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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. without which governments cannot endure. With the destruction of the missions began the return of the reign of violence and lawlessness, and the church, as it now exists in California, is obliged to begin its work anew, as if the history of the past hundred years had never been. There is no state in the Union, no country on oarth, in which the highest form of civilization attained, by and through tho Church, and the lowest form, that without God or morality, appear in such striking con trast as in California, and nowhere is there less said about it as an argument to maintain tho claims of the Church to bo the light of the world and the best promoter of even worldly prosperity. THE KIOWA MEDICINE DANCE. The ground within the enclosure of the Medicine Lodge had been carefully cleared of grass, sticks and roots, and covered several inches deep with a clean white sand. A screen had been con structed on the side opposite the en trance, by sticking small cotton-woods ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

10 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. side to side forward backward in creasing his motions both in rapidity and extent, until in appearance nearly frantic, his robe fell off, leaving him, except his blue breech-cloth, entirely naked. In this condition he jumped and ran about the enclosure, head, arms and legs all equally participating in the violence of his gestures every joint of his body apparently loosened, his eyes onty fixed. I wonder how, with every joint apparently dislocated, and every muscular fibre relaxed, he could maintain the upright position. Thus he continued to exercise with out ceasing, or once removing his eyes from the sun, until the sweat ran down in great rolling drops, washing the white paint into streaks, no more or namental than the original painting, and he was at last compelled to retire from mere exhaustion, while the other dancers were still continuing their exercises. Presently another man entered from behind the screen, wearing an Indian fur cap and blue breeching-c...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 11 Tho Benedictine Sisters, of Guthrie, have opened a school at Okarcheo, Okl. Ter. Miss Julia Furstenborg, of Macon, 111., is visiting her brothers at Sacred Heart. Tje Indian Advocate Is ft Quarterly Review, published by the Benedictine Fathers of the Indian Tcr., to plead the cause of the last remnants of Indian tribes, nnd to give n history of their progress toward civilization. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of each tribe ; their progress In education nnd religion ; their occupa tions, industries, schools, etc., etc. Also, a history of our mis sions, statistics, nnd other interesting matter that can not bo found In any other publication. The proceeds of this Review will be used for educating and converting tho Indians of the Territory. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, Sacred Heart P. 0 , Okla. Ter. AlTKOVEn HY RlOHT IlBV. TIIEO. MEERSCHAERT, Vicar Apostolic ok Oklahoma and INIHAN TEIUUTOKY. A Quarterly Roviow, nntored at tho Sacred Heart Post Oil...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

msmmmmm 12 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. The impatient man is the sport of his friends and scoff of his enemies ; he can be played upon easier than a pipe. But when you come to deal with a thorough ly patient man, be careful what you do; he will fool you to the top of your bent and trip you when you least expect it. In proportion as you get patience, you get power. The Germans say that it is the cold hammer which fashions the hot iron : and what passes into a pro verd with those people, you may be sure is worth remembering. The problem of life is like a sum in proportion. If you state the problem rorretly you find the true solution, if incorrectly, you arrive at a wrong re sult. When stating the problem of life, the unspiritual man always puts the wrong term in the first place, and consequent fails to find the true solu tion of the problem. Religion ought to come first in a word, we ought to state the problem as the Great Teacher has instructed us to state it: "Seek first the Kingdom of God,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

