 30 cents, to be taken out In either subscription or advertising. Write on one side of the paper only, and always give your full name and address, though not neces sarily for publication if not desired by the correspondent. Barbed Wire Fence. —Every rancher has had more or less experience with barbe wire fences —and much of it very unsatisfactory. The present style of fence is too destructive of livestock and a danger to human life. A fence built of smooth wire would be better, but it does ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1904

THE RANCH With which la consolidated The Washington Fanner, The Pacific Coast Dairyman, The Farmer and Dairyman, The Farmer and Turfman. Issued Ist and 15th of each month. PHIL. L. AXLING, Editob Associate Editors: F. Walden. H. L. Blanchard. MILLER FREEMAN - - Publisher Editorial Offices: Seattle, Wash. Tel. Main 1265—Long Distance Connection. BUSINESS OFFICES: Seattle, - - Third Floor Downs Building. Spokane, Alexander & Co., 521 First Aye. Subscription (in advance), one year, 50 cts.; six months, 30 cts. If on time, sub scription will be one dollar. Seattle sub scribers are required to pay $1 per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted in every town to solicit subscriptions. Good commission and sala ries paid. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be notified in writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot find it o...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1904

4 Horticultural* Notes By F. WALDEN. The meeting of the Northwest Fruit growers' Association in Portland, Ore., January 11-13, was a notable event for horticulture in this section of country. The meeting was more largely attend ed than usual. The territory included in the association embraces Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana and Brit ish Columbia. There was no one from Montana, so far as I know, but Idaho had a large representation. Southern Idaho was especially strong in its rep resentation. They came to get the next meeting in Boise and they did. Oregon was notably strong in attend ance. This was to be expected. There was but one fault to" be found with our Oregon brethren and that was that some of them semed to think they were the "whole thing." Prof. Clark, of Berkeley, California, was with us and rendered valuable assistance, as will be noted further on. * * * Dr. N. G. Blalock, the president of the association, could not be present. His place was filled by the first vice pre...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1904

on that apple. It began to spin its web but for some reason was not satis fled and then crawled to the blossom end but not being pleased with the situation, crawled to the stem end, then out the stem nearly to the limb and then back and finally returned to the spot of poison, finished its web and entered the apple at the side of the spot and was soon buried out of sight but was not poisoned. The time from its hatching to its entering the apple was an hour and three-quarters. Two days after the worm was found dead in the apple. After entering the apple it came back and enlarged the opening, got a grain of the poison and climbed the golden stairs. Such patient toil as that shown in the watching of this insect by Prof. Clarke is the foundation of all our suc cessful work in combating this most damaging of all insect pests. Beneficial Side of Pest Question. Read by F. Walden at the meeting of the Northwest Fruitgrowers' Asso ciation in Portland, Oregon, Jan. 13, 1904: The use of the wor...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1904

6 * Feeding Dairy Cows * Read at State Dairymen's Convention, North Yakima, by C. L. Smith. The modern dairy cow is the pro duct of evolution under the influence of care, feed and environment supple mented by careful selection, and by breeding in line, to fix and intensify characteristics. The history of dairying emphasizes the value and importance of these five factors in the development of the im proved dairy cow of today. In her natural condition, a cow gave milk sufficient to maintain the calf until it was mature enough to gather its own sustenance; about three to four months, yielding during this pe riod, from 2,000 to 3,000 pounds of milk. The calf was dropped at the time when the fresh spring grass furnished an abundance of succulent easily di gested food, and ceased at about the time that the food become less palat able and more difficult to masticate and digest. Under domestic influences a man or woman took the place of the calf and by demanding the last drop, twice in ever...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1904

poor in proteim it may be most eco nomically fed in connection with clo ver hay and a grain ration containing 30 per cent or more of the concen trated feeds that are rich in protein. If corn ensilage forms one-half or more of the forage ration, then the grain ration should be combined so as to have a ratio of about 1 to 5. The average cow, however, will hardly handle profitably more than one or two pounds per day of cottonseed, glu ten or linseed meal. The by-products of the flour mills —bran, shorts, mid dlings—are the most economical sources of supply for the major por tion of the grain ration for the north western dairymen. Some dairymen have made the mis take of accepting feeding standards and suggested combinations as pre scriptions to be taken according to di rections. Such feeders often meet with disappointment and charge their failure to errors of the chemist or ex perimenter who formulated the stand ard ration. So far as standard rations and nu tritive ratios are given for ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1904

8 fire fanged ensilage, would have to be given a wide allowance for waste. The palatability of the ration will have a material effect upon its value in use by the cow. The energy expended by the animal in the mastication and di gestion of some kinds of foods are esti mated to equal 25 per cent of its food energy. The dairy cow is a sensitive ma chine, used by the dairymen to manu facture grain and forage into milk. It requires, as has been shown, as much food to sustain the life of the cow as is used in the manufacture of 30 pounds of milk. Here appears the economy in feed ing each individual cow up to her ca pacity for manufacturing milk. As it takes just 50 per cent more food to make 30 pounds of milk from two cows, making 15 pounds each, than one cow making the 30 pounds, the profit of the dairyman always accruing from that measure of food which the cow turns into milk, the food of sup port is always chargeable to expense. DIGESTIBLE MATTER IN 100 POUNDS. Fat Dry Carbo- Eg. Carbo...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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