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Elephind.com contains 8,145 items from Grenville Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Smythesdale News. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 April 1915

Smythesdale News. Mr R. Mnrpby, P.M., and Mr P. Dalton and Mr M. M'Menamin, J'sP., occupied tbe Bench in the Police Court on Tuesday. Constable W. A. Youdan proceeded against S. Cracknell for non yaccinatiou of a child over six months of age. A fine of £2 was recorded. A stay of seven days was granted. Joseph Dean, an officer of the Railway Depart ment, proceeded against J. Stapleton and J. Byrne,' for interfering with fellow passengers, between Nintinbool and Berringa on 31st January last. Mr M. Lazarus defended. The case against J. Stapleton was withdrawn, and J. Byrne was fined £1 and £3 2 Is costs. A stay of seven days was granted. A Government grant of £10 has been made to the Snivthesdale Free Library.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HER SACRIFICE. I. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 April 1915

HER SACRIFICE. i. David Lilley came in quietly, bad his tea, and took his newspaper to the great easy-chair and began to read. Mrs. Lilley watched him with lov ing, wistful eyes. She was his mother, and she loved him as the only thing left to her. Nothing concerning him missed her keen eye^, and she knew by his quiet attitude that something bigger than usual was troubling him. Restlessly she moved her fingers, then finally wound up .her wool, tucked the needles in the ball, and put it away. Then she came across to him and, sit ting on the hassock at his side, pos sessed herself qf one of his hands. He smiled down at her. What a little bit of a thing she was to be his mother, he thought. What a darling she had been, the best little woman in all the world! And yet she was stop ping him now, unwillingly, perhaps, from his great des_ire. "Boy, you're miserable," she said at last. She had kissed each finger separately with her sweet, soft mouth. She had laid her cheek with so much of the...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 April 1915

Queen Alexandra Inspects EVlotor Ambulances, and Names one after Herself. Eleven of the latest design motor-car ambulances, and a motor transport lorry, with 100 well-trained officers, have been despatched to the battle's front. The last six cars just put into commission have been built to special pattern to enable them to negotiate roads that no other type of car can traverse, and so get up nearer to the fighting line than any other. These cars take four stretch ers, and are specially constructed for the conveyance of the more serionsly injured, being fitted with the latest improve ments. Tremendous applause greeted the an nouncement recently made at a great gathering in London by General Booth, that Queen Alexandra had consented to inspect the cars at Marlborough House, and name one after herself. Without regard to the rights and wrongs of the war, the Salvation Army feels that it is on sure ground in doing all it can do to soothe the sorrows and heal the wounds of those who fall ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Our Boys in Egypt. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 April 1915

Our Boys in Egypt. We extract the following from a letter received by Mr S. Donaldson from Sig naller J. Whitney, who is with our troops in Egypt:— " Viewing the whole of the Australian forces in Egypt, the defaulters are only about 8 per cent. Further, the report of Capt. Bean is not correct, for some of the men returning home in company of the wasters are classed with them, which is very unfair. I know several young chaps who are deeply grieved at the re port ; and as regards the troops' con duct at Cairo, the leading townsmen maintain that they are the best behaved of any ever stationed there. They are delighted with the Australians. I ven ture to repeat the words of a CJ.O., that no other troops in the world could adapt themselves better to the conditions than our boys in Egypt. " Since I wrote last I have been to the front. We were awakened early in the morning ; inarching orders for Is mailia. We arrived there at 9 p.m., and went into camp adjoining the New Zealanders. No tent...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TOMBSTONES. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 April 1915

TOMBSTONES. "The first time- I saw the young French soldiers on the battle line," writes Estelle Klauder, "I said to my self: " 'What well-got-up young fellows they are; they all wear wrist watches.' "But a closer look showed me that what I took for wrist watches were, in reality, 'plaques'—white discs like a watch face, set in black leather brace lets, which gave each young soldier's name, age, number, residence, regi ment, and so forth. If he should be killed the plaque would be cut from the soldier's wrist and sent in to head quarters, and thus accurate lists of the slain would be compiled. These plaques are called by their wearers tombstones."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOT WATER AS A CURATIVE. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 April 1915

