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Title: Cayton's Weekly Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 713 items from Cayton's Weekly, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 7 February 1920

Ms a mistaken idea on your par! that, if you <lv not play ball there will be no game. Xo nut 1 is so expert at any game that there is not 11 ill«_>' doing unless he or she lakes part Keep in mind that if you die today your place will be Riled tomorrow and you will lie forgotten the third day. 'There seems to be little or no doubt but that every colored voter in the city will give l>ob Ilesketh a vole and all because he Records the colored man the same con sideration as the white man. In other words, all men look alike to Bob, especially in his official capacity. As difflculi as ii may seem to be to sleep in ;i berth of a sleeping car enruote, yet the passengers on an X. P. from Portland, the oilier night, slept so soundly that they lost the most of their valuables. That's a splen did "ad" Tor Hie X. I\ and it should reim burse all of those who lost. We have decided to employ Tom Mur phine, if he leaves Hie employ of the city, if ii be a fact I hat he can juggle figures so a...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 7 February 1920

THE PASSING THRONG The one-day session of the grand lodge of the Masons of Washington and juris diction was hold last Tuesday and was attended by J. C. Logan, Edward Ruther ford and Mac Oliver, Portland; Henry J. Asbeny, J. A. Nelson, Clarence Rounds and J. Lumpkins, Taeoma; J. E. Shepperson and \V. J. Morrison, Roslyn; John Golden and Rev. J. A. Duncan, Ellensburg; A. J. Bragg and W. L. Perkins, Yakunaj R. E. Crump, Spokane; Thomas Jefferson, Newton Solomon, M. E. Bird, E. 11. Williams and J. E. Morton, Everett; J. B. White and William Ellis, Bellingham; Edie Gardner and Howard Brown of Seattle. The ses sion was presided over by E. 11. Holmes, grand master. At the conclusion of the session of the grand lodge a banquet was served in honor of the recently made lodge of Seattle. * * * "Why, there is Henry Gregg," said a friend to me as we were walking down the street, and I involuntarily said, "come here Don," and gave a distress whistle for my dog. Of course my Don is dead and I am d...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 7 February 1920

PURELY PERSONAL Mi. Russell Smith lias been seriously ill with the lin the past wek, but is improving. Mr. Henry .1. Asberry, a Taeoma pioneer, was among those visiting the city this week. Mr. flames K. Shepperson, after a two weeks stay in the city, has returned to his home in Koslyn. Mr. ('. A. Davis of Everett was in the city the past week and enjoyed the hospi talities of friends. Mrs. \V. 11. Wilson was relieved of her spare change last Sunday evening by a brace of hold-ups. Key. J. A. Nelson of Tacoma was among those who attended the one-day session of the grand lodge of Masons last Tuesday. Mr. John T. Gayton will have charge of the cloak room at the Lincoln Day banquet given by the Young Men's Republican Club. Comfort able rooms to rent. Two ear lines near. 1634 Nineteenth Avenue. Phone Rainier 274-W. Miss Madge R. Cayton, a university stu dent, is suffering of a slight attack of in flammatory rheumatism. Mr. Thomas Jefferson, grand secretary of the Masonic Grand Lodge of th...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 14 February 1920

@agtfch& PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. Subscription $2 per year in advance. HORACE ROSCOE CATTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1918, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 3579 Office 317 22nd Aye. South RE-ELECT FITZGERALD There is no doubt as to where Mayor Fitzgerald stands on the municipal owner ship of the street railway system and its his ambition to make of it a gigantic suc cess. If he is re-elected he will continue to keep men at the head of the system, who will be just as enthusiastic of its success as is the mayor. Mayor Fitzgerald favors the municipal ownership of public utilities and has proven his worth along those lines, the years he has served the city as council man and mayor. The voters know exactly where he stands on the subject and are tak ing no chances in voting for his re-election. Speaking further concerning th...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 14 February 1920

