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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1985

MOUNTAIN RECIPES I recently ran across some old recipes for vegetables. It's easy to imagine that our grandmothers got just as tired of fixing the same food in the same ways as we do. At this time of year, we're looking forward to fresh garden vegetables in the spring and that makes canned and frozen foods dull. For a little change of pace, you might like to try some of the recipes several generations of cooks ago discovered . QUALITY LOG HOMES AT AFFORDABLE PRICES The Beautiful, Natural Way To Live \ THE SHAWNEE IMPROVED '"" "' " Doors "TUE BLUE RIDGE" * RLD 9E Beam and Snow Blocks OA' ca' i caa crt et i —i i.. R. . >. * Hardboard Splines * 1 H o,Nm<l I * Gasketin 9 OPTIONS: ?o e , d m 0 2!j'"i R °°* * Ten Inch Spikes • Log Gable Ends '" 1 • Blueprints 8 • Log Rafters For Main Building 30 TTI TEJ TSSHI • Four Hours of Building And Porch (See Lafayette Model) j EE Supervision • Storm Doors I BEDROOM 'ij BEDROOM 20^° M | /\ | j • Erection Crew information v-Jr #...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1985

PAGE 18 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1985 MOUNTAIN MEMORIES Continued from page 16. the world of. Once in singing school, I was picking at a girl and she slapped me. Boy! I grabbed her by the hair of the head and dragged her down between the benches. They said they were going to lock us up in a room together and I was hoping they would. I first met Creola at school, but then I didn't know she would become my wife. At that time I didn't know if I even liked her or not. A few years later, I saw Creola again and ask her for a date. The fellow with me ask for a date also, but I won out. I was engaged to someone else at the time. Yes Siree! That Creola was a pretty woman. Seven weeks later we were married. All the money I had was a ten dollar gold certificate that my mother had kept for me. The marriage license was $3-00. I gave the preacher a dollar and Lordy, we sure did need the other six dollars. We were between my Dad's house and the poor house, so to speak. We stayed with Daddy awhile...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1985

ELIZABETH'S JOURNAL The following is an excerpt from a journal kept by Elizabeth Cooley McClure of Carroll County, Virginia from 1842 (she was 17 then) until her death in 184$. Her journal not only reflects the day to day world she and her family lived in, but a young girl's hopes and expectations for the future. A special thanks to the Cooley family for sharing it with us. Feb. sth, 1844*. We have quilted Ma's quilt, picked some dead sheep wool and spun it and spun to make James shoe socks and knit them. Last Sunday was a week and me and Julian went to Coxes. I saw several persons there. Edy and Ruth Davis, Ben and Soloman came home with me and Soloman stayed all night. We sung a heap and I enjoyed myself uncommon well, and last Sunday Jeffery and Jestin come here. Last week I knit and piddled about. The weather was very bad. Today is a very bad day - hailing. James and Frank started to Carroll court. I have had a dreamy time for awhile... I know not what to do. I am as it is doing...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1985

PAGE 20 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1985 MISSING FINGERS Although my father Elmer Raby, now in his 70's, lives in Randleman, North Carolina, he spent most of his boyhood in Franklin. He often speaks fondly of those early years, recalling the quiet beauty of the region - incredibly clean air; mountains filled with rhododendron. But he also lets us know that, often, existance could be harsh and brutal. Last year at Christmas, as we opened lavish gifts, he described once again, as he does every year, the meagerness of his own childhood presents. "I received the same three things each Christmas," he told us, " - a new pair of overalls and always, in the stocking I hung by the fireplace, I'd find a single _ firecracker and an orange." On Christmas day, my father, wearing his stiff new overalls, would set off the firecracker and eat the pulp of the orange. The skin he'd save, savoring it several days later when it became dry and hard. But he adds, "Back then, those gifts seemed treasures." ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1985

WHENPENNIESMADE ADIFFERENCE A group of regulars were gathered around the stove in Mayberry Trading Post on a cold January afternoon swapping old tales and stories as usual. They included John Adkins, Burt Stanley, Dale Yeatts, Miss Addie Wood, myself and Jeanette Shelor and Raymond Shelor. Laughter could be heard as those gathered recalled an event that typified mountain folk's attitude toward a dollar or a penny as the case may be. Years ago, in the days before US 58 was paved, a fellow by the name of Sam Akers had a contract to haul the mail from Meadows of Dan to Stuart, Virginia, a distance of 16 or so miles. Each day Sam would pick up the mail at Meadows of Dan, then make a stop at the Vesta, Virginia Post Office, then deliver it all to the Stuart Post Office where he would pick up the mail for the top of the mountain and haul it back to first Vesta and then Meadows of Dan. Sounds like an easy job at first, but it starts sounding a lot more like work when you consider that Sam ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1985

