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Elephind.com contains 12,833 items from Waynesburg Messenger, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 16 October 1861

__ _ BANK. FAMERS' & DROVERS' BANK «8SE MOOt^ST* ^. ftiEAR, CMhJr. DISCOUNT DAY, _ WEDNESDAY Sept. u. lSfil—iy.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
§t & ^iutritetj. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 16 October 1861

§t\t& ^iutritetj. Tamfiarnffl- enctr. ^ ^^^^^^~ 4 ^ ..... J JSpTwo prisoners named Dogafyo? and Kelly, of the Sixty-ninth Mew York Regiment, and a private from another regiment, escaped from Eiehmond and reached the Potomac in safety. They add nothing of importance to previous intelligence, further than an impression, gathered from conversation heard, that all of the Federal prisoners there ^vere to be removed down South, under the impression that# theeity ofBichmond might have to smwmder to our army •©"Western Pennsylvania has four Companies of infantry and three of cavalry in service in Western Virginia J>^|fdes a large number in other complies amounting to fully as many more.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Tobacco Euinous. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 16 October 1861

Tobacco Euinous. Any one—the feeblest—can commit an error; it requires a MAN to frankly acknowledge it. There is greater courage than that of marching right in the face of belching cannon in the frenzy of battle; it is that of enduring the agonies of the wheel and the stake for hours together, when a single word would cease the torment instantly. Only great minds and heroic hearts are capable of deeds like these. Last month a great name was mentioned who endured hunger in an uncomplaining gentleness for two years. Within a dozen hours the common herd becomes fretful, passionate, and impatient ot hunger. Not less great was the author of the Cause and Cure , than was the subject of this article, who, like too many Virginians , became extravagantly addicted to the use of tobacco, so much so that before lie was thirty, it threatened his intellect, and that too before he became aware of the fact that it was owing to this species of intemperance that both mind and body were failing ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The Marvels of a Seed. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 16 October 1861

The Marvels of a Seed. Have you over considered how wonderful a thing the seed of a plant is? It is the miracle of miracles.— God said, '-Let there be plants yielding seed;" and it is further added, each one ''after his kind." The great naturalist, Cuvier, thought that the germs of all past, present, and future generations of Seeds were contained one within the other, as if packed in a succession of boxes. Other learned men have explained this mystery in a different way. Let them explain it as they will, the wonders remains the same, and we must look upon the reproduction of the seed as a continual mir acle. Is there upon earth a machine, is there a palace, is there even a city, which contains so much that is wonderful as is inclosed in a single little seed—one grain of corn, one little brown apple-seed, one small seed of a tree, picked up, perhaps by a sparrow for her little ones, the smallest seed of a poppy or a blue-bell, or even one of the seeds that are so small that t...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
General Sigel. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 16 October 1861

General Sigel. It is a fact very well known, s.ays the Cincinnati "Commercial ," that this distinguished military man, shortly after he came to this country, worked at an iron foundry in this city, where he was paid the remunerative sum of 85 a week for his services. The Mexican war, however, breaking out within a month after he obtained work at this foundry, in company with a man by the name of George Brinkerhoff , he enlisted and entered that campaign as a private soldier. Upon his return to this city, at the close of the war, he remained but a short time, being induced to go to St. Louis, where he soon became the captain or -chief of the associations of Fremont and Turners. J®" Eeverdy Johnson, of Maryland, has written an eloquent and patriotic letter in refutation of the statement circulated by Secessionists that he would not accept of a Union nomination to the Maryland House of Delegates. In answer to the question, "What ought to be done at the present ?" he answers in th...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
ffapWi [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 16 October 1861

ffapWi On Sunday, Oct. 6th, 1861, by Jackson Hinderman, Esq., Mr. DAVID MUKFHSY to Miss SUSAN C BAMBKRS, both of Marshall county, Va. On the 2d of September, by Bev. Thomas Thomas, Mr. ISAAC M. Onus, of Hiramsburg, and Mies Viourr 8"is*t of. Cumberland, Ohio.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 16 October 1861

