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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1990

May 1990 All May: National Egg Month, featuring promotions for children and restaurants, along with support from Gov. L. Douglas Wilder. Contact Cecilia Glembocki, 703-790-1984. May 9-12: Bonnie Blue National Horse Show, Virginia Horse Center, Lexington. Call 703-463-2194. May 9: Area 7 Virginia Extension Homemakers meeting, Northern Virginia 4-H Educational Center, Front Royal. Contact Dorothy Russell, 703-226-5300. May 9-11: Southern Regional Aquaculture Information Exchange Group meeting, Virginia State University, Petersburg. Contact Dr. Brian Nerrie at 804-524-5903. May 12: 4-H Day at Kings Dominion, Dos well Contact Rudolph Powell, 4-H youth specialist, Virginia State University, 804-524-5964. May 12: Yearling Performance Tfested Ram Sale, Shenandoah Valley Agricultural Experiment Station, Steeles Tavern. Contact Steven Umberger, Virginia Tfech, 703-231-9159. May 13-19: Elderhostel on horticulture, Donaldson Brown Center for Continuing Education, Virginia Tfech. Contact Paul S...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1990

8 S ■ lv W/inHnnniiv jh ; ' . tBM&.: |J|g| w MHT f v 8 jig Hi * "' -' # Ik. A 49 ■Blip ' June 1,1990. Just Another Day For Some. A Brand New Day For %/ Thousands Of Virginians. Virginia Farm Bureau Health Care Program coverage will begin for thousands of Virginians on June 1,1990. Also, on that day the Farm Bureau Program introduces Baby Benefits SM to members enrolled in family coverage. Baby Benefits is a prenatal, preventive care program designed to identify women at high risk for premature delivery. Through health education, risk assessment and encouraging expectant mothers to seek early medical care during pregnancy, Baby Benefits can help reduce the risk of premature birth and give babies a better chance to be born healthy. The new Baby Benefits program is only one of many attractive features of Farm Bureau Pro- FARM BUREAU NEWS gram protection. Other important advantages include: • Affordable monthly rates • Efficient, convenient local service at county Farm Burea...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1990

May 1990 EtL aMI, . .. Jlwbli - \ R|i9LX ,i_. , #• WtilFl jmf ■»' : Cotton acreage is up in the state. More planting predicted, including cotton By NORM HYDE VFBF Staff Writer RlCHMOND—Virginia farmers intend to raise more of all major field crops except soybeans this year, according to a planting report from the Virginia Agricultural Statistics Service. Corn plantings are expected to reach 530,000 acres, or 4 percent more than last year. Peanut growers intend to plant 95,000 acres, or 3 percent more than a year ago, while tobacco plantings will reach 52,290 acres, or 5 percent more than 1989. Cotton acreage is also up at 5,000 acres, a whopping 85 percent more than 1989. Cotton is making a steady comeback in Virginia after eradication of its number-one threat, the boll weevil. One of the new areas where cotton is being planted this year is Southampton County. "It's been years since cotton's been grown around here," said James Sawyer, Southampton County Cooperative Extension agent. ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1990

10 Mixing dogwoods offers year-round color, interest GARDENING THE DOMINION By Ellen Silva As I write this column in the Shenandoah Valley, the flowering dogwood trees are just beginning to open their buds. Last summer's frequent rains encouraged heavy bud set, and I have every reason to believe that this year's show will be as beautiful as last year's. That wish may be a bit greedy, but it is possible to have some sort of display from dogwoods throughout the year. All we need do is extend our view to include some other species of this adaptable genus. Cornelian cherry (Cornus mas) opens its small but abundant yellow flowers in March, even earlier than flowering dogwood. The display is lovely, though not as showy as some of the other dogwoods. As a bonus, the fruit that follows the flower is not only a colorful red, but is edible and tasty. Cornelian cherry trees tend to be more like multi-stemmed shrubs. With pruning it is possible to maintain this plant as a Farmer depends on lend...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1990

May 1990 REGISTERED ANGUS BULLS—Ranging from 9 months to 1% years of age. Priced from $700 to $1750. Sire and Dam information is available. Holly Hill Farm Corp. (804) 644-0717, (804) 633-7527 or (804) 633-5831. WANTED—FARM OR PASTURE FOR BEEF CATTLE. Spotsylvania or Orange County. Cal after 6:00 p.m. (703) 399-1208. REGISTERED ANGUS BULL—Born 10/03/84. 1800± bs. Very gentle! DAM, Excursion Blackcap; SIRE, Progession. Frank Stone, Ashland, Va. (804) 288-9000 or (804) 798-6477. WANTED—FARM OR PASTURE FOR BEEF CATTLE. Culpeper or Madison County. Call after 6:00 p.m. (703) 399-1208. 5 REAL NICE REGISTERED ANGUS HEIFERS— Ideal herd builders. Performance breeding. $500 each. Phone (804) 823-4900. REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORD BULLS— Mostly yearlings and a few two year olds. (804)469-7851. REGISTERED POLLED SHORTHORN BULL—And four registered bred heifers. Tazewell County. CaH (703) 988-9654. 20 HOLSTEIN STEERS—4OO to 500 pounds. De-homed and wormed. On grass. Cal Vivian Evans (703) 682-4457....