HOT WATER AS A CURATIVE. - A valuable remedy for many ail ments is hot water, applied external ly, but it must be very hot. It will ease pain and, for instance, will re duce the swelling of a sprain. In ternally it is quite as useful, because it flushes!out the stomach and clears it of its mucus secretion in cases of indigestion, and because it also ef fects a decided action on the kidneys. A person troubled with acidity should drink two tumblerfuls of hot water about two hours after a meal and re peat this dose at bedtime.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
II [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 April 1915

II. "Oil, mother, you are really well enough? You really mean, it?' Tlie joy in lier son's face was reward enough for all she was doing. She felt she did not care so long as David did what he wanted. She laughed. "He said I was a bit of a humbug for keeping you for such a little thing. Oh, I told him about you. He was so nice and kind. You can go with a clear conscience. God bless you, boy, for staying with your mother." She smiled at him tenderly. Her big boy, who even now she could never believe was grown-up. Again she felt his curly head under her fingers, as it used to be, so short a time ago. A pang of keenest agony went through her as she wished that he had not grown up, but had remained young and—hers! Yet she was proud, too, to give him up to England. "So you want me to go, mother?" Dr.vid's grave voice broke in upon her thoughts. He knelt at her side and looked at her; there was a gleam of a tear in his eyes. "Brave little , moth er!" he said, softly. "Indeed, I want you to...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Somewhat Indefinite. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 April 1915

Somewhat Indefinite. Higgs met a man, and while not re membering who he was, but feeling certain that he was acquainted with him, held out his hand and said, "I am sure I have met you somewhere!" "No doubt," was the reply. "I have been there often!" A woman who would drop from ex haustion after sweeping a roota could shop all day and go to a dance the same night.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
II [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 April 1915

II. Lady Betty looked round in amaze ment when she alighted at her destin ation. The fact that George's mother lived in a cottage hadn't aroused her curiosity one little bit, for the simple reason that she was aware that quite large houses are designated "cot tages" sometimes; but on catching her first glimpses of Woodbine Cottage she was not only astonished but a little dismayed. It was a small, double-fronted house, the windows and curtains of which were scrupulously neat and clean; and j it stood far back from the road, at the end of a sloping garden that made a brave show of richly-hued dahlias and j ragged chrysanthemums—just the kind of cottage and garden, Betty mused, that might be occupied by her father's lesser tenantry on his estate. ' Of course, there must be some mis take. But she could, at any rate, make inquiries here. The rain had ceased when she walk ed up the gravelled path bordered on [either side by trim-cut box. She reach ed the jasmine-covered porch and rais ed ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GEORGE'S MOTHER. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 April 1915

GEORGE'S MOTHER. Lady Betty Moreland stood by the wide window overlooking the park that surrounded her ancestral home, and regarded the rain-swept prospect with an absent look in her large, dark eyes. A dull, leaden November sky formed a chill and forbidding background against which the naked branches of the fine old trees swayed mournfully in the bitter east wind and dripped moisture on to the sodden ground be low; but Betty Moreland was in no degree affected by the discomforts of tho weather. It is doubtful even if she saw—except sub-consciously— the dreary scene on which she looked, for her thoughts on this particular morning were wholly and entirely ab sorbed by the man to whom she was betrothed, and ever and again she would glance back over her shoulder to where he stood chatting with a lit tle group of men at the far end of the room. A tall, fine, soldierly-looking man, with something strong and pur-j poseful about him that singled him'j out among the rest. j Frankly, Betty wa...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"BANTAMS" AND "OLD BUCKS." [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 April 1915

"BANTAMS" AND "OLD BUCKS." I am of opinion that a short man, for every purpose of life, is as good as, if not better than, a tall man. A man of 5ft., in good health, makes just as good a soldier as anybody else.—Lord Rosebery. The soldierly spirit of little men is strikingly illustrated by the fact that, after raising two battalions of "Ban tams" at Birkenhead, recruiting has had to be stopped. Originally it was intended to form one battalion of 5ft. men, but little men who are too small for Kitchener's army came forward in such numbers that the "War Office sanctioned the formation of a second battalion. A bantam cock, which was offered by a Scotch Devon lady poultry breed er, and thankfully accepted by Mr. A. Bigland, who originated the move ment for recruiting little men, is to be the mascot of the "Bantams" batta lions, and the quartermaster is prepar ing a pen at headquarters in which to lodge the regimental pet. The new battalions are not behind in the matter of a regimental so...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW TO GET FIT. Hints on Muscle Training for Boys. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 April 1915