f LINDSEY'S IMPROVED * BX.OOD SUABOH-* A STANDARD MEDICINE for the speedy, radical and effectual cure ol all diseases arisinj from IMPURITY OR THE BLOOD. This medicine has wrought the most miraculous ones in desperate casca of Scrofula, Canceroap Formation, Cutaneous Diueases, Erysipelas, flail*, Pimples on (he Face, Sore Eyes, Old stubborn Ulcers, Scald Head, Tetter Affections, Rheumatic Affection*, Uyspensia, Costiveneas, Jaundice, Salt Kheum, Mercurial Diseases, General Debility. J Liver Complaint, Lost of Appetite, I Low Spirits, Foul StomaSjt. j FEMALE COMPLAiNTS, and all Disease:* originating in an Impure state of the | Blood. ^sMMffik ij_^^ THE ABOVE IS A PORTRAIT or DAVID M'CREABY. Swnrn statement of David M'Creary, of Napier tp., Bedford fntjtiry: In April. 1S."»G, as nenr as ! ran remember, a email pimple made it? appearance on my upper lip, which soon became enlarged and sore. 1 used poultices of sorrel, and a wash of blue vitriol, without effect.— Finding the Rore ex...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
When the Battle may be Expected. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 16 October 1861

When the Battle may be Expected. The public n>ust pot be impatient for the clashing of the two arujies now approaching each other in the centre of Missouri. The best information from Lexington is to the effect that Gen. Price will ppake his stand at that city with the main body of his army, and perhaps choose as his Vantage ground the very entrenchment* which were so gallantly and successfully defended by Col. Mulligan. To reach him, therefore, and give him decisive battle even within ten davs time, will require extraordinary exertions on the part of Gen. Fremont. He has forwarded to Jefferson eity as immense quantity of army baggage, including artillery and ammunition, Jh'e transportation of which will be comparatively easy and rapid by railroad to Sedalia, but the movement of which across ihe country by wagons will necessarily be difficult and slow. If the enemy therefore should not advance and give battle at some point South of Lexington, we must not look tor any i...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Jfte flf ' tyr ftej. ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ •". ¦"*'¦ [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 16 October 1861

Jfte flf ' tyr ftej. ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ •". ¦"*'¦ I**8t from Kentucky, Theae*tfrom tfintn&jia of an exciting; Skaracte*'. It daily- becomes more and more ' evident that the rebels intend to throw a very large force into that -State. Instead of sending all their available troops into Virginia , they are beleived to be withdrawing them from that region to strengthen Gen. Buckner. It is alleged by those who in Washington urge a further reinforcement of the Union troops in Kentucky, that there is good evidence that Jeff. Davis has been ordering a number of regiments from Eastern Virginia to Tennessee and lower Kentucky. The loyal men among the mountains of West Tennessee say that the Virginia Central Railroad has of late been crowded with troops on their way to Kentucky. Wherever the rebel troops go they commit great ravages and one of their chief objects is to procure supplies by plundering Union districts. General Zollicoffer, with his army of 27,000 men, has fallen back, and...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Gen, Lane's Success at Osceola. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 16 October 1861

Gen, Lane's Success at Osceola. We have intelligence by way of Leavenworth that Gen. Lane has been completely successful in his march upon Osceola. After his victory in Papinsville already recorded, he proceeded immediately to Osceola, in St. Clair county, Mo., a distance of twenty miles. The rebel force there was dislodged, the town burned, and the immense supply train of Rains and Price captured. This train was between two and three miles in length, and contained all the supplies and equipage of Rains and Price, and $100 , 000 in money. This is the, most important success gained for the Union cause in Missouri, and goes far to redeem our losses at Lexington. McCuIloch is still near Fort Scott, and his men swear they are bound for Kansas,

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Movements at Lexington Mo. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 16 October 1861

Movements at Lexington Mo. JEFFERSON CITY , Oct. 6.—A special despatch to the St. Louis Republican says: Little doubt is entertained here that Price is on his way South with the main body of his army, the force reported to be making demonstrations near Georgetown and Sedalia being merely a detachment for the purpose of keeping our advance engaged.— When last heard from Price's advance guard was in Clinton, Henry county. It is supposed Price will push to the Arkansas line. Gen. Fremont will follow him closely, and g ive him battle wherever he can find him. A force of between three and four thousand rebel cavalry were seen near Lipton to-day, whose object is presumed to be to get between our advance and this place, and fall upon some stray regiment or transportation train going out. Colonel Caffu, of Booneville, passed through here the other day for St. Louis, but it has since been ascertained that he is on his way South with important documentscontaining the , official procee...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Latest News from the South. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 16 October 1861

