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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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A NOVEL RAZOR STROP. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

A NOVEL RAZOR STROP.     There are not many men who shave themselves who know how to strop a razor properly. The difficulty of ascertaining the "knack" has led many a man, after providing himself at con- siderable expense with all the needful "tackle," to abandon a toilet process beset with danger, and to revert to the tender mercies of the bar- ber. With the contrivance illustrated herewith, no one need plead inability to strop a razor. It is claimed for it that it will put a keen edge on any kind of razor in a few seconds. The veriest neophyte can use it with a certainty of sharpen- ing the razor, and at the least possible risk of cutting the strop. To guard against the latter contingency, all that is necessary is to see that the handle is kept in a horizontal position (as shown), and that nothing interferes with the handle rocking freely from side to side as the ends of the strop are pulled gently, and, of course, alternately, in front of the blade. Half...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BURIED THE CAT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

BURIED THE CAT.   Uncle John: "Are you still quarrelling with your neighbor because his cat dined on your canary?" The Niece: "Oh, no; that is all over long ag0." "Well, I'm glad to hear you finally buried the hatchet." "But we didn't bury the hatchet. Uncle John; we buried the cat."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LORD ROBERTS AND THE WAR OFFICE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

LORD ROBERTS AND THE WAR   OFFICE.   The London correspondent of the "New York Herald" is reported to have cabled to that jour- nal—"l hear on the highest authority that more   friction than ever prevails in the War Office. It   is now almost certain that Lord Roberts will re- sign his post as Commander-in-Chief next April, and will not, therefore, take any prominent part in the Coronation ceremonies. "There is a considerable amount of grumbling at his continued absence from Pall Mall, where, I hear, an enormous batch of papers is lying un- answered by him. Only the other day an appli- cation was made by Sir Evelyn Wood for another aide-de-camp, but, as the Commander-in-Chief was not present, Mr. Brodrick took it upon him- self to answer, and gave a rather curt refusal."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
What Women Like. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

What Women Like. "The pretty things that most women like are difficult to name," writes Hutchine Hapgood in "Ainslee's," "for their name, to use a phrase as trite as the undoubted truth of the fact, is legion. One woman of my acquaintance is fond of Java sparrows. She won't have anything about the house but Java sparrows. She likes her husband mainly because the color of his eyes is like the predominating tint in the wing of the Java spar- row. She likes the name 'Java,' and she likes the sparrow, and she simply dotes on the combina- tion.   "It is well known that some women admire kittens. They belong to the pretty class, are soft and decorative, like gum and magnesia. Cor- responding to the pretty kitten is the ugly pug. It is a close race between them in the matter of affection, with, I believe, the pug slightly in the lead, for, other things being equal, the ugly is a stronger card than the pretty in the game for a female's affection. The pug is small, awkward, path...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
England and America. GROWING FRIENDSHIP. STRONG SPEECH BY MR. HAY. THE POLICY IN THE PACIFIC. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

England and America.   GROWING FRIENDSHIP. —*— STRONG SPEECH BY MR. HAY. THE POLICY IN THE PACIFIC. At the annual dinner of the New York Chamber   of Commerce at Delmonico's, on November 19,   the reply to the toast, "Our Diplomacy," origin-   ly assigned to Mr. M'Kinley, was responded to by Mr. Hay, Secretary of State. Addressing the company, Mr. Hay, after a glowing eulogy of the   late President, dwelt upon foreign policy.   He said: "It may be another instance of that   naive credulity with which I have often been   charged by European critics when I say, I really   believe, that the world has moved onward in di-   plomacy as in many other matters. The briefest   expression of our rule of conduct is, perhaps, the   Monroe doctrine, and the golden rule. With this simple chart we can hardly go wrong. I think I   ma...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Ships in War Paint. WHAT SHOULD BE THE COLOR? TO RENDER THEM LEAST VISIBLE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

Ships in War Paint. WHAT SHOULD BE THE COLOR? —»— TO RENDER THEM LEAST VISIBLE. There is a considerable difference of opinion in Great Britain just now as to which color will render men-of-war least conspicuous, but no definite decision has yet been arrived at, though the matter has lately received special atten- tion. Hitherto the ships of the British Navy have usually been painted black and white, but the yellow shade of khaki, used by the French, has now been adopted by some ships, and meets with approval, though it does not seem to bear much similarity to its probable background, except in the case of cruisers lying close to the shore. The experience of South Africa has shown us the importance of forecasting the course of an action fought under modern conditions, of which none are more revolutionary than the increased distances at which engagements will take place. It seems certain that the first shots will be fired at upwards of seven thousand yards, and, fur- ther, that the sh...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DOOLEY ON THE NEGRO. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