tb Me Indian advocate. u The Benedictine Sisters of Shoal Creek, Ark., have opened a school for the Cherokee Indians, at Vinita, Ind ian Territory. On the advice of competent physi cians, our Rt. Rev. Father Abbot went to his native land to recuperate his much impaired health. People who think much of their hu mility are very proud, and all such unreal stooping is subtle search how to go up higher. Some one remarks, that the boy who is always carrying on in school, seldom does much of the carrying when honors are distributed. " Patrick, did Mr. Tom call?" "He did, sorr." "And did you give him an evasive answer?" "I did sorr." "Well, what did you say?" " I axed him was his grandmother a monkey, sorr !' Some ancient languages present, amongst other peculiar features, this difference from our modern languages : that they employ no present tense in expressing action, but have only a past and future. At first sight this may ap pear odd, but on second thought it will be found based on a d...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 14 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. UM IN MEMORIAM. Rt. Rev. Thomas Duperon, 0. S. B., Abbot of the Sacred Heart (Okla. Ter.) died in Paris, France, December 7th. He was on his way to his native coun try, where the physicians had sent him for the recovery of his health. Abbot Thomas Duperon was but 55 years of age, born October 29th, 1842, atAscain, (B. Pyrenees, France). He entered the seminary at Bayonne, in 1864, and was ordained June 6th, 1868. He began his priestly career as a mis sionary of the Diocese, where he labor ed successfully up to 1870, when he became a chaplain of the army during the Franco-German war. Feeling a call to religious life, he joined the Ben edictine Order, of Pierre-Qui-Vire, (France,) where he filled the impor tant office of Master of Novices for nearly ten years. The expulsion of the religious orders from that country in 1880, brought him to Ireland, where he conducted his little flock for two years, until he was appointed Prior a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 15 latter are of huge size, resembling in ap pearance a gigantic hive, and contain ing several hundred separate chambers. These were at first supposed to be communal structures, but it is now known that, while each cluster is the homo of a certain clan or combination of clans, the different families who compose it each have their own quar ters in it. The clustering of rooms into large hive-like structures grows directly out of certain rules of houso building, which are the results of peculiar social con ditons under which people live. Among them descent is in the female line ; the children of a marriage belong to the mother, and are members of her clan and of her family. As a man is not allowed to marry within his own clan, he looses some of his rights when he takes to himself a helpmate, or more correctly, when his helpmate takes him, for when he marries he goes to the home of his wife to live, and to a cer tain degree is adopted into her family. From this it c...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

16 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. hored guest, and should he misbehave in any way, lie can be sent back to his family or turned adrift to shift for him self. It is hardly necessary to add, that the greatest affection prevails in the household, and that such a thing as wife beating or ill treatment of women is unheard of in the tribe. When a family finds it necessary to build additional rooms, notice is sent to the priestess of the clan, who makes the necessary arrangements. This priestess is the social head of the clan, and no business connected with the house can be conducted without her aid. She has also the final say in all proposed marriages, etc. The men of the family are required to bring in the necessary material, broken and dressed stone for the walls, beams for the roof, clay for martar, etc. As the villages of the Moki are all situated on the tops of the mesas, 600 feet or more above the valley, this is no small task. When everything is in readiness, an nouncement is made from the h...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

Tllti INDIAN ADVOCATE. 17 V den down in the same way ; in fact, roofs and floors are much the same, and in the upper stories the floors of the rooms were once the roofs of those be low. When the floor" are done, the walls are plastered with mud nicely smoothed with the hand. Sometimes they are finished with a wash of white clay, which gives them a very neat ap pearance. Formerly a custom prevailed of leav ing a small space on the wall bare, a belief existing that one of the gods came and finished it ; and although the space remained bare, it was supposed to bo covered with an invisible plaster. When the house is completed to this point, four feathers are prepared, sim ilar to those used under the four corners of the house. These are tied to a short willow stick which is inserted over one of the central roof beams. The feath ers are removed every year at the feast celebrated in December, when the sun begins to return northward ; that is, at the winter solstice. The ceremony known as ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

-gmwmmmmmmpmmmmmmmcm 18 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ROBBED A DEAD RED MAN. Real Cause of, Indian Outrages in the Black Hills. Pale Faces Stole the Burial Outfit of a Brave. Gold was discovered in the Black Hills in 1874, and regardless of Indian ownership, white men from all parts of the United States rushed into the hills in eager search for the precious metal. The Indians entered a strong protest, and appealed to the United States authorities to expel the miners from their reservation. Many were driven out by the troops, but in spite of all op position the spring of 1876 found the new gold fields literally alive with white men and mines giving up gold at the rate of thousands of dollars per day, while every trail leading to the Black Hills across the reservation became a public highway, over which supplies were hauled into the mines. One of the principal routes to the Black Hills was over the Bad River trail, through the very heart of the great Sioux reser vation in South Dakota. Fort Pi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

