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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

mmmmmmmmmmmm -iwmK7sm 'iFMP'Wf1 f8giiryif'-'''Hi' wiviiam-w'1 jwp - iWHJJI wpWP- Mvp ''' '" J' I " l"""1 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 117 Never Give Up. In the world that lies before you There is much for you to win ; But beforehand you must conquer Foes without and foes within. And if now your foes can rout you, Then when life e real battles call, Will you, in their heat and struggle, Victor stand, or vanquished fall? Never say that fate's against you, That you cannot conquer luck ; There is no such thing as either All depends on work and pluck. Only ribc resolved to conquer, Never mind how tough the fray ; Put your hands and brains in motion, And, be sure, you 11 gain the day. Origin of the Word Chicago. The Menominee have a tradition to the effect that some Pottawotamie In dians used to live at the marshes where the city of Chicago is now situated. These Indians reported good hunting, so that when some Menominee went there for game their dogs would bark during the night; but every time t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

'ii'SPmiffSfl M ''J" yyw w"wwvm$'mwp,T-ifi 118 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. P Sf w. Catholics in the Revolution. The Revolution brought out the true .character of Catholics, and whenever "Washington saw them or met them his justice and magnanimity saw over whelming proofs of their loyalty and patriotism. ' He saw the Catholics of Maryland and Pennsylvania joining . heartily and unitedly in the Revolution. Archbishop Carroll, in defending Catholics against unjust aspersions said they were more unanimous on the side of independence than any other religious body in the land and had shed their blood more liberally in pro portion than their fellow citizens of any other creed. Washington, too, saw the Declara tion of Independence signed by Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the Constitution signed by Thomas Fitzsimmons and Daniel Carroll, who were among its founders; he saw John Carroll go to Canada with. Dr. Franklin, Samuel Chase and Charles Carroll of Carrollton to endeaver to remove from Canadian...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 119 that the world now calls for more loudly than ever. It is by these alono that wo can show that we aro worthy of our glorious boon of complete liberty, and it is by these alone that we can turn that ines timable privilego to proper account. "With these we arc everywhere welcome, everywhere useful; without these we are cast aside with contempt, and deservedly ignored, in spite of our momentary, often accidental, worldly prosperity. Parents that shut their eyes to these considerations, arc preparing a danger erous future for their children, because generally speaking, if the children re ceive a defective education, it is the parents, rather than the children, who are in fault. Children are unquestionably selt indulgent, lazy, indifferent, short sighted, trifling and dawdling by nature. But how can we expect them to be any thing else? If they were the contrary, where would be the use of a parent's affection, foresight and worldly wisdom? Ilow can we expect wisdo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

P!!Pfel tw?T 120 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Initiation Ceremonies to the Friendly Society of the Spirit. When the assembly was seated and silence proclaimed, one of the princi pal chiefs arose, and in a short but masterly speech informed his audience of the occasion of their meeting. He acquainted them that one of their young men wished to be admitted into their society, and taking him by the hand presented him to their view, asking them at the same time whether they had any objection to his becoming one of their community. No objection being made, the young candidate was placed in the center and four of the chiefs took their stations close to him. After exhorting him by turns not to faint during the operation he was about to go through, but to behave like an Indian and a man, two of them took hold of his arms and caused him to kneel; another placed himself behind him so as to receive him when he fell, and the last of the four retired to the distance of about twelve feet from him, exactly...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

r " THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 121 stick, and it gives a sound that is far from harmonious, but it just serves to beat time with. To this they some times add the chichicoe, and in their war dances they likewise use a kind of fife, formed of a reed, which makes a shrill, harsh noise. The whole assembly were by this time united, and the clance began. Several singers assisted the music with their voices, and the women joining in the chorus at certain intervals, they produce together a not unploasing but savage harmony. Carler EtK Ann w. EXECUTION OF AN INDIAN. Chokat Ebin, a full-blooded Creek Indian, kneeling before an open grave, divested of war-paint and feathers, and in view of all the members of the tribe, was shot by his father and brother for the murder of Lama Anthony, also a member of the Creek Nation. Two bits of lead, fired with unerring aim at the condemned man's heart, a toppling of the body into its last resting place and justice, according to Creek notions, had been done. The ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