PAGE 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, BACKROADS (Continued from page 24) f ,Jir ■> ' < -w' ■• ->vE - - J 3? v" -»■ <| *shb j» '*' The Mast General Store Annex, mile 08.1 in Valle Crucis, North Carolina. 105 in Boone, North Carolina. This intersection is approximately 7 miles north of the intersection of the Blue Ridge Parkway and US 321 (US 321 and 221 run together at this point) at Parkway Mile Post 291-9- The entire tour will cover 18. 6 miles and will require approximately one hour to complete. However, you may wish to allot more time to enjoy this scenic area. 00.0 From US 321, we will turn onto NC Route 105 and head toward Linville and Foscoe, North Carolina . Here we will turn right off of NC 105 onto NC Route 1112, toward Valle Crucis, North Carolina. The small mountain community of Valle Crucis was established as an Episcopal Mission in 1842. The name Valle Crucis means "Valley of the Cross" and was given to this valley because of two ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1985

BACKROADS Continued from page 22. are on display at Mabry Mill. 00.5 The old house on the left was the Vol Reynolds place. Our readers will recall hearing of Mr. Reynolds in stories written by John H. Yeatts which have appeared in past issues of The Mountain Laurel. 00.9 Here we will turn right and continue to follow state road 600. This portion of state road 600 was one of the first roads in this area and was known as the "Wildcat Road". 01.2 The farm on our left is the home of Miss Addie Wood. This property has been in Miss Addie's family for over 100 years and it was in this house that $3 year old Miss Addie was born. Miss Addie operates Mayberry Trading Post. 01.U Here we cross Round Meadow Creek. 01.9 At this stop sign we will turn right onto the Blue Ridge Parkway. 02.4 As we approach the bridge over Round Meadow Creek, there is a pull-over and parking spaces to our right. If you have time, we would recommend taking the short hiking trail which leads from this parking area to ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1985

fh V \& JV/ JOT/ V vLrjjl HEART OF THE BLUE RIDGE VXouniaM * Copyright 1984 Laurel Publications Inc. feb I r 985 ry J^aurel Monthly Journal of Mountain Life A self-guided monthly tour of Mountain Backroads PAGE 24 mountains never get to see the really pretty places that are hidden away on mountain back roads. As residents who love and appreciate a stream gurgling through a glade or a deer standing in a roadside meadow or an old weathered barn tucked away in a mountain hollow, our BACKROAD column allows us to share our favorite spots with you. This month's BACKROAD tour will be a little different than our past tours in that we will offer two short tours in separate areas of the Blue Ridge. Each area offers its own unique beauty for your enjoyment and relaxation. As usual, the underlined numbers at the beginning of each paragraph indicate the total number of miles traveled from our point of beginning to that point on our tour. Each tour will make a complete loop and return...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1985

MARCH 1985 Monthly Journal of Mountain Life TWO YEARS Well, it's Sunday night and tomorrow morning we'll be taking this issue to the printer. It's the twenty-fourth time that we've been through the process of writing, compiling, pasting-up, proofing and delivering to the printer the results of our monthly labor of love. Unlike the night before the first issue went to press, we'll not be staying up all night to get it ready. Every page is already completed except for page one where these words will be placed. The reason it's not already pasted-up and completed along with the rest is due to the difficulty we've been having in putting into words the way we feel about you, our readers. The reason for setting aside this page was to thank you for making The Mountain Laurel possible, but each time we've tried to put our feeling into words, the torrent of emotions have scrambled our thoughts into incoherent ramblings as witnessed by the countless crumpled scraps of paper lining the waste ba...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1985

