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Elephind.com contains 4,114 items from Direct Action, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
4,114 results
Brisbane. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 February 1915

Brisbane. The first business meeting of this Local passed off on the 11th instanr. The opening was very encouraging, and a strong membership is assured. C H. Anlezark was elected secre tary and treasurer, and F. W. Bright, literary secretary. Orders have been sent to Sydney for litera ture and 'Direct Actions. '' When the organisation gets a little more weight, we will have a fight for free speech on Sunday nights. It will require 2000 men to win it. A large meeting was held in the Burn's Mnmt, on Saturday even ing, the 23rd inst. The war and its origin were analysed by ihe speakevs to a large and appreciate audience. A bad habit— the wage system. The workers have champagne ap petites, but beer cheqxie books.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Getting Some Light. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 February 1915

Getting Some Light Those of us who have been occupying our spare time for some years iu the firing line of the Class War are aware that in all industrial disputes the capitalist mouthpiece voices 'public opinion.' Public opinion or, to call things by their right name, 'capitalist opinion,' always condemns the strike leader who acts square and tells the men to keep striking until they have won. Should however the leader 'go crook,' hobnob with the boss, and advise.Af»e strikers to chuck the sponge, the capitalist press pours its foulsme eulogy over the reptile. Again, should the strikers re pudiate him as their leader, then the capitalist press informs the strikers that they are asses: 'You have disregarded the advice of your own elected leaders, you skunks, you mob,' etc. TT TV ^ As an Industrial Unionist, a Revolutionist, and a Rebel against the system of capitalist pinching, 1 am amused at the so-called and self-styled leaders of Socialist philosophy on the Continent and especiall...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Golden Mile. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 February 1915

The Golden Mile. ? » ? . — Tlie members of the ruling class, ^icli as mining magnates, bishops, ji'ilitidans of all parties, and other immoral persons, point with pride to tl.e Golden Mile of W.A. The Gol (Ini Mile is Hell: the hell of capital ism. 1 lie effect of a dying and rotten social system, based on ignorance 1 n ait on the Golden Mile. There is poverty on the Golden ilile. Men die early, are worked to death, are crushed to death, maimed, fid the fine dust cuts the lungs of miners on the Golden Mile. The huge ugly dumps that disfigure tiip landscape and fill the workers' homes with fine dust, represent so 'nidi poverty, misery, sordidness, crushed hopes, and Dividends on the Golden Mile. The mines and social system of the Golden Mile denotes a V6r^;low state of civilisation; all the features of capitalism are there. An ignorant il'd misled working class, preyed up on by conuptedly interested persons, S1»h as blatant politicians, tricked ''to time agreements by servile union l...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Fremantle. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 February 1915

!; Fremantle. ! | Despite great disadvantages, the j Jnsurrcctors of Fremaniie continue ?{ to hold their own. Members av joining up slowly, but surely. The advent of F. W. King w; s ;: sign jot renewra aruviry^ on me pin of the members. He left on th? following day with two more of the persuasion for Boulder Cit\\ and the I.W.W. Locals open-air propa ganda. There is a great need for a strops: I.W.W. movement to wake up ths Lumpers and other bonehcads. N.G.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The I.W.W. Preamble. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 February 1915

The I.W.W. Preamble. The working class and the employing class have nothing iu common. There can be no peace so long as hunger and want are found among mil lions of working people, and the few who make up the employing class have all the good things of life. Between these two classes a struggle must go on until the workers of the world organise as a class, take possession of the earth and the ma chinery of production, and abolish the wage system. We find that the centreing of the management of industries into ever-growing power of the employing class. The trade unions foster a state of affairs which allows one set of workers to be pitted against another set of workers in the same industry, thereby helping to defeat one another iu wage wars. Moreover, the trade unions aid the employ ing class to mislead the workers into the belief that the working clas9 have interests in common with their employers. These conditions can be chanegd and the interest of the working class upheld only by ...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Arbitration Chickens. Coming Home to Roost. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 February 1915

Arbitration - - - - - - Chickens. Coming Home to Boost . The latest '\iclory ' for ar'oitrri lion, thai wonderful scheme which according to Trade Union official dom, was going to ;iehitv2 wo.nl rs lor the workers, has come in the ^liapo of a 25 per cent i eduction in ihc wages of those workers employ ed in restaurants and tea-shops, etc The writer lias said more than (inc«.j that an Arbitration award was at best but a legal declaration til the hiw of supply and demand al n ;uly existing in the labor market, ;uid ihe various declarations and announcements made by Arbitra tion Court judges and clmrni *??), .Jiiu' the present economic crisis l:e L'an. prove that contention conclu sively. The Secretary of the Union to Hiich the above-mentioned v/orkors l'.'!'iiig incidentally endonj;.1;-1 this ?. ii.v: when he stated that the latest award brings the employees concern ed back to the position they occupied mx years ago, a time when the Inbor market was all that could be de ?ii^d from the ...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 February 1915

The Policeman, Judge, Soldier and Parson all live, like the Bed-bpg, on the Sweat of Others. Slow down on the Job!