DOOLEY ON THE NEGRO. Mr. Dooley, the national humorist of the Uni- ted States, has been saying some funny things about the greatly talked of White House dinner when the negro Booker Washington sat down to a meal with Mr. Roosevelt. "I didn't hear," says he, "that th' guest done annything wrong at th' table. Fr'm all I can larn he hung his hat on th' rack an' used proper discrimination between th' knife an' th' fork an' ast f'r nawthin' that had to be sint out f'r. There was no mark on th' table cloth where his hands rested, an' an inventory iv th' spoons after his departure showed that be had used gintlemanly resthraint."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
STATESMEN WHO HIDE THEMSELVES. TRICKS WELL-KNOWN MEN HAVE OF CONCEALING THEIR IDENTITY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

STATESMEN WHO HIDE THEM- SELVES. TRICKS WELL-KNOWN MEN HAVE OF CONCEALING THEIR IDENTITY. Lord Salisbury, who, as usual, went this year   to Beaulieu, in the South of Prance (where   he has a favorite chateau) for his autumn holi-   day, found on arrival that the municipality had,   doubtless out of compliment to the distinguished   visitor, named the road leading to his lordship's   residence Avenue Salisbury. This delicate at-   tention evidently did not meet with the entire   approval of the British Prime Minister, for he   is said to have requested the Mayor of Beaulieu     to alter or remove the name. The incident only   goes to strengthen the already prevailing im-   pression that the Premier has a strong dislike   for publicity when publicity is not necessary   or beneficial in any pa...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MEWS LIKE A CAT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

MEWS LIKE A CAT. One of the North American thrushes has the   curious name of cat-bird, because its note is like   the mew of a young cat. It is a lively creature,   hopping about from bough to bough, uttering its   curious cry. Although it can mew, nevertheless   it hates cats and snakes. It is an excellent mimic,   and when tamed affords much amusement.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Bad Blood. BETWEEN DUTCH AND BRITISH. A FISHING SMACK HELD UP. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

Bad Blood. BETWEEN DUTCH AND BRITISH. —«— A FISHING SMACK HELD UP.   Ramsgate smacksmen were much excited re-   cently by the news received from Ostend about the way in which their comrades had been   treated by the Dutch fishermen. There has been   bad feeling between the English and Dutch   fishermen for some months on account of the   war in South Africa.   Mr. H. Summers, smack-owner, of Ramsgate,   thus detailed matters to a "Daily Express" re-   presentative:—"Our smack, The Deerhound, No.   140, was attacked by the crew of the Dutch   herring drifter No. 224, who stole their fish,   clothes, food, and severely wounded the mate.   "Our boat was manned by Skipper George   Moody, Richard Bushell (mate), and two boys.   If the numbers had been anywhere near equal, there would have been a ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FOR THE NECK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

FOR THE NECK. The importance of being properly cravated is an item no woman can to-day afford to ignore. For a correct finish to the throat is one among the many minor things of dress that have come pre-eminently to the fore during the past two or three years—one of the little things that help so materially toward the consummation of a lovely, immaculate whole. It is now quite an accepted decree, says the "Ladies' Field," that blouses and bodices be finished by just a nar- row crossway band at the neck, so that the re- quisite change and variety may be the more easily wrought by a relay of transparent lace or net collars and cravats. The choice in these is veritably unlimited, and seems to include every available combination in the universe. A collar band of coarse guipure, for instance, is exceed- ingly ornamental finished by a cravat of esprit   net, while a knotted cravat of chiffon lends   itself with every persuasion as a relieving touch  ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Pope's Closing Days. HIS AUGUST PRIVACY. THE PREDICTIONS OF ST. MALACHY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

The Pope's Closing Days. HIS AUGUST PRIVACY. —+— THE PREDICTIONS OF ST. MALACHY. The Vatican presents a strange spectacle just   now (says the Rome correspondent of the "Daily   Chronicle," on November 15). Although his   solicitude brings a Pope into contact with the   ecclesiastical and political buzz of the whole   world, he is environed with august privacy in daily life, and above all during his last hours. This is familiarly symbolised by the solitary table of the sovereign Pontiff, at which not even crowned heads can be seated as guests. Illness brings with it a kind of desolation. There is no soft feminine hand to tend and soothe the in- valided Pope. His faithful valet Centro, a chap- lain, and a minor prelate, nurse the prostrate wearer of the Triple Crown. Outside the sick chamber the suspense is inter- mingled with whispered conversations continued after the evening "Ave Maria" at the meeting places of the d...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ROMANCE IN REAL LIFE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

  ROMANCE IN REAL LIFE.     Novelist: My dear, before you go out, do you   remember which is the unlucky mouth for marri-   iage?   Novelist's Wife (wearily): I don't know; but we were married in November. —"The Sketch."   (