HOW TO GET FIT. Hints on Muscle Training for Boys. The great mistake made by many parents in regard to physical training for their hoys is the providing of elaborate apparatus for the de velopment of limbs and muscles. Lads, of course, are very fond of dumb-bells, bar-bells, punching'-balls, developers, and other aids to physical exercise, and these are all right when used at the proper age and under the guidance of an experienced teacher. The first training for the muscles of a boy, however, is best performed with out any apparatus whatever. Violent motions are quite unnecessary. With apparatus there is always a danger of the boy over-exerting himself in order to perform certain feats, and great harm has often been done by over I exercise. The first essential to the proper physical development of a boy is to teach him how to breathe correctly, and the following simple exercise will be found very beneficial. For Breathing. Stand straight, with heels together, and raise arms straight...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A LESSON IN PERSONAL HYGIENE. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 April 1915

a lesson in personal hygiene. The Russian-Japanese war (says an American physician) taught a valu able lesson in personal hygiene. The habit of extreme personal cleanliness among the Japanese was an import ant factor in maintaining the health and resistance of Japan's troops. The Japanese troops kept their bodies clean by frequent bathing, and their rule of never going into battle with out putting on clean underwear great ly reduced the danger of infection from wounds. The Japanese rations also had much to do with keeping the men in good condition. These gener ally consisted of some rice, com pressed fish, army biscuit, salted plums, and a juicy pickle all neatly packed in a small tin box and wrap ped in a towel. The Russian was fed on soup frequently made from ques tionable meat, and this has been held responsible for the large proportion of intestinal disorders on the Russian side. While to-day the war machinery is more deadly, the number of killed and wounded in percentages remai...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
III [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 April 1915

III. Nine o'clock in the library at Moreland Park. A blazing log-fire was sending leaping flames up the wide old chimney, and within the area lighted by its warm, ruddy glow stood Betty, looking up into the face of the maii she loved. "I want to tell you about a woman who is very precious to me," the man was saying; "the best and the dear est " "Where do I come in?" interposed Betty,' swiftly, with a bewitching smile. A smile touched George Langdale's lips, but the girl noticed that his face was very white. "The best and dearest of mothers," he continued, emphasising the last word. Betty gave a well-affected start. "You've never mentioned your mother to me," she said, quickly. "No; but your father knows her, and—and perhaps I ought to have told you about her before—I can't ex actly explain why I didn't. I think, perhaps, it was because she is so very precious to me and I couldn't be sure how you'd take her, so I kept putting it off. You see, Betty, darl ing, if you marry me, I want ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SCIENCE MADE EASY. Puzzling Problems Solved at Home. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 April 1915

SCIENCE MADE EASY. Puzzling Problems Solved at Home. Why does a piano sneeze? Why does a whip crack? Why do bits of fluff come off the end of the -whip when you crack it? Why does a cric ket bat sting? Why ? But one 1 might ask dozens of such questions, dealing with little problems of every day life, which would puzzle not a few people. Boys and girls, however, who have been listening to Professor C. V. Boys' juvenile lectures at the Royal Insti tution will have no difficulty in ex plaining these scientific mysteries. They will tell you, for instance, on the authority of Professor Boys him self, that if, after pressing the right pedal on a piano, you sing to it, it will sing back to you, and if yoi sneeze, the piano will also sneezo, simply because of the sympathetic vi bration which exists between yourself and the wires. Again, a whip cracks for the saKi3 reason that a bullet sings or a she'll whistles or whines. It is a matter cf speed or velocity. When a thini moves rapidly throu...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GREY-HAIRED GENERALS. They Have Replaced Young Commanders. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 April 1915

GREY-HAIRED GENERALS. They Have Replaced Young Commanders. Generals are no longer expected to personally lead their men into battle like warriors of old; tlieir place is now the headquarters base, several miles behind the fighting line, where they keep in touch with the troops by means of telephone, telegraphy, and wireless. For this reason the modern commander is more often than not grey-headed and well on in years, ma ture judgment and experience taking the place of the great energy and reck less courage supposed to be the dis tinguishing marks of the military lead ers of the past. In the present cam paign nearly every important comman der is over sixty years of age. Lord Kitchener is sixty-four, General Sir John French is sixty-two, and the French leaders Pau and Joffre are both approaching seventy. Germany's generals are mostly men who so successfully brought victory for their country during the Franco Prussian war of 1870; thus they are by no means young. General Von Kluck is s...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Tennis. SCARSDALE V. SEBASTOPOL. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 April 1915

