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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1985

MOUNTAIN MEMORIES © COPYRIGHT 1984 By: Louzilla Patrick I grew up here in the beautiful mountains of Kentucky. I was one of 10 children of Milton and Rose Anna Patrick. Both are deceased along with two of my brothers. The rest of the family are scattered, so all I have left is memories.... Memories of walking to school carrying my dinner in a paper poke and taking sandwiches made on crackers or biscuits Mom baked from scratch; or even cornbread. ....Walking to church many long miles carrying my shoes to keep them clean and make them last longer, for we only got two pair of shoes a year, but they were all we needed. We went barefooted during the summer. No glass to cut our feet and water was nice and clear back then. We could go try swimming even if we didn't know how. Mom made most -of our clothing except shoes and cotton socks. We played outside alot, made our make believe playhouses, went to what we called the jungles above the house and gathered mountain tea..Visited what we call...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1985

PAGE 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1985 BACKROADS Continued from page 20. , ' W | f ~'€ '■ f ' Pine Creek Primitive Baptist Church, mile 12.5 on our tour. good salesmanship, he threw one of his pots against a rock in the unpaved street. To the dismay of those who witnessed his act, the pot didn't break as most of the brittle iron of the day would have normally done. It seems that the ore Captain Shelor was mining contained just enough copper to create an alloy which made his wares much more durable than others available. After seeing Captain Shelor's pot didn't shatter when thrown against a rock, he quickly sold the entire load to the merchants and townspeople of Lynchburg. He then returned to Floyd County where he continued to operate t,he smelter and mine until once again, the nation he had fought to create needed volunteers and Captain Shelor, already in his sixties, walked to Norfolk, Virginia to offer his assistance in the War of 1812. Like the alloy from his mine, one can sense ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1985

BACKROADS and it seemed like they were at the end of their rope, something would happen, almost miraculously which would enable them to continue. Either a small donation would come in or someone would volunteer their labor and one more year of promise to Mrs. Martin would be fulfilled. Weeds are now as high as some of the tombstones and as is being heralded in, the Nichols are once more at the end of their rope and funds. The mounting odds of health, age and no funds are making them worry about the future of Pine Creek Cemetery and their promise to Mattie Martin more than ever now. I not only volunteered my labor, but I promised the Nichols that an appeal would be made to our readers for contributions of labor or cash or both in order to help preserve this historical old cemetery. Mrs. Nichols seemed relieved and said, "Maybe you'all will be what happens now," meaning that perhaps our readers could be the miracle that's needed now. I hope so. If you would like to make a donation to ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1985

t HEART OF THE BLUE RIDGE V\ounia?n * Copyright 1984 Laurel Publications Inc. ,A sr J^aurel Monthly Journal of Mountain Life A self-guided monthly tour of t Mountain Backroads PAGE 24 mountains never get to see the really pretty places that are hidden away on mountain back roads. As residents who love and appreciate a stream gurgling through a glade or a deer standing in a roadside meadow or an old weathered barn tucked away in a mountain hollow, our BACKROAD column allows us to share Dur favorite spots with you. This month's BACKROAD will begin and end at Tuggles Gap, Virginia at the intersection of Virginia Route 8 and the Blue Ridge Parkway (milepost 165.2) in From this intersection we will travel a total of 24.7 miles and 189 years back to a time when out nation was forming and the foundation of our independence was being laid. Here, among the rolling hills of Floyd County, Virginia, we will see first hand "the front pages of American history", to quote my friend "Oliver". Our t...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1985

FEBRUARY 1985 Monthly Journal of Mountain Life THE UNLIKELIEST REVENUER Tully Beegard was a tall, burly man whose weight was in the neighborhood of three-hundred pounds. He wore a bushy, coppercolored moustache and, except for a tuft of red hair plastered to the front of his skull, like a stick-on Christmas bow, he was completely bald. - Although he lived in a Harlan County, Kentucky coal camp, he definitely wasn't a coal miner. His occupation was that of making the best "moonshine" in that part of the Commonwealth. Quite naturally, where moonshine was being made and sold, there were "Revenuers" close by trying to put the distillers out of business and into jail. Tully never worried much about them, however. His "still" was hidden on a mountainside so far back in a remote hollow the only way in and out was on horseback. And, of course everyone knew that Revenuers knew next to nothing about the rugged terrain, and most were terrified of the dense underbrush and rocky hillsides. Visio...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1985