11 n fv, wwmiwmmm?"'M -is'wvi'y'Mi 122 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. L gorged himself with cow meat, and smoked and slept. As the day for his execution came near, Ohokat showed signs 'of fear and unrest. There was a struggle between his love for life, which prompted him to run away, and fear of undying con tempt, disgrace and possible death at the stake if he did. And so when June 4 came, Ohokat was physically ill, and unable to go to the nameless little creek where it was foredoomed that he should die. He sent word to the Governor of the Territory, who reprieved him until the 14th. The fateful day came. Ohokat had by this time nerved himself for the or deal, and had selected his brother and father for the executioners. The three and Chokat's squaw, wailing miserably in treble tones, rode to the place where the young brave was to pay the penalty of his crime. The oldest squaws of the tribe hags they were had scooped out a grave under the branches of a big cotton wood. Around this, in a huge ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

tKVi v.y,V- THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 123 p tanoously, and Chokat, at last a good Indian, pitched forward in to the grave. The father and brother threw back the shell ejector of their rifles, closed the lock, and walked towards their horses. The circle of Indians respect fully parted to give them passage, but father and son spoke to none and none spoke to them. They jumpod into their saddles and slowly cantered away over to their tepees.. No one paid any attention to the squaw. In the oak leaf pinned over Chokat's heart were two little perforations, al most joining. The bullets that made them had gone straight to the murder er's heart. The circle of Indians remained un broken until the father and brother had mounted. Then the other Creeks, scarcely passing a word to one another, dispersed. Many of them had come long distances to see the execution, and now on horseback they galloped away singly, in groups big and little in all directions. Soon they were mere moving specks on the horizon, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

124 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 'Jlje Vrgel of jpurgatory. How many sweet reminiscenes this title recalls to a Christian mind. Purgatory and the Institution of All Souls' Day. BY REV. ODILO J. WITT, O.8.B. "I have lived my life, and that which I have done May He within Himself make pure; but thou, If thou shouldst never see my face again Pray for my soul. More things are wrought by prayers Than this world dreams of. Wherefore, let thy voice Rise like a fountain for me night and day. For what are men better than sheep or goats That nourish a blind life within the brain. If knowing God, they lift not hands of prayer Both for themselves and those who call them friends! For so the whole round earth is every way Bound by gold chains about the feet of God." Could we find words more appropri ate and expressive to introduce our subject than this pathetic strain which Tennyson puts in the mouth of his hero, addressing his surviving comrade, Sir Bedivere ? The great poet, although not a sheep of the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

nBSBBBRnninnivi mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 'e -rrs '""" mmmm-M)'miHiqpy FTT'V1 W """' THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 125 proving that tho practice of praying for tho dead was at that time as preva lent among the Hebrew people as it is with us this day. The New Testament embodies such texts as mako the existence of purga tory a necessary inference. Christ, speaking on the heinousness of the sins committed against tho Holy Ghost, says : " Whosoever shall speak a word against the son of man, it shall be for given him. But he that shall speak against the Holy Ghost, it shall not be forgiven him, neither in this nor in the world to come." Our Savior, de claring that the sins against the Holy Ghost shall not be remitted in the world to come, naturally leaves us to infer that some sins are forgiven be yond the grave. The same truth seems to follow from the words of St. Paul. " Every man's work shall be manifest; for the day of the Lord shall declare it, because it shall be revealed in fire; and the fire ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

IfjPM11 lM " 126 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. eminently reasonable aye a necessity in the existing order of salvation. The infinite sanctity of God involves the absolute necessity that nothing defiled enter the kingdom of heaven. Now we dare say that one or the other of us has perhaps a father or mother, a brother or sister, a relative or friend among the departed, whose life was most exemplary both socially and religiously. But, however bril liant may have been the aureole of their perfections, are we justified in acquitting them of all faults? Now let our opponents choose the alternative. Either our dead friends are in heaven with all their defects and deficiencies, which they cannot harmonize with the infinite sanctity of God, Who abhors even the least shadow of sin, or they are in hell, a- truth which they recoil to acknowledge, and which they cannot reconcile with the infinite mercy and justice of God, Who loves righteous ness and hates injustice. Admit the existence of purgatory and t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

ygWfWKtfw ifjpjp iiiiqiw "fKfVJFWV mnwwujjun'ivAf v THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 127 Rome are no less than six. Of the secular princes whoso unlimited confi dence St. Odilo enjoyed, we mention especially the holy empress Adelaide, whose life he briefly wrote, Otto III., Henry II.; the kings of France, Hugo Capet and his son Robert; king Rudolf III., of Burgundy, duke William of Aquintine; the Spanish kings, Sancho III., Garcia and his brother Ramiro and king Stephen of Hungary. St. Odilo availed himself of this in fluence to further the cause of the Church and of justice and charity, to prevent scandals, to aid the poor and the need)'. Having spent a laborious life in the cause of God and man, he died in the order of sanctity on the 1st of January, 1049. This great man, whose watchword was " I would rath er be judged mercifully on account of mercy, than to be cruelly damned for cruelty," was especially characterized by great mildness and benevolence of heart. Is it then astonishing that he,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