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1990

Proven Protection. Resardless of your needs: From auto, home and life insurance, to specialized coverase... give us a call for prompt, personal attention. Farm Bureau Insurance... Helping You Is What We Do Best. r —^ FARM I BUREAU VIRGINIA VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY EARLY SETTLERS INSURANCE COMPANY SOUTHERN FARM BUREAU LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY SOUTHERN FARM BUREAU ANNUITY INSURANCE COMPANY 200 W. GRACE ST., RICHMOND, VA 23261 804-788-1 234

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1990

H flHfc I H «■ Hifl WMM I W — __ I I Z I |B fl J| ■ |H M| H W* H |H ■ B» jg \ft>J. 49, No. 6 Are Americans ready for national health insurance? By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON VFBF Editor The United States, Canada and the United Kingdom are all looking at each other's health systems as they search for the best prescription to cure rising health care costs. Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's Rural Health Committee explored all three countries' systems, May 14, with James A. Slabaugh, a consultant for William M. Mercer Inc. In the United States, there are 37 million people without health insurance. "They aren't being left on the street; they are being admitted to hospitals and given basic care," said Slabaugh. The problem is that the cost is built into insurance rates paid by other patients. Meanwhile, hospitals cannot continue to serve the uninsured as more and more show up on their doorsteps. And these people are turning to a government that is trying to lower a federal deficit, he...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1990

2 Farm Bureau members can be marijuana watchdogs Over the past two years, 155,000 marijuana plants with a street value of $156 million have been confiscated in Virginia by law enforcement officers. In 1988, marijuana eradication efforts yielded 134,000 plants, the highest number in the six-year history of a team project called the Marijuana Eradication Program. The program is successful, thanks to the joint effort of the Virginia Department of State Police, the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, the Virginia National Guard and other law enforcement agencies. It's obvious how law enforcement agencies fight the drug problem, but Farm Bureau fights the spread through education. Farm Bureau makes its members observant. A brochure developed by the VFBF and State Police and soon available in county Farm Bureau offices tells farmers how to spot marijuana and what to do if it is found. Here are some pointers from the brochure: How and where does growing take place? Marijuana is grown in Virgi...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1990

June 1990 Reason shelved in wetlands nightmare By JOHN FULTON LEWIS Guest Editorialist The so-called environmental movement—as popularly understood, a horrible misnomer for a minority of sometimes dedicated, always purposeful activists determined to change the world into their image and augmented by all the rest of us with good intentions—has persuaded susceptible and often ill-informed bureaucrats and politicians at every level that nothing definable as "wetland" may be altered. The president of the United States, in fulfillment of a hastily contrived campaign pledge in 1988, shelved common sense completely by insisting that there be "no net loss" of wetlands at any place, in any time, for any reason. Man and the elements have been manipulating and altering this planet of Earth, for better and worse, since its "bang" beginnings—sometimes for good reason and sometimes for no reason. For every acre retrieved from watery origins, untold acres have been "lost" for eons of changing temp...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1990

4 Mark your calendar June 7: 15th Annual Virginia Forestry and Wildlife Spring Bus Tbur, Harrisonburg. Emphasis on Best Management Practices and Wildlife. Contact Dr. Harry Haney, Virginia Tfech, 703-231-5212. June 7: Raspberry Workshop and Field Day, Southern Piedmont Agricultural Experiment Station, Blackstone. Contact Skip Jubb, Virginia Ifech, 703-231-6336. June 9-10: Virginia Horse TVials, Virginia Horse Center, Lexington. Call 703-463-7060 or 703-463-2194. June 9-10: Virginia Minature Horse Classic, Virginia Horse Center, Lexington. Call 703-463-7060 or 703-463-2194. June 13: Virginia Pork Festival, Ruritan Festival Grounds, Emporia. Contact Bobby Flippen at 804-634-6611. June 14:15 th Annual Virginia Forestry and Wildlife Spring Bus Tbur, Reynolds Homestead-Patrick County area. Emphasis on managing upland PineHardwood stands. Contact Dr. Harry Haney, Virginia Ifech, 703-231-5212. June 15-16: Eastern Stud Ram Show and Sheep Sale, Augusta Expoland, Fishersville. Contact Steve U...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1990