PAGE 2 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1985 THE UNLIKELIEST REVENUER Continued from page 1. lifted the rifle to his shoulder and drew a fine bead between Albert's eyes. Slowly he squeezed the trigger. CLICK! The rifle had misfired! Tully hissed curses at everything from Albert's good luck to Mr. Winchester's incompetence. He then stuck the stock of the rifle under his right arm and began to jerk the jammed bolt backwards and forward. His manipulations proved to be highly effective. The rifle cracked, propelling a slug right through Hargis Minton's living room window and burying itself in the wall behind his mother-in-law's picture. She'd been drilled right between the eyes. The lights in both houses came on. Tully took off running just as Johnny Powell burst through his kitchen door, blazing away with a twelve guage shotgun. Tully ran toward Hargis Minton's house and made a perfect swan dive over a woven wire fence that enclosed his backyard. He landed with a skidding, crunching thud righ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1985

GRANDPA DOODLE'S FIRST DANCE, 1932 My grandfather was Dilver Burcham, better known as Grandpa Doodle. He was born November 7, 1883 and died August 25, 1969He lived in Fancy Gap, Virginia most of his life. I was the oldest grandchild and thought there wasn't anything like him. Everywhere he went, I thought I must go too. Grandpa ran a "thrash" machine for many years, taking toll grain for his work. In the fall, after the grain was all thrashed, he would take a day and gather up his toll. He used horses and a wagon for transportation and sometimes I went with him. We would be gone all day. Occasionally I took a nap in the wagon while he gathered his grain and talked to his friends. Grandpa Doodle was a Primitive Baptist believer. Whenever a preacher from far away came to speak, he would stop what he was doing to go to church. Sometimes we walked three or four miles and returned in the evening. The one thing I remember best was the time Grandpa went to a dance. One of our neighbors, El...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1985

PAGE 4 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1985 A HORSE AND BUGGY COURTSHIP My husband Dennis and I didn't meet in the John Hayes Hollow, but every chance he gets he loves to tell that where I lived, you had to leave your car several miles before you got there, ride a mule as far as it could go, then swing the rest of the way in on a grapevine. He adds that he married me because he felt so sorry for me, begging him to take me out of that hollow with tears in my eyes, and he just couldn't walk away and leave me there crying. The truth is, my family moved out of the John Hayes Hollow in the early spring of 1934 to grow a tobacco crop for a big farmer in the flat lands, about a hundred miles from the hollow. It was our first time to venture out of our mountains and a very exciting time for us children. I met Dennis in the early spring of 1935- I remember the day as if it were yesterday. It was a nice Sunday afternoon. My two sisters and I were walking home from a neighbor's house when we met thi...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1985

A HORSE AND BUGGY COURTSHIP Continued from page 4. some people stayed at the alter to be prayed for. As long as there were people at the alter, the choir had to stay and keep singing. Well, I saw Dennis and this pretty girl disappear into the darkness in the direction of where he had his horse tied and my heart sunk. Just about that time, my baby brother came around back of the choir and climbed up beside me. I whispered to him to do me a favor. If he would, I would give him a piece of chewing gum. He said, "O.K. What?" I said, "Go tell that guy we rode over here with not to leave until I get out there. I have something to tell him. " Well, that was a mistake, a big mistake! Once my little brother got his chewing gum, he told Mom and Dad and my older brother and they really gave me a rough time. Dennis has never let me forget it. He still laughs about me getting jealous. She was just a neighbor he said. That summer we had several buggy rides, but always with my sisters. Never alone....

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1985

PAGE 6 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1985 UNCLE GEORGE GOES NORTH Many of my stories deal with people I knew while growing up in the Green River section of Western Kentucky. George Howe had a natural spontaneous humor that made him a local legend. Even though he has been dead for over 30 years, people in McLean County, Kentucky still repeat a lot of his homey sayings. If he were alive today, with a proper public relations man, he would probably be a country comedian on a par with the late Rod Brasfield. This is the story of his trip north as he told it. I am sure some of it was tongue-in-cheek. Uncle George was no fool. But I can certainly see him baiting the surly conductor. In 1936, Uncle George Howe decided to take a trip to Cincinnati to visit his son. It is believed to be the first Uncle George had ever been out of his native McLean County. I have written this story in Uncle George's own vernacular and dialect. The story is written as he would tell it if he were alive today. The st...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1985

UNCLE GEORGE GOES NORTH Continued from page 6. I reckon he was real pleased, because he kind of smiled and took the paper off fer another feller to read. Purty soon, two fellers come out and started putting grub on my table. I ain't never seed so much belly timber fer one man. I got away with most of it. I noticed this pocket at the side of my seat where somebody had put some papers and magazines. I reckon this was fer trash, so I raked the leavings off the table and into the pocket. I reckon they had fellers being paid to do this, but I got feelings fer the hired help. I enjoyed my dinner, but it shore was steep. It tore the devil out of a ten-dollar bill. On the way back to my seat I run into Crackerbox, and I thought I'd josh him up a bit. "Mr. Conductor, Sir," I said, real polite-like. "What do you want?" he growled. "Well Sir, I notice you got a cowcatcher on the front of the train. Now, if I could offer some advice, I might suggest you take the cowcatcher off the front and put...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1985

