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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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A HUMAN EAR. ITS MARKET VALUE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

A HUMAN EAR. ITS MARKET VALUE. The market price for a healthy human ear is   £60, according to a published advertisement by   Dr. Elmer E. Prescott, a skin-grafting specialist     of Chicago, who, early in November, desired two   ears for an unusual operation he wished to per- form.     He had already received two offers. One was     from a paralytic, 60 years old, and the other from   a cripple of half that age. Both men declared   they needed the cash more than the ear. The   paralytic said:—   "I would consider it an act of charity if you   would pay me that money; my family needs it,   and as I am near death my loss will not be   material."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AIR SHIPS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

AIR SHIPS. An enthusiastic Frenchman has said that the   fleets of the world—especially the British fleet—     are now reduced to scrap iron. He meant to   imply that the airship has killed the water ship.   All his countrymen do not go so far as this, but   the rage for airships in Paris continues to grow   into greater extravagancies.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A WOMAN'S AIR SHIP. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

A WOMAN'S AIR SHIP. America does not produce the only new women   in the world. Russia, for instance, boasts among the more prominent women an aerial navigator. Miss Clara Polzky is the young woman who has chosen this singular line of distinction, and she has succeeded so well in it as to attract Imperial attention. At a recent "dress rehear- sal" of her flying machine the Czarina herself was present. Scientists in every country are wondering at the constructive genius of the young Russian girl who has designed an air machine on original lines. Her machine consists of an egg-shaped air- ship just opened at the top, and fitted at the base with an electric motor apparatus. Accom-   panied by a little girl, Miss Polzky ascended to a height of about 60 yards at a recent exhibition, a sail spreading gracefully as she rose in the air. After remaining there poised for a while she descended in her ship, proving that it was perfectly amenable to control. Miss Polzky...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The World's OLDEST MAN AND OLDEST WOMAN. HOBBIES OF CENTENARIANS. SOME INTERESTING INCIDENTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

The World's OLDEST MAN   —♦—   AND OLDEST WOMAN.   HOBBIES OF CENTENARIANS. SOME INTERESTING INCIDENTS. Who are the oldest man and woman alive?   The committee on vital statistics of the Hun- dred Year Club, after months of prying into this   problem, is ready to announce the result of its   discoveries.   The oldest man alive to-day, according to this   research, is Izal Rodofsty, of Moscow, Russia,   aged 136. His case is reported to the club by   Dr. Joseph Jernossky, of Moscow. Rodofsty re-   tains good eyesight, but poor hearing. He was   never known to suffer an illness, has used liquor,   but not tobacco. He comes of a long-lived fam-   ily, his father dying at 120.   The most aged woman of to-day, so far as the   committee can discover, is Mrs. Nancy Holli- &nbsp...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A WOMAN'S FRIENDSHIP. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

A WOMAN'S FRIENDSHIP.     It is a wondrous advantage to a man, in every   pursuit or vocation, to secure an adviser, in a   sensible woman (says a thoughtful writer).   In woman there is at once a suitable delicacy   of tact and a plain soundness of judgment which   are rarely combined to an equal degree in man.   A woman, if she is really your friend, will   have a sensitive regard for your character,   honor, and repute.   She will seldom counsel you to do a shabby   thing, for a woman friend always desires to be   proud of you. At the same time, her constitu-   tional timidity makes her more cautious than   your male friend. She therefore seldom counsels   you to do an imprudent thing. A man's best   female friend is a wife of good sense and good   h...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
KING AND HIS MOTHER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

KING AND HIS MOTHER. An admirable trait in the character of the King of Italy is his wonderful affection for his mother, with whom he is said never to have had a single misunderstanding. As Prince of Naples the King was a great traveller, yet no matter in what part of the world he was, he never al- lowed a day to pass without despatching a long telegram to the Queen, informing her of his doings.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PRINCESS ROYAL. WILL THE DUCHESS OF FIFE BE ACCORDED THIS HONOR? [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

PRINCESS ROYAL.   WILL THE DUCHESS OF FIFE BE   ACCORDED THIS HONOR?   It is reported that Princess Louise, Duchess of Fife, having now by the death of the Empress Frederick become Princess Royal of England, her husband (the Duke of Fife) will be still fur- ther ennobled, so as to bring his status more into line with that of his wife. But the question is, Has the Duchess become Princess Royal? A "Morning Leader" represen- tative has asked the question at the College of Arms, and the Windsor Herald (Mr. W. A. Lind- say, K.C.) was kind enough to reply. "If she had," he said, "we should have received the warrant to be registered or recorded. But noth- ing of the sort has reached us." And again, is there not a theory that the eldest daughter of the Sovereign cannot succeed to the honor in question unless she be born during the sovereignty of her father (or mother)? Mr. Lindsay admits that he has heard of this theory, but he doubts if it is correct....