Latest News from the South. LOUISVILLE, Oct. 7.—A fire occurred onthe corner of Washington street and Centre alley, Memphis, on the 29th ult, and destroyed thirty thousand dollars worth of'property; it ex j tended round to the front row. Tlie I Memphis Avalanche has absorbed the I Bulletin. A Memphis paper of the 1 30th ult., says that thirty eases of 1 Enfield muskets, part of the fifty thouj Sand which came into a Southern j port some time since, arrived at Mem-| phis and are on their way to Columbus. Memphis was Utterly alive with soldiJrs on the 29th nit. " The Southern Commercial Convention assembles at Macon, Georgia, on the 14th inst. The University of Mississi ppi is about to be closed for the wan^ of patronage. Jacob Thompson has been nominated for Governor of Mississi p- i pl - I The Pocahontas Advertiser says | that T. C. Hindman obtained 3 ,000 j more men from Arkansas for Hardee's ! command. Ex-Governor E. Lewis I Lowe, of Maryland has escaped to Richmond. Isa...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Betels Robbing an Insane Asylum, [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 16 October 1861

Betels Robbing an Insane Asylum, The St. Louis papers notice a highhanded outrage recently perpetrated !in Northern Missouri ; A party of sixty rebels came into Fulton the other day and robbed an Insane Asylum there of four hun-; dred blankets, the same number of I sheets, and a quantity of articles of a i similar nature. They surrounded I the house of Dr. Smith, the Superintendent of the Asylum, while engaged in this operation. They said they came from Price's army at Lexington; that £he Asylum's property oelonged to the State, and that they had a ri ght to anything they chose to take frx>m it. The inmates of the asylum were removed some time since, on account of the action of Jackson's Legislature.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
i Hews from Fortress Monroe—A Sharp Skiri mish at Oitorwjaiet^lebelb Boated. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 16 October 1861

i Hews from Fortress Monroe—A Sharp Skiri mish at Oitorwjaiet^lebelb Boated. FoRTErtis MoiwRO^ Oct. 8.—The frigate Susquehanna has arrived from i Hatteras Inlet, and brings most in-[ teresting intelligence. The day after I the capture of the Fanny, the Ceres ' and Putnam, having one of the : launches of the Susquehanna in tow, j : went up to Chicimancofrianno and i landed seven days provisions, return-' 1 ing the same evening, without hav- ¦ ing seen anything of the Confeder- ' 1 ates. On Friday, however, word j reached Hatteras Inlet by the Stars j and Stripes that twenty-five hundred I Confederates, consisting of a Georgia, I South Carolina and "V irginia • regi- j i ment had come over from the main I ! land in six small steamers and schoon- j I ers, with flat boats, and had attacked ; the Indiana regiment, who were; I obliged to retreat. The Susquehanna ; and Monticello steamed up outside, j while Col. Hawkins marched up with i six companies and reached Hatteras Inlet by ni...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
>«» ¦*- > Washington Items, [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 16 October 1861

>«» ¦*- > Washington Items, WASHINGTON , October 8.—Eighteen batteries and six thousand four hundred cavalry were reviewed to-day. east of the Capitol. Capt. Tidball's company of mounted Artillerj', organized since the battle ofManasas, was prominent on the right. There was a large concourse of spectators, including prominent officers of the government. It was a grand spectacle. A rebel mail carrier was arrested to-day in one of the Potomac river counties of Maryland. He was brought to-ni ght to this city. The boat in which he had frequently and clandestinely crossed over into Virginia, was secured, in addition to a number of letters directed topartiesin the latter State. The impression is thf Pennsylvania people's ticket received a majority of the votes cast in the several camps hereabouts to-day, while the result among the Philabel phia volunteers will give that ticket about 3,000 majority. The government which has had the management of the Washington branch ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
» «»¦ ¦ From Jefferson City. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 16 October 1861