PAGE 8 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1985 After last Valentines Day, Caleb and Henry found out they had both been courting the widow sisters. Up to that point, they hid it from each other thinking the other would poke fun at him. Perhaps each were also a little afraid the other would try to "steal his girl". The cat was out of the bag when they both showed up on Valentines Day at pratically the same time. Since then, they had done most of their courting together, as called double-dating. Nothing serious mind you, but still time spent in enjoyable companionship for all four of them. Now, with another Valentines Day coming up, they all considered it a sort of anniverasary and wanted to make it special. "Henry, you ain't gonna go mushy at Valentines the way you did last year, are you?" "Caleb, you can just hold your tongue! When I arrived at the widow's with my box of candy, who was already sitting there but you?" "Now Henry, no need to get all riled up. I was just thinking that this year ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1985

An Excerpt From: THE HERITAGE OF THE GERMAN PIONEERS INFRANKLIN COUNTY Dr. Frank B. Hurt is a native of Franklin County, Virginia and a descendant of some of its ear-* liest settlers. He has written two books, A HISTORY OF FERRUM COLLEGE, AN UNCOMMON CHALLENGE, 1914-1974, and THE HERITAGE OF THE GERMAN PIONEERS IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, VA. Both of these books are available for purchase and by mail order at Ferrum College Bookstore, or The Ferrum Craft Shop, Route 1, Ferrum, Va. 24088. The cost of A HISTORY OF FERRUM COLLEGE, AN UNCOMMON CHALLANGE, 1914-1974, is $9-95 and THE HERITAGE OF THE GERMAN PIONEERS IN FRANKLIN COUNTY is $3.50. (This includes postage and handling.) The proceeds from the sale of these books go into a scholarship fund at Ferrum College in the name of Dr. Hurt's parents, John Kemper and Lelia Angle Hurt. Dr. Hurt is gathering material and researching the Scotch-Irish heritage in the Blue Ridge, in hopes of publishing a book on this subject. The HISTORY OF FERRUM COLL...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1985

PAGE 10 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1985 HOLPIN' M OM MA WITH THE COOKIN' My Granddaddy Troy Goodson was probably the most well-known and well-respected restaurant owner Galax, Virginia ever had. It wasn't just what he called "good home cookin'," or the ruinous portions he made the cooks dish out in the kitchen until threatening economic disaster literally forced him to cut back on the "holpin's." It was the man himself. Many and many's the customer - men, women, couples, families - who would call me over when I was working in Granddaddy's cafe, introduce themselves and shake me by the hand, and tell me how they'd driven fifty miles out of their way "just to come up to Galax and eat dinner with Uncle Troy." Now the point of this is not to brag on my own granddaddy. To do that would be a kind of insult to him. Troy Goodson was simply a remarkable man, and he came from a remarkable family of tim-ber-cutting, farming and whiskeycooking Blue Ridge mountaineers who, some time around or bef...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1985

HOLPIN' MOMMA WITH THE COOKIN' Continued from page 10. stole his law books, studied on his own with Galax Mayor Dacosta Woltz and Judge Horace Sutherland, passed the bar exam and mailed the books back to the law school. At 19, Price had to wait two years before he was legally allowed to pratice law. In the meanwhile there was a busted restaurant business to get back on the road, and with my father's help and mainly with the strong and feisty, devoted shoulders of my Aunt Ila, Troy Goodson reopened Goodson's Snappy Lunch Cafe on West Grayson Street, right behind Main Street and the First National Bank. And again, for a short while, he prospered and became famous all over Grayson and Carroll Counties for his home cooking and for his natural-born human kindness to man, woman and child, of whatever race, creed or color. Grandd&ddy was fairly flush before the 1950'5. I remember as a child when he knocked down the wall to the store next door and doubled the size of the restaur...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1985

PAGE 12 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1985 The Mail Box Dear Editor, I would like to take this opportunity to tell you how much our family appreciates you publishing the story which appeared in the November issue on "Old Time Turkey Drives". The story was about my grandfather, Trever Marshall, who would have been 86 years old November 24, but departed this life November 4, shortly after your paper came out. He did however, get to see the article before he passed away and enjoyed it very much. Again, we would like to thank you for your kindness in publishing this article. We enjoy your paper very much and will treasure this issue forever. Sincerely, Joyce Cromer Floyd, Virginia Dear Mt. Laurel, A year or so ago my Dad brought home a copy of your Mountain Laurel. We all enjoyed it so much he subscribed to it. Now when my parents finish a copy, it is passed on to me and then on to an elderly neighbor of my parents. Last Christmas Eve I read aloud several articles from your paper. That Chri...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1985