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
QUITE TRUE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

QUITE TRUE.   Mrs. Naggs: "A woman doesn't always have the last word, does she?" Mr. Naggs: "Oh, no; sometimes she is talking to another woman."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DISTANCE OF THUNDER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

DISTANCE OF THUNDER. A period of five seconds between a flash of   lightning and thunder means that the flash was a   mile distant from the observer. Thunder has   not been recorded as audible more than 14 miles   from the flash, though artillery has been heard   at 120 miles.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
OLD JEWELLERY. QUAINT EARRINGS MAKE DELIGHTFUL BUCKLES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

OLD JEWELLERY. QUAINT EARRINGS MAKE DELIGHT-   FUL BUCKLES.       A queer whim of fashion is the use of quaint   old jewellery for making unique buckles and hat   ornaments. Some of the most handsome orna-   ments on the newest Parisian hats are but artis-   tic combinations of two or three pieces of the   jewellery so treasured by our grandmothers,   A smart little tricorne hat has four jewelled   drop earrings, each of a different size and design,   and skilfully joined by gold filigree work. A   Gainsborough silk beaver is greatly improved   by a ruby brooch with its gold setting.   Belt buckles, equally as novel, are similarly   fashioned. One or two cameo brooches or lockets,   the latter often bearing miniature photographs,   are joined together o...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A VILLAGE TRAGEDY. HUSBAND AND WIFE SHOT DEAD. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

    A VILLAGE TRAGEDY.   HUSBAND AND WIFE SHOT DEAD.   A terrible domestic tragedy was discovered re- cently at the village of Collision, near Arbroath. Joseph Watt, a crofter, and his wife being both found in their bedroom shot. The woman was dead, but the man still lived, though unconscious. He died the following morn- ing. Both were in their night-dresses. It is supposed that the man committed suicide after shooting his wife. Jealousy is presumed to be the cause of the tragedy. Both were about 40 years of age. They leave nine children.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NEW COINS AND STAMPS. MAY BE ISSUED TOGETHER. PROBABLY THIS YEAR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

NEW COINS AND STAMPS. MAY BE ISSUED TOGETHER.   PROBABLY THIS YEAR. Inquiries made at the Mint and the Post-office by a London pressman (says a writer in the "Chronicle") with reference to the new coinage and the new issue of stamps meet with the   answer that no official information can be given   yet. As a result, however, of other inquiries   made in non-official quarters likely to be inform-   ed on these matters, it is possible to say some-   thing about them it only by way of "intelligent   anticipation."   The new coinage was not ready last year, and   indeed this much was gathered at the Mint.   The intention was to issue it as early as possible this year. It is just possible that the new stamps   may be issued at the same time. There is an   expectation that the portrait of his Majesty,   both on the stamps ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A RECTOR'S NIGHT OUT. THE REV. C. G. YOUNG. DEPRIVED OF HIS BENEFICE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

A RECTOR'S NIGHT OUT. THE REV. C. G. YOUNG. DEPRIVED OF HIS BENEFICE. Reference was recently made to the doings of the rector of Chipstead, England, and the last mail shows that the Bishop of Rochester has de- prived that gentleman, the Rev. Charles Gordon Young, of his benefice. The procedure was brief—lasting barely ten minutes—but impressive. It took place in the Chapter House of the Diocese of Rochester, in Southwark. Only a score of people at the outside gathered in this great building, and the spoken word echoed somewhat cavernously through it in con- sequence of its emptiness. The Bishop, in his robes, stood on the platform, with the Chancellor of the Diocese and the Registrar, in wig and gown, on his right and left. The offender who was to be dealt with was not to be seen.   There were prayers and responses at the com- mencement, and then the Bishop, addressing the gallery as "brethren," and delivering his words   in deliberate, compassionate tones,...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LORD RUSSELL OF KILLOWEN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

LORD RUSSELL OF KILLOWEN. Lord Russell was not a reading man. There is an amusing story, says the "Daily Telegraph," of how oncc, desiring to be civil to Mr. Stanley Weyman, he said: 'I have read your 'Prisoner of Zenda' with much pleasure." "Oh! that's the other man," said Stanley Weyman. Wherever he went, however, he carried with him Locke "On the Human Understanding" and the "Imi- tation of Christ." He also never travelled with- out a pack of cards in his bag. Cards and horse- racing were his favorite recreations, and many good anecdotes are told in this connection, one of the best relating to the games of poker which Russell and Sir Frank Lockwood used to play with Russell's little daughters and their gover- ness. "They used to win our money," says one of them, "which greatly upset us. But we used to find it in our room when we woke in the morn- ing, so we did not mind being beaten by father and Sir Frank Lockwood." Even when he was Attorney-General, one of his "devils" discover...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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