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Elephind.com contains 719 items from Children's Newspaper, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 August 1899

THE Children's Newspaper. PUBLISHED MONTLY. PRICE - ONE PENNY. THE CHILDREN'S NEWSPAPER may be ordered direct from the Publishers by remitting a year's subscription - ONE SHILLING in stamps. Postage to other colonies 6d. extra. The simplest way to get the paper is to order it through a local Bookseller or News Agent, from whom you can purchase it monthly at a cost of ONE PENNY per copy. SPECIAL NOTICE. The receipt of your copy in a coloured wrapper is a intimation that your subscription has expired. If you wish to renew it, kindly send Postal Note or Stamp at once. WM. BROOKS & CO., 17 CASTLEREAGH-STREET, SYDNEY MONDAY, AUGUST 28.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 August 1899

Many competitors made a satisfactory attempt at a short story on Mr. Souter's picture. Here is one of the best of them sent in by Mary Butt, of Bongongolong:   "Master James may put on his new   trousers to-day," said Nurse, as she walked into the room where three children were in bed. "Oh, may I   really put on my trousers?" cried Jim.   When they came out to breakfast their mother and aunt kissed Willie and   Ida; but when auntie went to kiss Jim   he said: "I am too big for ladies to   kiss, now." After they had finished breakfast, they children prepared to go out to play. Jim usually took a hoop or skipping rope; but   he did not this morning, and when they scampered off to their favourite place in the garden to play, some- how Jim was all left behind. As they were running Willie fell down, and began to cry. "Oh you cry-baby,"   said Jim, "what do you want to cry ...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CLASS B. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 August 1899

CLASS B. 1. A billion buds are born that never blow,   That sweet with promise, lift a pretty head, To blush and wither on a barren bed, And leave no fruit to show. [From poem Buds and Babies, by Christina G. Rossetti.] 2. Candelo is a small town near the Bega River, N.S.W. Bendigo is a gold mining town (popula- tion 37,000) 100 mile north west of Melbourne. Casino is an important town on the Richmond River, N.S.W. Otago is a large province and harbour in the south Island of New Zealand Copmanhurst is a town on the Clarence River, north west of Grafton, N.S.W. Bellambi is a mining town north of Wollongong, N.S.W. Galapagos is a group of islands in the Pacific, 600 miles west of Equador, to which country it belongs. Karachi: A town at the mouth of the   Indus, in India. Mona is a river in Tasmania, flowing into the Macquarie, a tributary of the Tamar; also a passage between   Porto Rico and Hayti, from the   Atlantic to the Carribea...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 August 1899

NOTE - Letters insufficiently stamped will not be accepted. If you clip the ends of your envelope, and mark it "Examination Papers Only," it will   (assuming, of course that no letter is enclosed) come by post at the rage of 1d. for each 2ozs or fraction of 2oz. Those who write for information, and require a reply by post, should enclose a stamped, addressed envelope. Competitors under 14 may elect to compete in Class A if they so desire; and those under 11 may     compete in Class B. But competitors who thus commence to work in a higher class than their own must commence to work in that class through- out. Under no circumstance will children over 10 be allowed to compete in Class C; nor will over 13 in Classes B or C. Children who will complete their 13th or 10th years during the current half-year should work in     the Class for which their age qualifies them at the beginning of the half-year.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
QUESTIONS FOR SEPTEMBER. CLASS A: 14 to 17 years. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 August 1899

QUESTIONS FOR SEPTEMBER. CLASS A: 14 to 17 years.   1. What have you ever made with your hands? Describe it fully, and give an account of the process of manu- facture. 2, Name the authors of the following books, and give a brief account of one of them: Oliver Twist, The   Hunters of the Ozark Mountains, In the Eastern Seas, Little Women, Bubbles, Westward Ho, The Fifth Form of St. Dominics, Alice in Wonderland, Seven Little Aus- tralians, Kidnapped, Teens, Tales of a Grandfather.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CLASS B: 11, 12 and 13 Years. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 August 1899

CLASS B: 11, 12 and 13 Years.   1. Draw a map similar to that in Brooks's   4th Class Geography of the Hunter River. 2. Name your favourite character in History, and say why you prefer him (not more than 200 words).