WHAT'S UP YOUR SLEEVE? For nearly a century organized labor in the United States has combatted every ef fort of the colored man to break into, not only the skilled labor of the country, but yea verily even into the ordinary labor, save thai of the cotton fields of the South, Iml when it found the colored man was successfully filling the strikers' places then the whole craft took alarm and began to devise ways and means to pacify the al ready outraged black man, and many amends have been recently made to heal over the breaches of the past. We are not rejecting these overtures and know''it's bet ter late than never,"but we are timid about accepting the right hand of fellowship from life long enemies, suddenly converted to the teachings of, "all men are born equal." A few days ago we (Hit from the Union Record of Setatle the excerpt below, and while we hate to impugn the motives of any man, yet coming at this particular time we read the article with a grain of salt. However we are very...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 14 February 1920

THE PASSING THRONG. While Seattle has a great many more or less important female personages, yet, to my mind, none of them have reached that pin aele of importance as did Mrs. Frank Me- Dermott, who passed to the great beyond last Saturday. I have often heard it said of men, who attained great prominence in the affairs of the country, in which they lived, "he was a man among men," but of Mrs. McDermott it can be truly said, she was a woman, not only among women, but a woman among men. In the business world she reach ed the zenith, not by leaps and bounds, but step by step. When I first came to Seattle, some thirty years ago, Mrs. McDermott, who was then Mrs. Nordhoff, in conjunction with her husband .was operating a baby Bon Marche in Belltown, a Seattle suburb, and they always had Saturday sales, and multipli ed hundreds of persons with limited means would walk miles to get to those sales, and I followed the crowd. I would stand and watch Mrs. Nordhoff serve her customers, and I sa...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 14 February 1920
Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 21 February 1920

&i///eii'±Jzeed^ PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. Subscription $2 per year In advance. HORACE ROSCOB CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, ""Vash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 3579 Office 317 22nd Aye. South CALDWELL WINS NOMINATION. Tnspite of the fact the daily press of the city,with the exceptions of the Union Rec ord, was a unit for Fitzgerald, yet in a three cornered race he came out a poor third. Evidently the voters made up their, minds that they would not stand for news paper dictatorship and therefore rebuked at the pools the candidates they advocated. Such a thing in other cities has happened before and now it has happened here. The street railway deal was also an ele ment in the nomination fight that militated against Fitzgerald and helped Caldwell. It is the belief among many of the voters that the purchase of the st...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 21 February 1920

HAVE TO KEEP IT UP. Under the <\-i|>ti<>n of Inconsistency ap peared hii article in a Chicago weekly pap* er complaining of the same tiling that Cay ton's Weekly lias complained of from time to time, the treatment accorded to the col ored 111,111 by ilic reporters of the daily press. The editor hereof not Long since was moved to appeal to the management of a daily paper of Iliis city to have the report ers of said daily paper modify their news stories about the colored person of whom they Ikhl to write. Our complaint lie in the Tact that, in a three inch article telling about a criminal Negro, the Negro designa tion was used just thirteen times. Now this Chicago publication is writing along the same line and here is what it says: "Readers of newspapers are never at a loss to know what the nationality of a criminal mighi be—if he chances to be a member of our group. It will say "Bill Williams. Xeuro." or "Sam Jackson, Color er," etc. It hits no doubt been a great source o...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 21 February 1920

THE PASSING THRONG. At the Asberry Methodist Church of this city, for the past month, the subject of Race Relationship, lias been under discus sion among 1 the membership and a few days ago, Lorenza Graham, son of Rev. W, A. Graham, appeared before the society of the church that lias been studying the above question, and talked concerning the re lationship of the white and colored folks of this country. Mr. Graham is a graduate of the Broadway High and is quite studious in his habits, yet he has been unable to get employment, such as the white members of his class have secured and all because he is a colored man. Time and time again he has answered advertisements for compe tent help only to be abruptly turned down and that too without a moments considera tion when he put in his appearance. Mr. Graham's experience however, is no differ ent from trie experience of ' nil educated colored men and women. The question is, Does the public demand such a demarca tion, so far as the colored m...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 21 February 1920

