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Title: Children's Newspaper, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 719 items from Children's Newspaper, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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No title [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

One very pretty and much appreciated present for "grown-ups" is a hairpin . cushion, and it is very easily made : A round cardboard is needed, about 3 inches across and '2 inches deep. Tf such a box is not handy, you will Hud you can cut out along strip of cardboard ; and a round for the bottom, and stitch them together. The back of an exercise book answers well for it ; this is then covered with a scrap of pretty silk or satin, and the top edge carefully pasted down in- side the rim, or tacked through the card, and the stitches afterwards hidden by a ruché of narrow ribbon ; and to finish have ready some horsehair, stuff the box nicely, and a little paste on the inside round the sides keeps this cushion in ; before putting the paste in you must cover the top of the cushion with colored mosquito net. I am sure you will be pleased with it.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

ARTHUR RICHARDSON, Paddington, writes : 1. Which side hus the best batting average in thu recent test matches? 2. Which of the three colonies performed the best in all matches ? 3. What is the best first-wicket partnership ? Questions 1 and 2 are answered below. 'A. Last year Brown and Tunnicliffe, playing for Yorkshire against 1 (erbyshire, opened their county's innings, and remained together until they had scored 4f>4 inns. This is a record for first-class cricket. These two players, in 1897, put together, in a first-wicket partnership, 885 runs for their county against Sussex, but the following year Abel and Brockwell made 386. However, the best first - wirket partnership on record is credited to Captain Oates and Private Fitzgerald, for 1st Royal .Munster Fusiliers against the Army Service Corps. These two lashed the bowling so unmer- cifully that 6S3 runs were scored before they were separated. FRKI>. MURRAY, Forest Lodge.--1. In 1S9"» T. Richardson, the fast bowler, capt...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Cricket. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

Cricket. J. Darling, captain ol the Australian Eleven, heads the Australian hatting hst with the splendid average of 41-21) runs per innings. During the tour he made !!)41 runs, which is the highest number ever recorded hy an Australian in England. Darling possesses great physical strength, as is proved by the fact that he toi k part in every match played. His style of hatting is most attractive, being both sound and aggres- sive. In 1896 Darling's average was 29*90 for 53 innings, and he achieved the distinction of being the highest individual scorer throughout the tour, with 194 against Leicestershire. J. Worrall and Clem. Hill were how led fewer times than any other member of the team. When it was definitely stated that Victor Trumper was to be a member of the Tenth Australian Eleven, several ci itics made strong objections to his in- clusion, and predicted anything hut success for this brilliant young batsman. Consequently it is gratifying to know that Trumper not only occupies ...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

NOTE -Letters insufficiently stamped will not be accepted. If you clip the ends of your envelope, and mark it " Examination Papers Only," it will (assuming, of course, that no tetter is enclosed) come by pest at the rate of ld for each 2ozs. or fraction of 2oz. Those who write for information, and require a reply by post, should enclose a stamped, addressee1 envelope Competitors under 14 may elect to compete in ( lass A if they so desire ; and those under ll may compete in Class B. But competitors who thus commence to work in a higher class than their own must commence to work in that class through cut. Under no circumstances will children over 10 be allowed to compete in Class C ; nor over 13 in Classes B or C. Children who will complete their 13th or 10th ye irs during the current half-year should work bi the Class for which their age qualifies them at the beginning of the half-year.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

"Y)T*\'Ss CORN" FLOXTR Recommended fcy the Medical Faculty as THE BEST.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

7%c *0 Australian Cloth For Australians. Marrickville Tweeds areas good and as handsome as any in the world. Send for Patterns to any tailor in Australia, but ask for " MARRICKVILLE TWEEDS," and take no other.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN INCH OF RAIN. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

AN INCH OF RAIN. "We had nearly an inch of rain" is a frequent expression, but very few people can form a definite idea of what it means. An acre is equal to 6,272,640 square inches, and water an inch deep on the area will be 6,272,640 cubic inches of water, which at i277 "274 to the gallon will mean 22,622*5 gallons. This quantity of water would weigh 226,225 Ihs., or 101 tons, less L5 ll>s. One hundredth of an inch (0-01 inch) of rain is equal, therefore, to one ton per acre.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