"HfHyTPW fo' "?r?iw'T,-r""v' ii-iihk-.p'' THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 19 from every side. At length one of them said: "Say, boys, that looks like a good robe around that redskin, some body bring an axe from the wagon, and we'll see how they fix up a dead injen anyway." The axe is brought, and in a moment the posts are cut through, and the scaffold with its gruesome ten ant, falls to the ground. The lariat is loosened, and two men (?) seize the edge of the robe and unwind it. from the body. It is, indeed, a good robe. They shake it in the wind, and thon throw it into their wagon. "We'll have use for that robe," they say. ' The removal of the robe brought to view the dressed deerskins "Just what wo want," they said, "to make whip lashes," and the deerskin followed the buffalo robe into the wagon. And then the blanket, which was a brand new one. It wouldn't do to leave that, so into the wagon it went to keep company with the rest of the funeral furniture. Next their attention was given to the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

PSSHP 20 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. The Countersign was "Mary." I RY MARGARET EYTINGE. 'Twos near the break of day, but still The moon was shining brightly ; The west wind as it passed the flowers Set each one swaying lightly ; The sentry slow paced to and fro, A faithful night-watch keeping, While in the tents behind him stretched, His comrades all were sleeping. Slow to and fro the sentry paced, His musket on his shoulder, But not a thought of death or war Was with the brave young soldier. Ah, no ! his heart was far away Where, on a Western prairie, A rose-twined cottage stood. That night The countersign was "Mary." And there his own true love he saw, Her blue eyes kindly beaming; Above them, on her sun-kissed brow, Her curls like sunshine gleaming ; And heard her singing, as she churned The butter in the dairy, The song he loved the best. That night The countersign was " Mary. "Oh, for one kiss from her!" he sighed, When up the lone road glancing He spied a form, a little form, With fa...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 21 guardianship of every man. Ho felt the necessity of great care in the choice he mado. Such a choice is indeed not a trifling matter, not so unimportant an affair as some seem to think it ; the happiness of a whole life-time, perhaps even eternal salvation itself, may be at stake. Young people especially are very susceptible to the influence of those who are about them. They are open-hearted, unsuspecting, too ready often togive their confidence and friend ship to those unworthy of either. They are slow to abandon those upon whom they have bestowed their regard, un willing to believe evil of them because of their affection for them. And so the danger to their virtue is very great when they fall into bad company, their ignorance of the world and their guile lessness leaving them open to many temptations. The bad companion is he who is try ing to rob us of our virtue to rob us of the best we possess. Virtue is a precious thing. It is a treasure beyond price. To ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

22 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. TOUCH NOT THE LORD'S ANNOINTED. From a very early period it was felt that the uprooting of Christianity would follow the extinction of the priesthood. Hence, the fiendish mal ice of pagan tyrants against the Lord's annointed. Nero deserves to be re membered as the personification of all that is brutal in human nature. His ferocity was that of a wild beast. Dur ing his reign new instruments of cruelty were continually invented to torture countless hosts of human beings guilty of no crime except the worship of the true God. The glorious Apostles, Peter and Paul were among his victims. Con demned by his own conscience, and hated even by his household, the fear of summary vengeance constantly haunt ed him. Barefooted and half naked he ran from place to place, like a bull flee ing from the slaughter. He was not worthy of the death decreed by the Senate. The executioner of Nero should be no other than Nero, and he became his own murderer. Oh! pro found mystery of t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 23 heaven prevented his design, and the prophecies were confirmed by leaving not a stone upon a stone of the sacred edifice. While at war with the Persians he was killed and his dying words were full of blasphemy against our Divine Lord. Valens, another Arian perse cutor, was burnt alive on the day of victory. Other emperors pursued a similar course, and were examples of heaven's vengeance. They did not repent, as did Mauritius, who, while giving his neck to the executioner, exclaimed: "Thou art just, 0 Lord, and Thy judgment is right." Constans ordered the tongue of Pope St. Martin I. to be cut out, and he himself was murdered. Justinian outraged Pope Sergius, and he was beheaded. Henry VII., the enemy of Gregory VII., was deprived of his empire by his own children, and he was cast into prison, where he died like a mad dog. The end of Henry VIII. was like that of a beast or a demon. Overcome with re morse, unrepentant and in despair, ho had to exclaim: "ALL IS ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