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CLASS C. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 August 1899

CLASS C. 1. The answer to the sum is £279,620 5s. 3¾d.-rather a large farrier's bill, eh? Several girls forgot to add together the price of the 28 nails, and conten- ted themselves with stating the price of the 28th only.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MARKS. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 August 1899

MARKS. The following gained marks for ans- wers to questions in our issue of 27th June:-     CLASS A. A. McD., 27; M.W, 20; L.M. (Roma)     18; A.L., 16; K.S., 16; B.W., 8; E.W.,       15; N.U., 7; C.H., 8; A.B. (Torsonce), 13; A.S. (Wagga), 18; A.C., 9; G.A.   (Torsconce), 7; C.S. (Alexandria), 12; H.S. (Myra Vale), 18; I.H.A., 16; L.M., 12; O.H., 17; J.B. (Hillston), 12;       M.T., 13; A.S. (Torsonce), 12; H.L.T., 18, A.G.C., 12; P.D., 12; L.E.B. 14; G.A. (Mullumbimby), 16; N.C. 16; L.O., 14; E.W., 5; M.B., 19; I.J.B. 18; E.B. (Torsonce), 7; M.F.C., 16; W. McK., 15; A.C. (Raymond Terrace), 13; F.E.W., 14; B.A.P., 12.   CLASS B. E.P. (Blayney), 16; M.R., 9; N.S.R.,     9; J.C., 20; C.S., 10; L.E., 15; L.P.,       10; H.F., 15; S.F.E., 14; J. McM., 8; &nbsp...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 August 1899

Owing to an unfortunate oversight in registering marks, N.M.F. was not credited with some of lier marks. Her total for the last half-year was 147, and she should have been bracketed with O.P. equal for second place. E.F. should   have been credited with 119 marks. Class III. should therefore read:-   1. Mary Butt, Bongongolong, Gundagai; 2. Nina M. Fraser, Sondelburnie, Gil- gandra, and Violet Pettengell, P.S., Bendemer; 4. W. H. Scott, Chester-   street, Moree; 5. Eleanor French,   Cootamundra. Prizes have now been forewarded as follows: -   CLASS II. - 1. Myrtle Turland, "Bub- bles, His Book;" 2. Jessie McMarter,   Scholars' Companion; 3. Hubert James,   Scholars' Companion; 4. K. A. Willis,   pocket pencil; 5. Winnie Gilroy, pocket   pencil. CLASS III. - Mary Butt, "Bubbles, His Book;" 2. Nina M. Fraser, Violet   Pettingall, set Brooks's Histories; 3. ...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE AUSTRALIAN OF THE FUTURE. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 August 1899

THE AUSTRALIAN OF THE FUTURE. MR. OSCAR BROWNING, the best-known living authority on English school life, has stated his opinion that the average youth of today gives his entire thought and his whole conversation to games. "His path of education progress   is marked out by fences and sign- posts; the road is macadamised with guide and extract books, and made smooth and easy by marks and examinations. Nothing is left to his own enterprise and ingenuity, he can always tell exactly where he is, and is sure to receive at the end of the measured mile the applause of his approving backers. He knows how to get up anything. he   is convinced that the whole duty of life is to be doing something, that is, to be going in for some competition. To sit in a chair and read a book is laziness in his eyes." And the result is that whilst he is far superior in manliness and vigour to a Frenchman, or an Italian or a German, is far   inferior in steady, persevering...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FANCY WORK. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 August 1899

FANCY WORK. BY MRS. ERNEST FAVENC. I can quite imagine directly most of you look at the illustration given, your exclamations of "Call that fancy work!"     but I assure you, unless you can do all this kind of sewing neatly and easily, you will never shine at other needle-   work. Now, in these days of sewing machines, plain needlework is becoming one of the last arts to a certain extent. Perhaps a few of you have ever tried to make a sampler of old-fashioned stitch- ing, tucking, hemming, and button- holing. I hope you will try. and I should be very glad if you would show me the results of your work. All the stitches given here are used in embroidery, and there are two, the herringbone and the single coral stitch with which you may adorn the edges of your samplers. I am not asking you to work only at the samplers, but give you directions for a Crochet Collar; it is very simple, and   had a very lacey effect. With the least knowled...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CHATTER PAGE EDITOR'S NOTE. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

HÄTTE» fi EDITOR'S NOTE. We want to encourage our little friends to Bend us short, chatty letters on matters of general interest. Every month we will print a page of the best, and ¡it the end of the year give a prize for the best letter sent in. The points on which it will gain a place will be composition and subject. Any letters not for publication should be headed PRIVATE. Dear Editor, -A very unusual thing happened last night. We had snow -a thing that we never had before. Between five and six it began to snow, and lasted to between six and seven. It snowed a little between eight and nine, but not much. It was about two inches deep on the ground, and it was the first snow any of us had ever seen, except mother and father. I had great fun, and made three snow men. It was little sister Winnie's sixth birthday. She would not stay in the house, because she said the snow was sent for her birthday. The cattle and horses did not know what to make of it, one horse especially-a grey one. ...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