IMPORTANT NOTICE. NOiA£ REH DY. Brooks's New Readers Brooks's New Spellers Brooks's New Histories Brooks's New Geographies. Brooks9» New Standard Geographies« No. 1.-GEOGRAPHY FOR THIRD CLASS ... 9d. lío. 2.-GEOGRAPHY FOR FOURTH CLASS ... 9d. No. 3.-GEOGRAPHY FOR FIFTH CLASS ... ls. 6d. Each Book contains a LARGE NUMBER OF MAPS, and other illustrations by D. H. SOUTER. Brooks's New Standard English Histories« No. 1.-ENGLISH HISTORY FOR THIRD CLASS ls. No. 2.-ENGLISH HISTORY FOR HIGHER THIRD CLASS . ls. No. 3.-ENGLISH HISTORY FOR FOURTH AND FIFTH CLASSES... ls Each Book is profusely illustrated. Brooks's New Standard Reading Books« FIRST PRIMER, 32 pp. SECOND PRIMER, 48 pp. FIRST READER, 80 pp. SECOND READER, 176 pp. THIRD READER, 256 pp. FOURTH READER, 304 pp. FIFTH READER, 304 pp. 4d. 6d. 9d. ls. 3d. ls. 9d. 2s. Od. 2s. 6d. Brooks's New Standard Spelling Books. AND PUPILS' AIDS TO BROOKS'S READING BOOKS. AB Brooks's Spelling Books are compiled by the Editor of Brooks's Series, they...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CHILDREN'S NEWS PAPER [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

PAPER. I_ i \ MONTHLY [ JOURNAL 5 FOLKS 1899. [Registered at the General Post Office, Sydney, for transmission by post as a newspaper.] PRICE-ONE PENNY. ^

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SPECIAL PRIZE FOR BOYS UNDER FIFTEEN. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

SPECIAL PRIZE FOR BOYS UNDER FIFTEEN. W. Jno. Baker, the cutler of Hunter St.. has sent us a knife to give to the boy who writes the best essay on its use. The knife is a strong horn handled two bladed weapon, with a picker and tweezer, a corkscrew, a thing for pulling stones out of a horse's hoof, and another t hing. The whole being finished up with a swivel, attached to a steel chain with a leather to fasten it to a brace hutton, so that its owner can't lost it. It is a splendid present, and we want our smart hoy readers to have a try for it. Write Less than 250 words on one side of the paper, and send your copy to this office marked " Knife," not later than the 10th of October. This will give our more dis- tant readers a chance to compete.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Letter Writing. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

Letter Writing. By "GOSSIP." A/i" V dear children, I want te talk to you about something that is not ..science." Perhaps it would be more correct to call it " art." It is the art of letter-writing. A great many of you have taken to writing letters for publi- cation in our columns, and a good many of you will keep those letters till you are men and women. Our grandfathers and grandmothers used to cultivate the art of writing letters, and it was a very graceful and useful art, too. But the penny newspaper and the fevered life of the modern man, and a few other causes, have driven the art out. Now, however, with the development of the young people's paper, has come a new era. Letter-writing is coming into fas- hion, and I want to tell you something Once upon a time I had a very good schoolteacher, who was anxious to teach us little boys to think. He never wanted us to learn things " by heart" when we knew what they meant. He wanted us to learn to write letters, and he told us to write ...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

NOTE. - In last month's Question Column two typographical errors oc- curred. For A. McD., 27, read A. McD., 17 ; for O.G., 16, read V.G. 16.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE STORY OF SOUTH AFRICA. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

THE STORY OF SOUTH AFRICA. THE present unfortunate st J te of affairs in the Transvaal is natur- ally attracting the attention of the world to South Africa. So we here set down for the information of our boys and girl* a brief outline of the story of South Africa. It was in the early years of the fifteenth centur}- that Portugal, the first European country to form oversea colo- nies, commenced to make discoveries along the West African coast. To Prince Henry the Navigator, the Portu- guese Duke of Viseo, is chiefly due the increased interest in navigation and dis- covery which led to such important voyages during that famous fifteenth contury. TwentA'-six years after the death of the Navigator Prince, the Portuguese at length reached (1487) the " Cape of Storms." The}' did not make any at- tempt to form a settlement, but merely planted the Portuguese flag there. Eleven years later (1487) Vasco da Gama made his remarkable thirteen-months" voyage to India, sailing round the "Cape of S...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

WHY PAY FOR A WATCH ? CAN YOU READ THIS? |_AJ_S^L*D I S*LV*R I W*T«H | I | G**N j *F I I 1 GU*SS I R*G*T j & I B*Y | A | CH**N In order to introduce our Business into every Household in Australia, we undertake and gua- rantee to give away one of our World-famed £2 10s. Solid Silver Keyless Hunter Watches, LADY'S or GENTLEMAN'S, to every reader who sends the Correct Reading of the above Puzzle. CONDITIONS.-That your answer to the Puzzle is correct, and that you further undertake, if correct, to purchase one of our Solid Silver Single or Double Chains. Send Stamped Addressed Envelope for Reply. ADDRESS-THE MANAGER The GLOBE WATCH COMPANY, Ltd., 105 PITT-STREET, SYDNEY

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

SPECIAL NOTICE. The receipt of your copy in a coloured wrapper is an intimation that your subscription has expired. If you wish to renew it, kindly send Postal Note or Stamps at once. The receipt of your copy in a white wrapper after that is an acknowledg- ment of the remittance.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GEOGRAPHICAL FACTS & FANCIES [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