June 1990 Impatiens anxious to grow, bloom and please gardener GARDENING THE DOMINION By Ellen Silva With all the patient waiting gardeners do, for seeds to sprout, plants to grow, acorns to become mighty oaks, it is a relief to find a recommendation for impatience for a change Impatiens, also known as Busy Lizzies, are just the thing you need to liven up those shady corners of your yard. Poetic license in spelling aside impatiens live up to their name They grow quickly into plants up to two feet across and as high, literally covered with blooms from early summer until frost. Impatiens have a color spectrum from a lilac blue to pinks, reds, salmons and orange Whites and blossoms with contrasting colors are also available Search for special Young Farmers is on Tomorrow s HARVEST Steve Wolfe State YF Chairman The grand prize for this year's state Young Farmer of the Year will be a Honda four-wheeler. The winner also will receive expense paid trips to the 1991 American Farm Bureau Conf...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1990

6 Farm Bureau is your voice Farm Bureau policy is your policy! The policy development process begins July in counties across the state. lb help your county Farm Bureau develop policies on issues that affect you, take a few minutes to look over these issues of importance to agriculture. The following questions pertain to such vital topics as agricultural research, biotechnology, import quotas, land use, zoning, and many others that affect farmers in indirect ways. Your needs and opinions will be considered in forming policies that are voiced in Virginia's General Assembly and in Washington. • Answer only those questions that concern you. • Check or fill in answers where appropriate. Number and write longer answers on a separate sheet of paper. • Mail or take your responses to your county Farm Bureau office by June 30. Policy Development Calendar July 19-August 2—District Policy Development Meetings July-September—County Resolutions Committee Meetings July-October—County Annual Meetin...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1990

June 1990 Ed members' opinions by June 30 Education 27. Do you support local option for the election of school board members? □ Yes □ No 28. Should localities be required to provide public transportation for non-public school students? □ Yes □ No Labor 29. Should employee benefits be expanded for migrant and seasonal farmworkers? □ Yes □ No 30. Should an exemption exist in Virginia's law from migrant worker housing inspections for employers of less than 500 man-days of labor as provided by federal law? □ Yes □ No 31. What should we do about harassment from the Legal Services Corporation? 32. Should children under age 14 continue to be allowed to work in agriculture with parental consent? □ Yes □ No Land Use Planning and Zoning 33. Do you generally support planning and zoning to ensure proper land use? □ Yes □ No 34. Is our current Land Use Assessment and Taxation Law an effective tool for land preservation? □ Yes □ No 35. Do you support the current classifications for the land use a...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1990

8 'We care about food safety' Our nation is blessed with a fresh, nutritious and low cost supply of fruits and vegetables. This supply of food contributes significantly to improved health in our country. Our produce is grown using a variety of farming practices, sometimes including the use of farm chemicals to control insects, diseases and weeds. Yet, most consumers are unfamiliar with why and how these problems are controlled and often ask, "Is our food safe to eat?" We, as farmers, need to make the general public more aware of our farming practiceshow we limit the use of pesticides, rotate crops, conduct tissue analysis and soil tests to determine what nutrients our soil needs and support biotechnology to provide disease and pest-resistant plants, safer chemicals and self-fertilizing plants. Now, more than ever, the American public wants to hear from the farmer, not to be reassured or stroked. The public wants to know just what we are doing to ensure the safety of our food supply....

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1990

June 1990 Farm bill over budget WASHINGTON—The chairman of the House Agriculture Committee warned members May 2 that their proposed legislation for the 1990 Farm Bill is $13 billion over budget for the next five years and said hard choices must be made by the full committee. "We're in a very difficult situation, having promised policies that we have no money for," said Rep. Kika de la Garza, D-Tfexas. Chairman de la Garza said the committee had a duty to the American people to keep spending under control. Under a House budget compromise recently approved, $800 million in farm program spending must be cut from the 1991 fiscal budget and millions more in coming years. Budget and foreign trade disputes, combined with re-election worries, have some congressmen talking about simply extending the 1985 Farm Bill another year. Secretary of Agriculture Clayton Yeutter said his department is prepared to do so if required, but he said environmentalists are likely to press for passage of a farm...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1990