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Amazing Adventures of Mr. Simple. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 February 1915

The Amazing Adventures of Mr. Simple. (1) An I.W.W. man is trying to impress upon Mr. Simple that there is nothing in common between the boss and the worker, and that sabot age is a good weapon to use. Mr. Simple is horrorstricken and says, 'For God's sake, stop, you fellows make me nervous. The bosses are all ngnt. 2. Mr. Simple is beginning to think that his job is somewhat hard, and kuowihg that he can get an easier billet, he decides to sling it in. 3. He goes to the master, and tells him that the job is killing him, that he is going to leave, and would he kindly give him a reference. The boss says he is sorry to lose such a good man, and that he will give Mr. Simple a personal reference at any time. 4. Mr. Simple gets the other job and reckons that he could work all day with his overcoat on, and not raise a sweat. He also has an idea that there was a lot in what the I.W.W. told him. 5. The two bosses have a tiddley together. Mr. Skinnen says to Mr. Fleesham: 'You'd better sack ...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"Victories." [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 February 1915

'Victories.' The Christian churches of Boulder City in common with other towns all over the English speaking world prayed for 'Victories'1 on Sunday last, January 2'. Prayed that the Allies' army might defeat the Ger man army. Victories ! What does it mean ! It   means great slaughter and carnage   on both sides. It means the tears of   widows, and cries of little children   on both sides. It means laying waste   farms and homes in all Europe.   'Victories' for the great army of   unemployed.   'Victories' won, by the groans,   the sweat, the tears, and by the   labour of the workers of all lands. Victories that do nothing but   harm, and that prove nothing.   Did the victories of Alexander, of   Hannibal, of Julius Caesar, or Napoleon, prove that their cause or   conquest, was wise or just? &nbs...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"Unionism" [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 February 1915

'Unionism' 'The One Big Union is no good How could they organise all the different industries satisfactorily? impossible!' You =will hear some of potgut's slaves saying. A little affair happened up here at Canberra last week that should convince any wage slave that ail these craft unions are to up to muck. Two '-organisers of the Builders' Laborers came on the scene una wares and claimed all builders' laborers and anyone else willing to join. They promised all kinds of concessions to anyone who joined the Union. In the meantime, the local secretary of the R.W\ and G.L. Association, which covers the Federal Capital, wired to head quarters, informing the blokes with the rosy positions of the new blood in the field. The R.W. sent an organiser along a week later to look after their interests (not ours), but by thils time the Builders' Laborers blokes had taken their departure. So the Railway Workers' organiser had to go over the same ground and calm things down to normal, and he did it ...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Emancipation. (A Mack.) [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 February 1915

Emancipation. ' ; ; ; (A Mack.) ;?? Through all the world today rings the anguished cry of a tortured and starved worker class. This same cry has rumbled along the centuries since civilisation saw its dawn; never once has that wail died away across that stretch of time. Ancient history is illumined by the d'lorls VII LUC ttUl-titIS IU SlUVKtil IUI lUClM selves the chains of their slaver., and although these dions were game and willing, they failed to achieve much for the class which suffered then, as it dots now, from a lack of intelligent self-interest and Uie organisation' necessary to gain them victory. We will, however, skip the cen turies and investigate the fight, and the methods, for freedom in our own times. A quarter of a century back the workers in this country were engag ed in bloody -economic strife with their kind and hallowed masters, just as our fathers had continuously been thousands and hundreds of years before. As was usual with them they lost (he fight, and sullen...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Deisel Engine. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 February 1915

The Deisel Engine. By Jacksoiiiku.s. The Deisel engine must in future play u most inipprl.-jni par? in ; re- production of wealth (for profit.) Quite recently a boat of 5000 tuns motored in 'our harbour,' the name of this up-to-date vessel is called the 'Annum.' As most in lflligcnl workers are aware of the I act, this new engine which is in stalled in this new vessel is the out come of economic necessity. In the first instance, far less space is taken up in the engine-room, leaving a. carrying capacity for an extra 1000 tons of cargo. If or dinary steam power propelled this vessel, 25 firemen would be em ployed, whereas at present on board of this modern ocean-going motor boat not one fireman is employed. The only 'hands' that are requ:r ed in the engine-room are four engi neers, four assistant engineers, four greasers, and one electrical engi neer. All auxilarv plant is driv-vn with the Deisel motor. This vessel can carry sufficient oii to act as ballast and fuel to pro her at the...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO LOCALS. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 February 1915

TO LOCALS. To make this paper interesting to the membership, we must have plenty of news. News can't be manufactured by the Editor. Let each local elect a correspondent, who can write brief terse accounts of activities, etc.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NEWCASTLE. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 February 1915

NEWCASTLE. ? u ? Several members of the I.W.W. including F, W. Reeve, have invad ed Newcastle, and held propaganda meetings there. Up to the present the Council have refused to give the I.W.W. speakers a permit, and there may be prospects of a fight there before long. On Saturday meeting was held, at which nearly a 'Hundred 'Direct Actions' were sold, also a large amount of litera ture. Several subs were also ob tained. Fellow-workers and' sympathisers in the Newcastle district are re quested to get in touch with the I.W.W. so that a strong and de termined local can be formed, with the intention of educating the min ers as to the only effective form of organisation. Letters are awaiting Neil White at this office.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Trouble in Newcastle. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 February 1915