PAGE 2 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MARCH, 1985 EARLY ROADS CONTROLLED DESTINIES It is difficult today to realize how much the Southwestern Virginia people were affected by the roads of the area in use 75 years ago. Two influences have changed the entire complexion of Floyd, Carroll, Patrick, Grayson and Franklin Counties in the past 50 years. First was the building of good roads. Secondly was the government subsidy on the application of lime and ground limestone to agricultural land. The amount hauled from Austinville alone would be equal to a mile or more of the Blue Ridge Mountains. As a result, what was at one time red clay, eroded and unproductive areas in these counties today is green, beautiful and attractive. It has all come about since 1935- The modernization of the county roads made it possible. Few people realize today how difficult travel was in the early 1900's. I cite two examples. Dr. B.M. Beckham, who founded the Ferrum Training School (now Ferrum College) in 1913, and later the ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1985

f A True Blue Offer: | i THE MOUNTAIN LAUREL I $ \ | Second Anniversary Special! | Only $ 15.00 (Save $3.00) will send 3of your friends a ! | whole year of reading pleasure! With each Gift Sub j | scription, we'll send an original design Mountain Laurel ! | card, plus we'll send a FREE complimentary copy j ! to 3 more of your friends. I \ \ I Tellu, the occ„sion<Happy Birthday, Send y ollr Ch , ck 0r Money Order To J Anniversary, lhinkingof You, Oet well \ v c i i •* * i, i • . i Mountain Laurcss . £ .Soon ) and we will send the appropriate card. 0 (If you do not wish to cut the form out of your Meadows of Dan, ¥a. 24120 | | Mountain Laurel, just send in the names and addresses 1 on a separate i \ sheet of paper) SEND A GIFT FROri THE HEART THAT LASTS ALL YEAR. \ \ "THE HEART OF THE BLUE RIDGE" | | SEND GIFT SUBSCRIPTION TO: SEND COMPLIMENTARY COPY TO: f $ NAME \ NAME \ * I \ \ ADDRESS V ADDRESS $ i ! ? C ITY $ CITY \ i t $ \ STATE ZIP $ STATE ZIP > * i -J \ SE...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1985

PAGE 4 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MARCH, 1985 EARLY ROADS Continued from page 2. At that time, another uncle, Dr. Thomas H. Worrell had completed his M.D. education and training and had returned home to begin his medical practice in 1914. He had built a new house on my grandfather's farm. He had bought two horses to ride in his medical practice because frequently he would complete one call only to have to attend another. By 1916, he decided to get rid of the horses and buy a Ford Roadster. He then let his patients know that he would drive his car as far as he could and they would have to bring him a horse to ride the rest of the way. This did not work out and he had to buy another horse to ride where his car could not travel. On one occasion, his car stopped in the middle of a creek and he could not re-start it. He got my uncle Ed to bring a horse to pull the car about a mile back to the house until he could get a mechanic to come from Galax or Hillsville to fix it. My uncle Ed let his son Edd...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1985

IN MYSTERIOUS WAYS Mammie was into her 60 1 s and religion with the same amount of irreversible dedication. Each day she would follow a path into the woods behind her home and there she would pray with a display of vocal magnitude that those more irreverent souls in the community said was a sure sign that Mammie thought God was nearly deaf. Her 5 foot, 200 pound frame could belt out a sound that would have been the envy of a lighthouse foghorn, but to those who knew her, her faith and devotion were never questioned. Her husband Jess was a good man, but I always suspicioned his faith was a little bit shy of the accoustical strength of Mammie's. Deep down I wondered if Jess didn't insist on Mammie hitting the woods to pray since it threatened to weaken the structural strength of their small frame house in the way certain high pitched sounds shatter champagne glasses. If so, it surely only added to her determination to get a little louder so 1 s Jess wouldn'*t miss out on any important...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1985

PAGE 6 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MARCH, 1985 MAMA'S NOT THERE ANYMORE © COPYRIGHT 1985 While deciding upon a paperback at the airport newstand, I found myself rejecting those with flashy covers, thinking "No, Mama might not like that." Later on the plane, I ordered a vodka tonic instead of the usual Scotch and water, thinking "Mama is less likely to notice." But then I would remember, "No - Mama's not there anymore." My husband and I were en route to Roanoke to attend the funeral of his mother. Now none of the four daughters-in-law would need to hide from her again these little imperfections we knew would distress her. We had hidden these little things through the years because we did not want to be less than she believed us to be. Duplicity perhaps, but also love. We four recognized that our husbands' mother was of that "other" generation, and we respected those conventions that had guided her life. Her philosophy was that of kindness and service to her family, a kind of personal commitment ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1985

MAMA'S NOT THERE ANYMORE Continued from page 6. by rural living. There, in a white frame house without running water, they raised their four sons. Pop worked in town, so Mama and the boys were responsible for the corn, the fruit trees, the hogs raised for meat, the milk and the butter, and for the wild blackberries they picked and sold "on the market". Those were the years when she would cook in quanities of two or three chickens, four pies, and huge pans of biscuits per meal. Later the boys went away to war, and, thank God, there were no Gold Stars in the window, and only one Purple Heart to be put away in a drawer. War-time prosperity brought them a brick house which they built down close to the road, and which included the much-awaited convenience of an electric range and central heat. The boys' married, two moving away to distant states, while the other two stayed just a few minutes away. Eight grandchildren and three great-grand-children were born, and now we had. begun our jou...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1985