24 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. AMONG THE INDIANS. Col. S. L. Taggart, a brave soldier who is stationed on the Flathead In dian Reservation, Montana, writes for the Dubuque Times a very interesting description of the conversation of the Flatheads to the Church and their con tinued loyalty to their " Black Robes." Col. Taggart is anon-Catholic, but ho is no Sheldon Jackson. He admires what the Catholic Missonaries havo done for the Indian, as the following letter eloquently testifies : On Sunday last I attended service in the chapel connected with the agency, and it was to me a novel as well as an interesting scene. For at least half an hour before the appointed time the ex tensive plain that nearly surrounds the church was dotted in many directions with approaching figures on horseback. As they arrived I found them to be men, women and children arrayed in their Sunday best ; a few wearing civil ized costumes in part, but the majority still clinging to a bright shawl or light blanket of many...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 25 their souls, and how to obtain thorn was frequently discussed in their councils, and, in view of the overwhelming diffi culties, wo may well imagine the argu ments for and against any plan propos ed. Finally, in a general assembly, at the suggestion of Ignace, it was resolved to send an expedition to St. Louis, and four of their braves volunteered for this hazardous project. The heroic audacity of such a step compels our admiration of their courage and warrants censure for their foolhardiness. None of these people except the Iroquois had ever seen a village of the whites, and but few of them a white man's face. They would have to travel a distance of nearly three thousand miles over almost im passable mountains, sandy deserts and treeless plains ; cross wide, deep-rushing streams, be constantly on the watch for deadly enemies, and guard them selves day and night against known and unknown dangers of every sort. In the spring of 1831 these four brave volunteers...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

26 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. CHEYENNE AND ARAPAHOE INDIANS. I. CHEYENNE TRIMS. The Cheyennes are one of the wes ternmost tribes of the great Algonquin stock. In one of their ghost songs they sing of the "turtle river," on which they say they once lived. From several evidences this seems to be iden tical with the Saint Croix, which forms the boundary between Wisconsin and Minnesota. This statement agrees with the opinion of Clark, who locates their earliest tradition in the neighbor hood of Saint Anthony falls. They were driven out by the Sioux and forced toward the northwest, where they came in contact with the Asini boin (called by them Hohe), with whom they were never afterward at peace. At a later period, according to Lewis and Clark, they lived on the Cheyenne branch of Red river, in northern Minnesota, whence they were again driven by the Sioux into the prairie. In 1S05 they wandered about the head of Cheyenne river of Dakota and in the Black Hills, and were at war with the Sioux, t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 27 on scaffolds in treos, unlike their con federates, the Arapahoe, who bury in the ground. Their most sacred pos session is the bundle of "medicine arrows," now in possession of the southern division of the tribe. They have a military organization similar to that existing among the Arapahoe and other prairie tribes. Above all the tribes of the plains, the Cheyonnes are distinguished for their desperate courage and pride of bearing, and are pre-eminently warriors among people whose trade is war. They are strongly conservative and have steadily resisted every advance of civilization, hero again differing from the Arapahoe, who have always shown a disposition to meet the white man half way. In fact no two people could well exhibit more marked differences of characteristics on almost every point than these two confederated tribes. The Cheyennes have quick and strong intelligence, but their fighting temper sometimes ren ders them rather unmanageable subjects with wh...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

2S THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. their earliest recollection, until put on reservations, they have been at war with the Shoshone, Ute, Pawnee and Navaho, but have generally been friendly with their other neighbors. The southern Arapahoe and Cheyenne have usually acted in concert with the Commanche, Kiowa, and Kiowa Apache. Until very recently, the Arapahoe have been a tj'pical prairie tribe, living in skin tepees and following the buf falo in its migrations, yet they retain a tradition of a time when they were agricultural. They are of a friendly ac commodating disposition, religious and contemplative, without the truculent, pugnacious character that belongs to their confederates, the Cheyenne, al though they have always proven them selves brave warriors. They are also less mercenary and more tractablo than the prairie Indians generally, but hav ing now recognized the inevitable of civilization have gone to work in good faith to make the best of it. Their re ligious nature has led them to ta...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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