Genealogy I have information and photographs of the Shelor, Webb and Slusher families that I will share with others. Marvie Shelor Shelor Plant Co. P.O. Box 665 Grandview Drive Ext. Sparta, N.C. 28675 Dear Editors, This past summer I was visiting my daughter in Evington, Va. I bought a copy of your paper because of the genealogy section. I'm tracing my family roots, and I would appreciate any information on Henry Lee Campbell, my great-grandfather, born in Roanoke County, Va. 184$. His father was John Campbell, born in Va Isos. John married a Mary B. Jordan on May 26, 1830. Her father was Jerimiah Jordan. Subscribe Today To The Mountain Laurel A Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life 1 Year (12 Issues) Only $ 6.00 Send A Gift! 2 Year (24 Issues) Only SIO.OO Tell us the occasion, (Happy Valentines Day, Get Well Soon, OF Anniversary, Happy Birthday, or send'the appropriate'ird?" W6 ' ll 3 (' 36 Only $15.00 (CANADA AND ALL FOREIGN COUNTRIES ADD SIO.OO PER YEAR Send Your Check Or Money Order ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1985

PAGE 14 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1985 \ HOW TO LOVE AND BE LOVED J HOW TO LOVE AND BE LOVED We recently ran across a copy of an old book called, "How To Love and Be Loved". There was no identification at all on the book as to who the author, publisher or even date of publication was. It seems to be around the turn of the century in it's style. This book must have been a great help for many lonely people in its day. I can't imagine how young people courted without it for it carefully outlines all of the social "rules" of courtship. A few of the chapter headings are: First Love, How To Begin A Courtship, How To Choose A Husband Or Wife, Ways And Means, Disqualifications. Then there are the chapters dealing with more specific details such as: How To Court A Shy Girl, A Lively Girl, An Old Maid, The Fascinating Widow. Add to this such advice as "Handkerchief Flirtation" and Glove Flirtation" which outline every possible position of gloves and a handkerchief and explain what each meant ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1985

ForSa,# The Perfect Location SINCE THE BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY WAS BUILT IN THE 1930'S FOLKS HAVE BEEN VISITING MEADOWS OF DAN, VIRGINIA IN STEADILY INCREASING NUMBERS EACH YEAR. DUE TO THE STRATEGIC LOCATION OF THIS AREA IN THE EXACT NORTH TO SOUTH CENTER OF THE BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY/SKYLINE DRIVE, IT HAS BECOME A FAVORITE STOPPING OFF POINT FOR VISITORS TO THE BLUE RIDGE. TODAY, WITH THE NUMBER OF VISITORS TO MEADOWS OF DAN FAR IN EXCESS OF 1/000,000 ANNUALLY, THERE IS A SHORTAGE OF OVERNIGHT ACCOMODATIONS. CURRENTLY, WITHIN A 15 MILE RADIUS OF MEADOWS OF DAN, THERE ARE LESS THAN TWENTY MOTEL UNITS AVAILABLE. THERE IS DEFINITELY A NEED FOR MORE ACCOMODATIONS AND OUR AREA, LIKE MOST RURAL AREAS, COULD USE THE ADDITIONAL JOBS THAT A QUALITY LODGE WOULD CREATE HERE. WE # RE LOOKING FOR SOMEONE TO PROVIDE A LODGE OR OTHER QUALITY OVERNIGHT ACCOMODATIONS TO OUR AREA VISITORS. IF YOU'RE LOOKING FOR A SOUND INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY, PLEASE CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING FACTS: PARKWAY OVERNIGHT ATTRACTION...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1985

PAGE 16 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1985 © COPYRIGHT 1985 On a rainy Sunday in November I drove up to Barren Springs, Virginia. On my way I stopped in Sylvatus, Virginia for church services. I was on my way to meet Richard and Creola Bond for the first time. Mr. Bond sent word that he had a story for me and Mrs. Bond invited me for Sunday dinner. When I arrived, Richard came out on the back porch. Right away I liked his merry and smiling face. Creola and their daughter greeted me warmly. Believe me, on that Sunday I enjoyed a good country dinner topped off by homemade cake with strawberries. Mmmmmm! After dinner, we went into the living room and settled down for a long talk. Already I could tell that Richard enjoys talking and Creola is a quiet, soft spoken lady and devoted wife and mother. The Bonds celebrated 57 years of marriage on October 27th. And now, Richard Bond, as he related some of the story of his life to me: "I was born at Fancy Gap, Virginia in 1907, the son of Carl Ande...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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