Trouble in New| castle. I F.W. Reeves and Morgan h;i\e. been summoned to appear at N- \\ ' ' castle Police Court on the 17th inst ,' 1 for speaking in Perkins-street, uJ ' Newcastle, on the 5II1 Februan j The charge is that they were loile'ij \ inK ;md causing an obstruction,' 7 alter being warned by an officer of»4 ] (he Council to desist. S ? It seems quite evident that the8 1 '* Bumbles of Newcastle are going tc 4 attempt to stifle free speech in thfr 'V same way as has recently been donij'f' in Brisbane and Port Pirie. Thejj'j-'J j will not enforce their MedivaelliVi : Prussianised mandates without con I ^ siderable trouble. The I.W.W. -arfj {] speak in any other part of Australia* ,f without interference by the authori* ties, but in Newcastle,' the centre o one of the greatest working-clas'1 - districts in the Commonwealth' , I liberty of public expression is denied^ '' The I.W.W. is going to have i fight for it. Maitland Gaol will onlv ' hold 150. The free-footed brigadl in al...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"PATRIOTISM." [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 February 1915

'PATRIOTISM.' We have had quite a good deal of snivelling hypocrisy about 'Ger- man Kulture' of late, through the humbug Australian Press. But we hear very little in those enlighten ed columns about the free gifts of tobacco, underclothing, etc., to the ''iitriotic Fund, for which the sol diers in both Rabaul and Samoa have had to pay heavy prices. We presume that some typical 'kultured' English business man is thus coining greenbacks out of pa triotic hysteria.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
More "Unionism." [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 February 1915

More 'Unionism. ' There are two unions of carpenters employed in the State Government dockyards in Melbourne. They hate one another like pojson, even to the extent of scabbing upon each nt.lipr The Amalgamated Society of Car penters which is affiliated with the Australian Trades Hall went on strike recently, and most of their ])laces were filled by the Australian Progressive ( ?) Society of Carpenters affiliated with the Sydney Trades Hall. There is going to b;e a few pro tests, as usual. We understood that the notorious Packer has the head quarters of his infamous free labor ers organisation in Melbourne, from which he supplies scabs to break strikes. In Sydney, however, his organisation with have hard work getting a footing, as the Sydney Trades Hall and its affiliations, do that kind of work. We suggest, however, to the Trades Hall in Sydney that it is de cidedly bad taste to enter Packer's territory as competitors in the strike-breaking business.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
List of Locals in Australia. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 February 1915

List of Locals in Australia. :, — ? * ? ^ ? __ Adelaide Local No. 1 : Secretary Treasurer, S. G. Drummond ;,'' Charles-street, Uniey, Adela'id^ Sydney Local No. 2 : Secretar Treasurer, J. Attreed, 330 Cas tiereagh-street, Sydney, N.S.\y Broken Hill Local No. 3 I'Secreta™' : Treasurer, E. J. Kiely, Pa^ Buildings, Sulphide-street, Br« ken Hill, N.S.W. Port Pirie Local No. 4 : Secretary Treasurer, G. Kiepert, Florence- - street, Port Pirie, S.A. Fremantle Local No.\ 5 : Secretary- ?'? Treasurer, ' N. Giffery, Marv street, Fremantle, AV.A. Boulder City Local No. 6: Secre tary-Treafeurer,- M. Sawteil, r Wittenoom-street, Boulder City W.A. ' Brisbane Local No. 7 : Secretary Treasurer, C. H. Anlezark, 'Mi- mi,' Cribb-street, Milton, Bris bane, Q. Melbourne Local No. 8: Secretary. Treasurer, N. Rancie, 13 W^rd- .. street, South Melbourne, V. N.Z. LOCALS. Auckl-nd Local No. 1: G. Phillips,; Secy. Treasurer, Ki'ifrs Chain- -. hers, Queen St., Auckland. Christ church Local No. 2. ]-]. K«ar. So...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MORE LEGISLATION. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 February 1915

MORE LEGISLATION. Minister Estell is going to recon struct the Arbitration Act, so as to. make strikes legal — which is very kind of our bone-headivl Labour Party, who tried to pet on good terms with the plute, by making strikes illegal. There ain't gaols enough in N.S.W. to accommodate strikers, and enough of Hoggenheim er's millions to maintain them, so the Hard Labour Gang have to climb down. They admit that strikes can't be prevented, 'no more than war can. Startling discovery, ain't it? ?

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 February 1915

SUBSCRIPTION BLANK For DIRECT ACTION. Enclosed find P.O. for 2/, for which send rce Direct Action for 12 months at the fqllowilng address:: — NAME. (Street or P.O. Box) City ? '. ? State ? (If removed, please mark an x here). 'Critic*' in the 'New Zealand Truth' tolH the truth when he saitr, 'The. -workers are kept lean by keep ing 'Fat.' ' He might have added : 'And 'Fat' is obliged to lean on the worker to keep fat.'

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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