' liWi JF'JjMIJiqp.MPigjijpuNtf!' "h nntiy nj"T -l''""w'iyHlJ" v.' ""'y ! 'fWT"H" "' -s"-v- 'VJf " HJf vw ?" TWVWWT""" 128 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 1- laid down how the commemoration is to be celebrated. Almsgiving, tolling of bells, assisting at and offering the august sacrifice of the Mass and holy communions for the souls of all the faithful departed are its most promi nent features. The motive of this in stitution being the love of God and the happiness of immortal souls, it need not surprise that it hailed from the cloister, for they have ever been the nurseries of sanctity, the furnaces of charity no less than the great focus of all intellectual culture. How holy Mother Church entered upon this idea of charity, first realized by St. Odilo, is evident from the fact that the commemoration of All Souls is universally celebrated throughout her vast domain, and from the privi leges combined with its celebration. Our Holy Father, Pope Leo XIII., has especially encouraged the obser vatio...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

1 The Indian Advocate. Devoted to the Interests of Indian Missions. Vol X. k. Hi I JANUARY, 1898. k BXByI rtJBMHr waft MKiMM,. njJMT 81. MMktBWTHM Kvr I U '( IPjHIHiIbbPSBib; r , r vh H BBBlBflBBWBlBi9vXvD!snKv wbbIbbbb ir2s lk B'fic'2aBBBKSMKBJBBBBB BWJiBBHBKBnrylBHFlBSB'- lil'lvi aS W'" ZSSSBHMJipBP BTflTflTflTflTflTBBBBHVBVflBnK ,hHIbhb&'i iHEKi?. v . yA 4i IjVjFft wPP'SS- T5i- " m RnAu aBr BTflTflYflTflYffjBTi HHB7 jWP" 3HHKr yacbfbbbV jK1M OE& 3 " . wvJPUK? bbbbbbbi&bH HShfllt vr HNb " ' VfHtCw if1" fel5i Cr EBBBKC-fBflafl HfflllfHHIHHp7rHvHHKrjVV1i !fic'i c t!BTflTflTflTBVflnBTflTBTflTflTflTflTflTflTflTflTflTflTflTflTflTflTflTi HHHHHBK HBHESwABIE naMSwnftSrTf' 'wiHIH No. 1,

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. The Early Catholic Missions of California. The church in California has passed through as many phases within the past hundred years as in other coun tries it has required centuries to de velop. With the conquest of Mexico by Cortez the purely military achieve ments of the Spanish monarch ended, and a singular but effective combina tion of military, civil, and religious administration replaced the army. In the light of recent modern his tor', which relates the subjugation of nations and sections through the blood iest contests, sending the victims of national greed into the next world un shriven, it would be manifestly im proper and unjust to urge against the church the important part her priests took in the Spanish conquests. No apology now is necessary on behalf of the church of Christ for perfecting her mission of carrying the "glad tidings" to the uttermost parts of the earth, and availing herself of the favorable oppor tunities afforded by the Spaniards to a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

mmmmmmmmm THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 3 destitute of matorials, could have pos sessed the skill to perform so great and beautiful a work; and a reproach that the practical civilization effected by this learned priest and his co-workers should have been rewarded with con fiscation by the destructive hand of an abortive republic in the name of "God and Liberty." The walls of St. Xavier del Bee are silent as the graves of those who worshipped within them, but the day will come when every stone shall be an accusing witness against the fol lies perpetrated in the name of prog ress. Later, Fathers Guillen, Ugarte, and Consag made further explorations of the Colorado of the West, extending the domain of the missions, and or ganizing now missions with a view of rendering practicable an overland route from Sonora to California. Twenty-eight missions in Arizona should testify to the zeal and energy of these missionaries; but nothing now remains except a few ruins and deserted pueblos, and the tradit...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