SCARSDALE Y. SEBASTOPOL. A most exciting and enjoyable game was played between these two teams on Monday afternoon on the Scarsdale Court. The weather was everything one could desire, and the visitors, who were well represented, were only defeated in the last set by one game. The following were the scores :— Boyack and Miss Borden beat Evans and Miss Pender, 6—4. Hill and Miss Abbott beat Borden and Miss Kyle, 6—0. Misses M'Kay and Forrester beat ■Misses Kyle and Frazer, 6—5. Richards and Miss Bluett beat Young and Miss Forrester, 6—0. Boyack and Richards beat Evans and Till, 6—4. Misses Borden and Bluett beat Miss Pender and Abbott. 6—2. Young and Miss M'Kay beat Borden, Young, and Till, 6—4. Richards and Miss Frazer beat Anderson and Miss Forrester, 6—5. Anderson and Evans beat Richards and Bordern, 6—1. Boyack and Miss Bluett beat Till and Miss Abbott, 6—6. Misses Kyle and Borden beat Misses M'Kay and Pender, 6—5. Anderson and Evans beat Boyack and Borden, 6—3. Total games—Scarsd...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Dr. Fitchett's Brilliant War Articles. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 April 1915

Br. Fiifltett's Brilliant War Bnicies. In the May issue, just to hand, " Life," our leading Australasian magazine, gives the most adequate and most picturesque review of the progress of the great war of any magazine, either local or imported. This is due chiefly to the fact Dr. Fitchett—the author of '• Deeds That Won the Empire"—is writing exclusively for " Life." In a series of fine special articles Dr. | Fitchett deals with the whole situation j n a magnificent manner, treating first the new stage in the war which has been icreated by the approach of spring ; second, the sea affairs for the month ; third, the humours and heroisms of men in the trenches ; fourth, the " white washing feats attempted by Germany ; and lastly, the performances of German " Kultur " as described by Germans themselves. Not a reader who wishes to keep abreast of the war should miss these articles. These sections in " Life " it might be added, are illus trated with the pick of rhe photographs and drawings ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
KINDLY LORD ROBERTS. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 1 May 1915

KINDLY LORD ROBERTS. A certain Colonel, on returning vic torious from one of those difficult fron tier expeditions which attract small notice at home, came into the chief's office to report the result of his opera tions, writes Maud Diver in the "Corn hill Magazine." "Bobs," who was very busy at the moment, merely remarked: — "I'm writing my despatches. They are nearly done." But before they were done he looked up again, "Well —how did the affair go off?" The Colonel, in plain, soldierly lan guage, told his tale, and the general nodded, well pleased. "Good—very good. Very well done," he said, and added, with his kindest smile, "Now, I'm sending a telegram to my wife. Wouldn't you like to send just one word to yours? She will be anxious." The Colonel's gratitude may be ima gined, and the thing was done. There were more despatches to write; but "Bobs," who could think of a wife's anxiety, could also think of the hus band's immediate need. I "You've had a hard day of it," he said, "and...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE HOUSEHOLD. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 1 May 1915

THE HOUSEHOLD. Rabbit with Macaroni.—Clean and joint the rabbit and brown it lightly all over in a little dripping melted in a stewpan. Brown also a sliced onion with it> ..sprinkling in a teaspoonful oi' sugar. Cover with warm water; add, tied in muslin, two or three pepper corns, a strip of lemon peel, one clove, a sprig of parsley, and, if you have it, one small bayleaf. Simmer slowly for two hours. Have ready a teacup ful of macaroni, broken small, and boiled apart; also have a tablespoon ful of grated cheese. When the rab bit is done remove the herbs, stir in the cheese, and carefully add the ma caroni. If necessary pour in a little hot water; season with salt, boil at once, and serve. Cold Meat Salad.—Take about'half a pound of any cold meat you happen to have at hand, one pound of cold boiled potatoes, one small cooked beet root, a little sugaj, oil, vinegar, pepper and dry mustard, two hard-boiled eggs, one dessert-spoonful of onion juice, vWo tablespoonfuls of parsley, f...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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