By GEO. COLLINGRIDGE, Member of the Council of the Royal Geographical Society of Australasia. III. EARLY GLOBES AND MAPS OF THE WORLD, AND STRANGE NOTIONS CONCERNING THE SHAPE OF THE EARTH. O OME of the earliest people of the ^ earth, who lived on the hanks of the rivers that now through the country once called Mesopotamia, constructed curious round boats with winch they could easily paddle about in any direction. These boats were, in shape, very much like a Chinese ginger jar. and. strange to say. the same kind of boat is still used ro this day on the lower shores of the same rivers near the confluence of the Euphrates and Tigris. One of the quaint notions of those ancient people was that the earth we inhabit was shaped like the round boats that they used. They fancied that it was hollow, and had an opening like their boats, but this open portion they imagined to be underneath, and that an immense and rapid river or ocean flowed round the gaping hollow. In that ocean lived one of t...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

The following gained marks for the questions set in our issue of July 27 : CLASS A. RH. (Rozelle), 17; I.H,A.. IS; B.A.P., 16 : M.B., 17 : W.McK., 15 ; H. S. (Myra Vale), 18; A.C., 15; L.K.B. LO: CH., 18 ; I.J.B., 18; J.B. (Hills- ton), 16 ; A.L., 16 ; J.HR., 16 : S.M.T. 14; G.A. (Mullumbimby), 19; E.S. (Moree), 17; H.L.T. 18: L.M. (Roma), 19. CLASS B. M.T. (Myra Vale), 12; V.D.. IO ; J.M.. ll; O.P. 10; C.M. K.. 12: S.K.K. IS; X.M.K., 12; A.M.M.. 10; A.S.W, 18 : M.A.C., 10; A.T. (Myra Vale), ll ; I. M.X., ll); K.M. (Narrow Creek). 13 ; U.C., 10 ; F.K., 15 ; D.G.W., 14 : S.C.T. 10; R.T., 14; A. T., 20; M.J., Ki; M.S.K., 18; R.MoG., 12; E.H.. 20; K.A.W., 18; M.M.A., 16; K.M.H.. ld; U.C., 10. CLASS C. A.H. (Bongglg), 18; CC, 10: A.D. 13: HC, 13; K.McK., 15: M. M. (MvraVale), 13: P.B., 13: A.M. (Myra Vale), 14; B.B., 14; M.B. (vivra Vain. 13; L.M. (Myra Vale), 12; O.H.B.. 16; H.J., 17 ; B.P., 18 ; CF.. ll ; A.M.S.. 17: S A.O.. 17; D.K., 18; B.G. (Myra Vale), 17; M.W.C, 20; A.L.D.. 17; M...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

[NOTE.-In all communications respect- ing exchange or purchase of stamps, enclose a stamp addressed envelope if you require a replyy b post.]

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
QUESTIONS FOR OCTOBER. CLASS A: 14 to 17 years. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

QUESTIONS FOR OCTOBER. CLASS A : 14 to 17 years. 1. Brown bought a bicycle for £10, and sold it to Jones at a gain of ten per cent. Jones sold it to Smith at a gain of ten per cent. What did Smith pay for it ? 2. Explain the causes of the recent light- ing in the Philippines. CLASS B: ll, Pi, and 13 years. 1. Longfellow's famous riddle : M,\ first is the absence of light, M\ second a house for the night ; My third is the worst of weathers, Mj w hole is a poem in feathers. 2. Maki' a drawing (larger than the copy) of the Queen of Lilies, page 97 of the CHILDREN'S NEWSPAPER tor August. ( 'LASS (,' : 10 years and under. 1. Draw (at least three times the size) a eat and a cat's head, from the copies on page 96 CN. for August. 2. Write a letter telling me about the happiest day you have spent during tins year.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FOREIGN NEWS [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

LIEUTENANT PEARY, the great American Arctic navigator, has just returned to Newfoundland. He left America in June last year in the steamship Windward. The explorer hoped to get as far as the north of Greenland, and thence go over the ice northwards to the Pole, living in snow huts with the Esquim- aux. But he failed to get farther north than his own and other ex- plorers' tonner highest latitude. A LARG ii party of French expl >rers, under a guidance of M. Foureau, the well-known African traveller, whilst travelling from Algeria, southward to Lake Tchad, over the recently-acknowledged French ter- ritory, was attacked by natives near the Oasis of Air. The whole of the members were massacred. WHILST PEARY in the Windward lias been seeking the North Pole ; Mr. Borchgrevink, in the Southern Cross, has been sear hing the South Pole The latter expedition sailed south from Tasmania on December 19, last. They reached Cape Adair on Februaty 27, last, and then the Southern Cross returned t...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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