wnraanmi THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. productions must bo incalculable. It was to become the seat of an immense population and of a highly civilized and prosperous people; these would form the nucleus of an empire of great power, which would exercise a control ing influence over the whole coast bor dering upon the Pacific Ocean. The- Franciscans, as the successors of the Jesuits, were entrusted with the establishment of a civilization which, when compared with that generally in augurated by civil or military power, was singularly adapted to endure for ages and provide for every contingency that might arise in human affairs. A long line of missions gives evidence of a perfect system of homogeneous pu eblos, frequently differing in rank, but always the same in kind and in organ ization. It was under the laws of Spain that for the first time was built up, codified, and promulgated a complete system of civilized and Christian law (Las Siete Partidas of Alphonso X., in 1260), un der which munici...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

iP!PWippP!iPipp THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Tahle ok tub missions ok Upper California under the Religious Administration in 1834. a SBWpf! Names of Missions going north from the south1. San Diego San Luis Itey San Juan Gapistrano , San Gabriel . San Fernando San Buenaventura Santa Barbara Santa IneB La Purisima Concepcion San Luis Obispo San Miguel San Antonio N. S. de la Soledad Mission del Carmelo San Juan Bautista Santa Cruz Santa Clara San Jo8J Dolores de San Francisco San Rafael San Francisco Solano Twenty-one missions on aline of Juno 1G, 1705). June 13, 1798. Nov. 1, 1770. Sept. 8, 1771. Sept. 8. 1797. Men. 81, 1782. Dec 4. 1780. Sept. 17, 1804. Dec. 8. 1787. Sept. 1, 1771. July 25, 1797. July 14, 1771. Oct. 9. 1791, June 3, 1770. June 24, 1779. Aug. 28, 17 9. Jan. 18, 1777. June 18, 1797. Oct. 9, 1770 Dec. 18, 1817. Aug. 25, 1S2 a a s-i g, . H o 0 a -23 5 S .5 ftM o P w 17 2,500 12,000 14 3,500 80,000 13 1,700 70 000 18 2,70) 105,0' d 9 1,500 14,(110 18 1,100 4,000 12 1,200 5,000 1...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

6 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. the younger of the agricultural works. The regu lations of each mission were the same. The In dians were divided into squads of laborers. At sunrise the bell sounded the Angelus and every one set out for the church. After Mass they breakfasted, and then went to work. At eleven they dined, and this period of repose extended to two o'clock, when they returned to labor until the evening Angelus, one hour before sunset. After prayers and the rosary the Indians had supper, and then amused themselves with dancing and other sports. Their diet consisted of fresh beef and mutton, as much as they chose, wheat and corn cakes, and boiled puddings called atole and pinole. They also had peas, large or small beans in all an 'alraud,' or the twelfth part of a bushel, to each every week. For dress they wore a linen shirt, pantloons, and a woolen blanket; but the over seers and best workmen had habits of cloth like the Spaniards. The women received every year two chemises, a go...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. K many doprodations had been committed upon them by the first governors of the regime of "independence." What is remarkable in the establish ment of the?" missions," says De Mofras, is, "they cost the government nothing." When the missions of Lower California were first founded the vice roys of Spain furnished some assistance. Philip V. gave them in the first years of his reign an annual pension of thir teen thousand dollars, but in the year 1735 the Jesuits added to the capital of their funds by the purchase of produc tive real estate. In 1707 a lady of Guadalajara, Dona Josefa de Miranda, left by will to the college of the Society of Jesus of that city a legacy of more than one hundred thousand dollars, which the Jesuits, however, refused. This was the beginning of what is known as the "Pious Fund" (fondo piadoso) . The property belonging to the "Pious Fund of California," with its successive additions, comprised landed estates, including several mines, manu f...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1898

8 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. intended that the Church should have any property in the missions; that the Spanish government, in engaging the missionaries in this work, intended solely that they should convert and colonize the Indians, and, having ac complished these objects, the system of missions became spent, and the Indians, being now good, pious, and useful, were ready to become citizens. Hence the duty of the state was to come in and relieve the missionaries of their burdens, and the state accomplished this object in an effectual manner. Besides, the idea of the regular clergy holding curacies was wrong, the system of secular curacies being the normal one in the church. This was the theory of secularization. Another reason urged and all governments have a number of "reasons" and excuses for confiscating church property was that the friars, who were mostly Spaniards, were hostile to the newly-acquired "independence" and should be invited to go out of the country, leaving Cali fornia f...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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