It trikes a pound of scoured wool to make a yard of cloth (28Ù1. wide), and lilh.-. of greasy to make the saine quan- tity. The greasy is better to send to the mills than the scoured, because it's less trouble in the long run if scoured in their own way.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BUYING A CAMEL [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

IN his very interesting book, " With Kitchener to Khartum," Mr. (x. W. Steevens gives this account of his purchase of a pair of camels " I got to Assouan and there a new trial awaited mc. 1 had no camels and it would he absurd to go to the Soudan without camels. Now I knew nothing at all about the points of a camel, nor of its market price, nor what it eats, nor could I ride it. However, camels had to be bought, and I borrowed an interpreter and went out to the Bisharin Village, outside Assouan, and bought some. The interpreter said he knew all about camels and that the}" were worth £27 a pair. "First, though, tiley had to be tried. The Bisharin were all standing about grouped round little heaps of dry cracked mud, which it took a moment's considera- tion to recognise as their houses. Their costume consisted mainly of their hair in little tight plaits tumbling every way over their heads ; they have it done thus in infancy, and never take it out of curl : it looks like the inside hai...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Football. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

Football. On the 12th instant, ai the Syd. Cricket (¡round, the Grammar School de feated The King's School in the final for the Schools' Premiership by 12 to 5. The full record of the results for the Schools' Premiership is as follows : S.O.S. T.K.S. N.C. St. J. Pts. S.G.S. .. 15-0 9-0 34-4 - 3-8 8-0 8-7 - 12-5 - -24 T.K.S. .. 0.16 - 13-8 0-0 8-3 - 19-0 26-3 5-12 - 20 X.C. .. 0-9 8-13 - 10-0 0-8 0-19 - 0-9 4 St. J. .. 4-34 6-9 0-10 7-8 3-26 9-0 - 4

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Athletics. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

Athletics. At the Public Schools' sports, held at the Agri- cultural Ground on Fri dav, loth inst., the most important event. the 100 yards N. S. W. Public Schools' Championship, was won by W. Ross, Fort-street, in ll 2-Ö seconds ; H. Moore, Fort-street, 2. Thc winner won his heat in ll seconds. \V. buchanan, S.G.S. won the b~>0 yards All Schools' Handicap. George Smith, who, it will be remem- bered, was a member of thc last New Zealand football team, will compete at the Australasian Championship meeting, to be held in brisbane in November. I learn from New Zealand that the crack three-quarter stood out of all the inter provincial matches, which goes to show thai he means business. He i- a very fleet young fellow, and should givea good account of himself. The annual gathering of the Clarence River Public Schools' Amateur Athletic Association was held at Elizabeth Island on Wednesday, last. Nearly the whole of the schools on the river wo e repre- sented. Five hundred children took...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

EPPS'S Will make Young Australians Strong and Healthy COCOA

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Out-door Sports. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

Out-door Sports, [BY " OBSERVER."] [The Sports Editor will be glad to receive notes of school sports for inclusion in this column, awl is prepared to answer any questions concerning the game of cricket.]

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TAM O'SHANTER FOR A DOLL IN CROCHET. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

TAM O'SHANTER FOR A DOLL IN CROCHET. Materials required : Berlin wool and a bone crochet hook. Make a chain of 5 stitches and join in a ring ; work single crochets over the ring until the ring is covered. Then work round and round throngh the stitches, widening often to make the work lie flat, until there are ti rows ; 1 more row of double crochet, taking care i<> widen it : 4 more rows of single crochet, then 1 more row of double crochet ; next a row of single crochet; after which work ll rows of single crochel narrowing often-that is, ski]) 1 crochet here and there-to keep the work Hat, like the top of a cap. It is now ready for the head band. Make a row of single crochet and then a row of double (.rochet until the band is wide enough ; finish with a row of single crochet ; then through a row of the double crochet round tne band, iain rib- bon and tie in a bow. The top of the cap needs a tassel of the wool.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FANCY WORK. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 September 1899

FANCY WORK. By MRS. ERNEST FAVENC. If you have not already seen this decoration for tray cloths or sideboard cloths I am sure you will bc delighted with it ; it is most simple and inex- pensive. The material is just the red lined linen tea towelling, and the thread red ingrain cotton. First there is a hem- stitched hem, and if you feel inclined you might elaborate on this by working a drawn thread hem with a little pattern, instead of the plain hemstitch. You then work in the lines of coral stitching, and these must be straight and evenly worked. Next you put the lines in for the spiderweb, carry each tincad over as far as it will go, instead of completing one square first. These lines must not be dragged nor too loose, and when all are filled in a square you will notice a little cross that holds each thread. From the centre you pass up the needle, with a fair length of thread, to avoid having a join, and collect the eight lines in a bunch, making a firm knot ; then darn round for t...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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