STOLEN FROM THIEVES. I'at Murphy: "Brigit, I've got a job.'' Bridgei Murphy (who is very tired of supporting the family: "(Jlory be!" Pat Murphy: "1 shall want a new suit, an' ye can pawn me nightshirts to get it." Bridgei Murphy. "Your nightshirts!" I'at Murphy: "Sure, an* for what should I be wanting them when I've got a job as nielli watchman and can only sleep in the daytime f" Hubby: "The only way I can avoid these payments is to put everything 1 own in your name. There's one thing certain, if I don't own anything they can't collect from me." Wifey: "Oh. won't it be just lovely for me to have all that money to spend!'' Miss I'la in: "Mamma says I'm too young to marry." Miss Pert: "Oh, well, she needn't worry about you, you'll not he too young by the time you Mud a man to propose to you." While in London on a holiday, visitor was to have a look at the Thames. There was a steam shovel at work out in the river and he was standing and watching it. Sud denly lie felt a tap on his sh...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 28 February 1920

€cufZoh& JzeeMg PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. Subscription $2 per year in advance. HORACE ROSCOB CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 3579 Office 317 22nd Aye. South CONSIDER THYSELF There is no doubt but that the colored citizens of this country suffer a great deal from what may he termed the sins of com mission on tiie part of the white citizens, hut it is an undeniable fact that many of their troubles are due to their own sins of omission. For an example, whatever is is, so far as they are concerned, and they ac cept such poods as the pods provide and complain if a sufficiency is not provided In other words, unless some one gives them jobs they wont have jobs. To illustrate, it is variously estimated that there are up wards of 5.000 colored persons in Seattle. It is also variously estima...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 28 February 1920

Getting an education without an objec tive |x int in life amounts to one and the same thing as flying off on a tangent through space, yet hoping to land some where As tlic daily newspaper reporter hears it, .in educated colored person talks plantation jargon jusi as perfectly as the cottonfield Negro, who docs not know B from bull's foot. Eighi dollars, good and true, is exactly what is due, Tor my work each day, rubbing your iiilliien/a hay. I'm a full-fledged black cross nurse, but have an empty red cross purse, and you this pocketbook must Mil. or you bet your life, you «?et no pill. Rost'oe Simmons has been elcted president of the Lincoln League, which is now a .Re publican adjunct. I. F. Norris, the erst while Seattle Democrat, is one of the faith ful. Wilberforce University, which began its existence February 24th will celebrate founder's day with a great gathering and the raising of $")(>,()()() for the benefit of the school. Plying from Seattle to San Diego in twelve hour...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 28 February 1920

THE PASSING THRONG "Are you catering to the colored vote?' inquired a white man at one of Candidate Caldwell'a recant metings, to which, it is said, he retorted, "you bet I am not. My grandfather had more Negro slaves than there are Negro voters in Seattle and I know exactly how to handle those fellows." If Hugh M. Caldwell actually used such lan guage then ho is by no means the dignified gentleman that I had given him credit of being-, yea, if true. I am of the opinion that he is a veritable damphool The own ing- of human slaves on the part of his or any other person's grandfather is nothing to boast of and had his grandfather re ceived his just deserts he would have been hanged for his human brutality and if Hugh Caldwell has any of the blood of his grand father then his political life should be crushed out by the silent vote of the grand sons and daughters of the men, who shot the hell out of the red-handed, slave-holding murderers of the South I trust, however, that Major Caldwe...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 28 February 1920

tional authorities of the country to the effect that no man can be Americanized by educa tion, and thai if you try to do so you will make him more dangerous than he was be fore. Take, for example, theh Russians that come 1o this country. "Very many of them hate any government. To them, government is obnoxious. The more you teach them the more dangerous they become. You will not Americanize them —you will make them dan gerous enemies of all governments. The mere fact that a man is taught to read, write, and understand English will not American ize him. . . . Anarchists who come to this country do not become Americanized— they remain anarchists, and present exper ience is demonstrating that fact. Educate them and they become just so much the more dangerous." Senator Frelinghuysen ventured to say that ewery man deported in the "red ark" was a man of education. He might have said, and with equal truth, that there were very few senators who have the education of Kimna Goldman and perhaps...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 6 March 1920