» «»¦ ¦ From Jefferson City. JKFFERSON CITY. October 8.—Col. Mathews telegraphed to Governor Gamble this morning, from Hermann, that lie had been compelled to surrender his camp, with three pieces of artillery, to a superior force. Colonel M.'s camp was about twenty miles from Hermann , and is said to have contained about 400 Home Guards.— The rebels numbered some 2,000 strong, and their intention is to burn the Gasconade bridge, in that vicinity. On hearing of the approach of this force, our troops at the bridge commenced erecting palisade* for its defence. Price's army was on Grand river, in Henry county, at last accounts. on Wednesday last, inarching southward. A rebel named Widemeyer is raising a regiment at Osceola for the purpose of making a foray into Kansas. Union men from the neighborhood of Lexington deny that any session of the Legislature was held there. Efforts are being made here to organize companies of rangers, to cany on guerrilla warfare after the style of ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Sen, Lee Driven From Biff Surine [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 16 October 1861

Sen, Lee Driven From Biff Surine ELK WATER, Oct. 10.—Gen. Reynolds has made two reconnoisances in force within the last few days against Gen. Lee, and has driven him from Big Spring, the former rendezvous of his main force. Part of his force is now at Elk Mountain and Greenbrier brid ge, respectively thirty and forty miles from here, and part of it, under Lee, is said to have joined Floyd. At Big Spring they destroyed the camp equipage and ammunition and burnt several hundred muskets, wagons,&c. The i-oad is absolutely impassible for wagons, beyond a point twelve miles from Elkwater.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
m * The War in Western Virginia. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 16 October 1861

m * The War in Western Virginia. WINCINXATI , Oct. 4.—The following is a special despatch to the Cincinnati Commercial: CHEAT MOUNTAIN, Va., Oct. 3.— This morning, at one o'clock, a portion of Brigadier General Reynold's brigade, consisting of three Ohio regiments, the 24th, 25th and 3d, and portions ofthesix Indiana regiments, the 7th, 9th, 13th, 14th, lath and 17th, together with detachments of Colonel Bracken's Indianaregiment, Colonel's Robinson's Ohio regiment . Col. Greenfield's Pennsylvania Cavalry, and detachments of How's regulars, Loomis, Michigan and Daum's V irginia Artillery, numbering in all 5 ,000 men, left that mountain to make a reconnoissance in force in front of the enemy's position on Green Briar river, 12 miles distant. Col. Ford's Ohio regiment was sent to secure an important road, the possession of which flanked our main col umn. The expedition arrived in front of the enemy's fortification at 8 o'clock, their p ickets retreating, after firing an ineffe...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Movements of Gen. Rosecranz, [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 16 October 1861

Movements of Gen. Rosecranz, CINCINNATI, October 10.—The Com- merciaVs Kanawa advices says that j General Rosecranz is at Mountain Cove, a strong position twenty-five ' miles beyond Gauley. He had advanced ten miles further to Little Sewell, but the enemy was too well { entrenched and too , strong at Big Sewell. five miles further on , to be attacked, and Rosecranz fell back as an invitation to come outand have a failtight. Thera was no expectation of an attempt by the enemy to force his position. The weather in the Gauley region is terribly bad. Rain ; falls almost incessantly. Rosecranz' troops are well clothed and have plenty of overcoats and blankets. The fight at Chapnianville was a sharp and bloody affair. Five of Piatt's Zouaves were killed. A dispatch from Gen. Reynolds to Gov. Morton, dated Huttonville. October, 8th. says : The enemy in our front on the Huttonville road has been driven to Greenbrier Springs, twenty miles beyond Big Springs , their late rendezvous. The...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Anticipated Battle near Darnestown. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 16 October 1861

Anticipated Battle near Darnestown. Private letters from Darnestown on Tuesday, mention indications on the part of the rebels to cross the Potomac, near the junction of the Monocacy river, and attack the divisions of Generals Banks and Stone. Rockets and signal fires have nightly l>een seen in the direction of Sugarloaf, and, it is said, that the rebels have laid a telegraphic wire through the river. The Southeastern mountain slopes of Loudon county doubtless shelter a large force of the enemy. General Stone mar, perhaps, anticipate them by making the first visit.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
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