10 Water laws are called false promise RICHMOND—The 1989 General Assembly basically ducked the issue of how to divide the state's water resources during the next drought, says the director of the Virginia Water Resources Research Center. William Walker believes a package of five water rights bills passed last year only solved non-controversial problems. Farmers, businesses, municipalities and wildlife all compete for water during a drought, and it's essential the legislature draft a comprehensive statewide water use plan before the next dry spell, he said. "The disadvantage I see with crisis-type legislation is it's piecemeal. It never looks far enough into the future," Walker told the 25th Annual Virginia Water Resources Conference April 24. The Water Resources Center's proposal for a statewide plan calls for an end to the doctrine of riparian water rights, where property owners are entitled to all the water they need from water sources they own. Walker said political power will sh...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1990

June 1990 REGISTERED BEEFMASTER YEARLING BULLS— Cow-half pairs. Some U Grade Animals. Cal Vivian Evans at (703) 682-4457. REGISTERED ANGUS BULL—Son of Pine Drive Big Sky, calved 10-10-85. Excelent temperament, $2POO. Phone (804) 598-4066, Powhatan, Va. rIGISTERED PUREBRED PINZGAUER BULL— Born 10-24-88, ready for service. Cal Robert Stung* at (703) 386-9355. Hiltons, Va. REGISTERED ANGUS BULLS—I 2 to 15 months old. AHIR records. Cal (703) 228-8496 or 2881. ANGUS BULLS—I 4 Reg. Angus buls—rent or sel. Graperidge Farm, Goochland, Va. 23063. CaH 556-4212. 10 REGISTERED ANGUS BULLS—WiI RENT or SELL. $675 and up. Graperidge Farm, Box 115, Goochland, Va. 23063. REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORDS—Cedar Lane Farm, Victoria, Va. (804) 696-3721. 5 GELBVEH BULLS—Registered, poled, black, red, good blood lines, breeding age. Bill Walker, (703) 483-9644. REGISTERED ANGUS BULL—Dam; Excursion Blackcap, Sire; Progression. Bom 10-03-84.1800 bs. Very gentle. $1200. (804) 288-9000. Ashland, Va. SFEEMALE BLACK...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1990

V'< .w: ~- ' -■ ' ■■ '-■ , : ,*,T -•, ' :- : TT # # # • - • rarm fjurcsu ■ • -•■ Home Insurance* __ Y V " w v.. i % i" i wi. » .. ———— 11., i .111 Vbi. 49, No. 6 THE VOICE OF VRGMA'S AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS June 1990 - /-V g Focusing on Earth Earth Day I, April 22, wae a time to celebrate i . i J I m iljuLij 1 <i I Brw muTjil i ana team ai recnmonQ a Maymorn rani, oeverv year-old Caitfei Mar iwilny of Mkflothlan and other chlckwi rocked atop an air-filed globe. A booth designed by the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Women's Committee attracted many visitors Interested In how farmers produce safe, qualty food Mid protect the environment. Mbig the fanner's story In the afternoon were Goochland Cowty members Ruth Denham (cantor) and Jane White, county women's chaferman. Samplng the peanuts and Iterative (left) was Fred Denham. Hanover County women answered visitors' questions eerier in the day. VFBF Women's Chairman Helen Neese explains why some consumers question ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1990

Farm Bureau Vol. 49, No. 7 BBflß it $$ ' "fe&iv -■■»« " M| J9E IMtfflHß.^ ' ria •>* :?> ''" Chemists from Laidlaw Environmental Services packed leftover farm chemicals for disposal during the first day of a pilot pesticide cleanup June 12. Farmers' sheds free of old chemicals By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON VFBF Editor RICHMOND—Farmers in three selected counties recently got rid of 14,510 pounds and 826 gallons of outdated, banned, unwanted and unusable pesticidessome of which had been stored since the 19405. A "pesticide run" was made to farms in neighboring Frederick and Clarke counties beginning June 12 and in Northumberland County beginning June 19 to collect the toxic materials for proper disposal. Dubbed Clean Day, the pilot project cost the state $106,000 and gave officials information on the cost and how to plan and conduct a statewide collection if one is adopted. A report on the Pesticide Control Board's tried collection will be given to the Genera...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1990

2 Chemicals keep consumer costs down, research says Newspapers today are filled with articles about farm chemical use and other alleged food problems. Television news reports provide the same unbalanced viewpoints. Uninformed politicians, musicians and movie stars condemn the farm community. Thus, our nation's hysteria over the food supply is at an all-time high. It shouldn't be. American food produced on the farm today is the safest it's ever been, and it's the healthiest, most wholesome supply on the planet. Still, consumer groups and environmentalists argue that farm chemicals are unnecessary. Well, they don't think the thing through. The costs society would have to pay for eliminating the farm use of agricultural chemicals would include higher food prices, reduced farm product exports, reduced food security and increased soil erosion, according to a study conducted recently at Tfexas A&M University. More than 140 crop production specialists and economists nationwide,...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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