PAGE 8 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MARCH, 1985 LIFE SURE CAN BE "INTOXICATING" Within the span of my memory (and this encompasses more years than I like to admit), I have watched the passing of many activities and traditions that once played an important part in our daily lives. And none among these has been a sadder loss than the rapidly disappearing art of good conversation. To me, it's a tragic irony that the more sophisticated our communication systems have become, the less we seem able to convey our thoughts and emotions to others. While I realize no single factor brought on this situation, I still lay a lot of the blame to that insatiable devourer of time - television. Now, before you start thinking that I'm condemning all T.V., I will assure you I am not. There are a few programs I thoroughly enjoy. What I'm really lamenting is the negative effect it, along with other influences, has had on our former feelings of closeness and sharing. The friendly gatherings that once were such a vibran...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1985

"INTOXICATING" Continued from page 8. barn, Jeter discovered that he needed a new part to replace something that had broken. Not wanting to interrupt his work by personally doing this chore, he dispatched his helper, on foot, down to the corner garage to get the part. This errand should have been accomplished in about thirty minutes and it' s understandable why Jeter was getting pretty impatient after more than two hours elapsed with no sight of his helper or the part. Then, just about the time Jeter was getting ready to go look for him, his helper made a wobbly appearance around the corner of the barn. His steps were completely uncoordinated, he would pitch forward for a step or two, lose his balance and run backward for about the same distance. At the same time his eyes seemed determined to focus independently in opposite directions. To ask what he had been up to would have been useless, his physical condition betrayed that fact. His explanation, however, was a classic study in pu...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1985

PAGE 10 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MARCH, 1985 The following is an excerpt from a journal kept by Elizabeth Cooley McClure of Carroll County, Virginia from 1842 (she was 17 then) until her death in Her journal not only reflects the day to day world she and her family lived in, but a young girl's hopes and expectations for the future. A special thanks to the Cooley family for sharing it with us. This month we will print excerpts from several different monthly entries showing her acquaintance with James McClure ripening into romance The year is 1845 and Elizabeth is now 20 years old. March 19th, 1845- Last Friday evening Caroline D. came here and Saturday Amanda and me and her went to Hillsville to meeting. I expect James [her brother] and James McClure will come home with them [Amanda and Julian, her sisters] March 19th, 1845- Today Amanda and Julian [her sisters] has gone to Burcham's to meeting..l expect James [her brother] and James McClure will come home with them, James to stay, Mc to take...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1985

From Grayson Avenue in Waynesboro, Virginia to the Waynesboro Nursery near Lyndhurst is a long way to ride a bicycle and then work ten hours before riding home again. I was working at the Waynesboro Nursery in June of 1941 for a dollar a day trying to save enough money to pay for my school clothes and supplies for the fall, but after I received my first week's pay of six dollars, I knew I couldn't save enough money to make any difference. By the time I bought my brown bag lunch and paid for my bicycle repairs, there was very little money left to save. I wouldn't quit my job though, at least I had a job while most of my friends were still looking. My five feet-ten inches of height and 165 pounds had allowed me to pass as eighteen in order to get this job, but the fact that I hadn't worn boy size clothes for the last two years was a financial disadvantage. I was dragging a burlap sack filled with straw to kneel on as I stripped suckers off of the young peach tree stumps at the Nursery...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1985

PAGE 12 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MARCH, 1985 The Mail Box Dear Editor, Enclosed is a money order for a subscription to your wonderful magazine for my mother-in-law. It is a renewal. I gave her one last year for her birthday. She enjoys it so much. She is from Ashe County, North Carolina. Her maiden name was Worley and she married a Worley from Mountain City ; Tennessee. She loves to go back and visit her homeplace in Todd, N.C. Her mother used to fix chocolate gravy and I have fixed it from a recipe my mother-in-law uses. You have probably never heard of it, but the children have always loved it. D. Worley Lexington, N.C. Dear Mrs. Worley, No, I haven't ever heard of chocolate gravy, but I would love to have the recipe and try it. If you send it in, I'll print it and share it with our readers. Susan Thigpen, Editor Dear Mountain Laurel Editors, My husband said for me to order your paper again this next year for my dear friend of over 30 years in Ohio and for myself for New Year's gifts. She ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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