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WOMEN AS WITNESSES. U.S. JUDGE SAYS THEY CANNOT DIAGNOSE DRINK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

WOMEN AS WITNESSES. U.S. JUDGE SAYS THEY CANNOT DIAGNOSE DRINK. Justice Ralph Wheeler, of Bridgeport, Connec- ticut (U.S.A.), has made the interesting decision that in so far as the courts are concerned no woman can be received as a reliable witness in cases of drunkenness. Mrs. Jennie Saunders, of that city, desired a divorce from her husband, and alleged hard and continuous drinking of intoxicating liquors as a cause and ground for the separation. Her wit- nesses were two ladies living near the Saunders' home, and the judge refused to accept their testi- mony as of any value whatsoever when the ques- tion of a man'c intoxication was at issue. As both women were married, and had had some extended experience with husbands themselves, it was thought that they might have been able to form some idea whether Saunders was suffer- ing from lobster salad, a sudden sunstroke, or whether he had indeed been dallying with the cup which cheers but to inebriate. But the judge declared otherwise,...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE THINGS THAT COUNT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

THE THINGS THAT COUNT. "As we adorn our houses," says "M.A.P.," "we should also take care of the proper appear- ance of our bodies. That is not to say or think that all men and women should become special- ists. But if it has become part of our modern education to know enough of art and literature to discriminate with satisfaction between the good and the bad, why should not everybody be taught also something of the art of physical adornment? Don't forget to take care of the small things that are as the marginal illustra- tions of one's character. Everybody nowadays can go to a good tailor's or dressmaker's and borrow from the taste of the humble geniuses who toil there a coat of perfect fit or a dress of ravishingly quiet elegance. But it is as the watch-chain, fan, eye-glass, card-case, stud, or rings that I await my man or woman of taste and good breeding. Also, married people ought never to allow themselves to be caught in slovenliness by the ever-watchful eye of their helpmates...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Gun Explosion. ON THE ROYAL SOVEREIGN. AN EYE-WITNESS' PATHETIC ACCOUNT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

The Gun Explosion. ON THE ROYAL SOVEREIGN. —#— AN EYE-WITNESS' PATHETIC ACCOUNT. In "The World's News" of December 21 full   particulars were given of the disastrous gun ex-   plosion on H.M.S. Royal Sovereign, of the Medi-   terranean station. A correspondent, writing to   the "Malta Times" on November 15, gives the   following additional and pathetic particulars:—   "I had only just gone down at about 11 a.m.,   when I felt a trembling of the ship. Although   usual on such an occasion, it seemed to precede   the discharge, which was not of the ordinary   character. I had no grounds whatever for ap-   prehension, beyond an impression that something   was wrong.   "I turned and went up, when to my astonish-   ment I observed a hurrying to the spot, which was enveloped in smoke. The outline of the disaste...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
EXPENSES OF ROYAL HOUSE MOVING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

EXPENSES OF ROYAL HOUSE MOVING. Contrary to the general opinion (says "M.A.P."), the expense of the many changes made necessary by the Queen's death in the various Royal residences will not be paid by the State. All the changes in Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle have to be paid for out of the King's own pocket, for while they belong to the Government the reigning monarch occu- pies them only on a life lease, rent free, and it is understood distinctly that any interior repairs have to be made at the occupant's expense. Sandringham, Osborne, and Balmoral are the private property of the Royal family, and the King can do as he likes with them, inside and outside, and pay accordingly.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A SUICIDAL ENTERTAINMENT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

A SUICIDAL ENTERTAINMENT. A strange story comes from China of the pub- lic suicide of a Chinese woman at Foo Chow. She resolved on the deed after the death of her husband, and informed the public of her inten- tion. The Taotai endeavored to prevent her, and on account of the typhoon and floods the suicide was twice postponed, but all efforts failed to divert the woman from her purpose, and, be- decked in her finest clothes, she publicly hanged herself on a platform before which stood several hundred spectators

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
JOHANN STRAUSS'S TOMBSTONE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

JOHANN STRAUSS'S TOMBSTONE.       The striking memorial monument here shown has been erected over the grave of the Waltz King, Johann Strauss, and was recently un- veiled in the presence of representatives of all the chief Vienese musical societies, and a large number of the best-known Austrian com- posers. The monument, which is a very beautiful   work, is the creation of the well-known sculptor   Johannes Beuk. —"Graphic."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
REMARKABLE ONE-MAN COMPANY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