€agf£ph& wee&g PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTONS WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. Subscription $2 per year in advance. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 3579 Office 317 22nd Aye. South LEGISLATURE'S EXTRA SESSION In order to save the University of Wash ington from apparent bankruptcy Governor Hart lias called a Bpecial session of the legis lature to provide it with necessary funds to prevent either an alarming deficit or the actual closing down of the school Under the direction of President Oozaoola this in stitution has been systematically worked Up to a rich man's proposition and the poor man's child no longer has a look in out there, where the state's money is lavished on luxuries to such an extent that the whole thing has become a gauling tax on the people and. aparently, without just com pensation. The...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 6 March 1920

SCANNING THE HORIZON The Suhilkiii l>ji|>tisi Convention (col* ored) has reached the conclusion to round ;i National Seminary ai Nashville, Term. Kven before, Nashville so far :is the colored citizens ;!!■(■ concerned, was the Athena of the Pnited States, ;m<l this new institution of learning 1 »i ll ads another evidence of the fact. War Clayton, La., a .jim crow car went into tho fixer ;iiml twenty of its occupants wore drowned. The .jim crow car was annul of flic baggage car, which piled in (Hi the jim crow ear when it went off the briiL'v into the river, ihus preventing any of its uciipiinis from escaping a watery grave, Owing to inditVerent treatment accorded in colored pat ions in the haberdarseries con ducted by white n, l». T. Cater of Birm ingham, Ala , has organized the Pioneer Mercantile Company and is now opening up ,-i chain of haberdashery stores in Georgia and Alabama, which it is hoped will move other colored persons to do likewise in ni her places. '•Sunny" ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 6 March 1920

THE PASSING THRONG It was some ten years ago, if I make no mistake, when I was running a paper known as The Republican, that Tillman Smith, one of the Newcastle colored mine workers, left the mines owing me $2.00 for my paper. Years came and went and so far as I knew Tillman Smith no longer lived, but the other day he hailed me on the street and as soon as he had greeted me he said, "I owe you two dollars and I am going to pay you and in addition I am going to give you an extra dollar for interest." That it was the veritable "clap of thunder from a clear sky." 1 would have sworn, but I thanked the long lost man and said to him, "yon are one of the few, if any such." I felt good all day from the effects of meeting the lost man, but when I got home that night I found two letters awaiting my arrival, both from preach ers, who had been receiving the paper for three years or more and each of them re fused to pay, and. furthermore "stop the paper." While Tillman Smith had never been put d...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 6 March 1920

THE LINCOLN LEAGUE CONVENTION Our city was hanored during the past week in having l»een selected as the place in which the lirst national convention of the Lincoln League was held. This league is a charired organization composed exclusively of Colored Americans. Koscoe Conkling Simmons is the president, but the silent genius who is primarily responsible for the organization and formation of this splendid organization is Robert R. Church of Mem phis. Term. These gentlemen have associated themselves with a number of the most prom inent and influential members of our group in every section of the country. The purpose of the organization is to arouse ;i proper sentiment in the country that will result in a removal of the griev ances lo which we are subjected and of which we have just cause to complain; chief among them being lynch law, Jim Crowism and disfraiichiseiiieiit through an evasion or vio lations of the 15th amendment to the con stitution. Thai much good will be accom plished a...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 13 March 1920

&H//cu'i PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. Subscription $2 per year in advance. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 3579 Office 317 22nd Aye. South THE PASSING THRONG At the funeral of Thomas E. Wilson, 1 was much impressed with what the officiat ing clergyman had to say about him while alive and in the performance of his daily duties, among which was the words of the manager of the concern, which, for the past nine years had employed Mr. Wilson as night watchman and shipping clerk, ''A more trustworthy and reliable man could no where be found. We turned over our entire plant after closing hour to the care and custody of Mr. Wilson and felt abso lutely satisfied that the whole would be watched over with as much care and consid eration as if we ourselves were there. It just seems ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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