REMARKABLE ONE-MAN COMPANY. A recent winding-up case before the official   receiver shows how easily a company fraud may   be engineered by a person who knows how to   use our company machinery, and has no scruples   as to his methods. The promoter of this fiasco   was, from beginning to end, the company, as   sisted by half-a-dozen aliases. He kept things   going by collecting capital from the sharehold-   ers, and when that was used up by increasing the   capital from £5000 to £30,000, and paying a 10   per cent. dividend out of it. Then, when neces-   sity required it, he raised it to £50,000. He is-   sued false balance-sheets, with imaginary re-   serves and non-existent properties. So the com-     pany lived on for ten years. But where were     the shareholder...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN AUTO-MOBILE RECORD. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

AN AUTO-MOBILE RECORD.   M. Fournier, the French auto-mobile expert,   says the New York correspondent of the "York-   shire Post," raced his machine over a mile course   one Sunday recently in 51 4-5sec, establishing a world's record. He used a 40 horse-power-engine,   worked by gasoline, and easily outdistanced the   14 other participants in the contest. The racing     followed an auto-mobile parade held along the   Ocean Parkway, Brooklyn. There were 150 en-   tries, and it was the most notable gathering of   auto-mobiles that has been held in America.   There were 25,000 spectators, and the route was   gaily decorated.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PUNISHMENT TO SUIT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

PUNISHMENT TO SUIT. Captain: "Sergeant, note down Private Gras- grum—three days on bread and water for slo- venly turn-out on parade." Sergeant: "Beg pardon, Captain, that won't make the slightest difference to him—he's a vegetarian." Captain: "What? Then put him for three days on meat and soup."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BURIED ALIVE. £8000 DAMAGES OBTAINED IN A FRENCH COURT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

BURIED ALIVE.       £8000 DAMAGES OBTAINED IN A   FRENCH COURT.   An extraordinary story is reported from Pauil- lac (France). A Mme. Bobin arrived there on board the steamer La Plata from Senegal. She was sup- posed to be suffering from yellow fever, and was transferred to the Lazaret by order of the officer of health. There she became worse, and apparently died. The body became rigid, and the face ashen and corpse-like, and in that condition she was buried. The nurse, however, had noticed that the body was not cold, and that there was tremulousness of the muscles of the abdomen, and expressed the opinion that Mme. Bobin was prematurely buried. On this being reported to Mme. Robin's father, he had the body exhumed, when it was found that a child had been born in the coffin. The autopsy showed also that Mme. Bobin had not contracted yellow fever, and had died from as- phyxiation in the coffin. A suit was begun against ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SHOULD MAYORS BE PAID? [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

SHOULD MAYORS BE PAID?           Sir Albert Rollit, writing as chairman of the   Municipal Corporations' Association to "Black   and White," expresses the opinion that Mayors   should be allowed a moderate grant, and pro-   ceeds:—   "I say moderate, but I do not forget that in   such things parsimony is not economy. Still,   no one wishes to restore the old regime of the   alderman who is fond of his dinner, and does not   get thinner; of City portraits and pictures said   to have been varnished with turtle soup; or of   that love of display which induced a certain   Mayor, who was also an Admiral, to write to   the Admiralty to ask whether, on the occasion of   some local function, it would be the right thing   for him to wea...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MINERS' SAFETY LAMPS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

MINERS' SAFETY LAMPS. Many improvements in detail have been made in the safety lamp since Sir Humphrey Davy found that flame would not pass through fine wire gauze. The dim light of the old Davy lamp made it disliked by the miner, who pre- ferred a better light to work by even at more risk. A good degree of illumination was soon secured without tampering with the safety of the device, but the miner still required protec- tion against himself. With familiarity came the inevitable contempt   of peril, and if he could open his lamp to light the tempting cutty, no con- sideration of prudence stayed him. Hence arose the necessity of locking the lamp before delivering it to the miner, and mak- ing it impossible for him to open it surreptitiously. The best of these locking devices is that of Messrs. E. Thomas and Williams, of Aberdare, South Wales. The Cambrian lamp of this firm locks automatically, and can only be opened by means of an air pump which, of course, is not access...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ANOTHER "ELIJAH." [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

ANOTHER "ELIJAH."         The Rev. Mr. Sandford, who has founded a Society of the Holy Ghost in Maine (U.S.A.), has come forward as Elijah II., which makes two Elijahs now in the field, the Rev. Mr. Dowie having assumed the title some months ago. The new prophet, who claims the power of casting out devils, has invaded New York on a proselytising campaign. He baptised eight peo- ple in New York Bay, including a girl of seven, who screamed and fought against his holy minis- trations. After the child was dipped she had to be held before a stove for an hour before she re- covered. She was subsequently threatened with pneumonia. The Rev. Mr. Sandford was to go to Liverpool on December 4, there to carry on his propa- ganda.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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