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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1985

JANUARY, 1985 Monthly Journal of Mountain Life GONE ARE THE DAYS My greatest fear is that scientists will develop some drug or machine that will erase memory. As we grow older this vast mine of the past serves us as a refuge from the bewildering changes. I was fortunate enough to have a happy carefree childhood. We made our own amusements and were taught to love the out-doors. On my sleepless nights now, I soothe my shattered nerves by journeys back to my play-houses, always in calling distance of home. I always love to travel back through the Time Zone to the bright, hot morning "Uncle Steven" entered out lives. I was busy sweeping the dirt floors, re-arranging the moss beds and straightening out the long sticks that* divided the rooms. My brother Charles was busily destroying a huge stump with a hatchet (stolen from Papa's smoke house). Birds flew by, looked curiously but undisturbed. They were accustomed to us. A tame little chipmunk ran behind the huge oil drum that was our pian...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1985

PAGE 2 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1985 GONE ARE THE DAYS Continued from page 1. were always dressed in matching clothes. Sailor dresses and Sailor suits were in vogue then. We had white outfits and blue outfits. I had black patent leather slippers, while the pride of his life was his "Buster Brown" shoes. Every Saturday night these shoes were shined by rubbing a biscuit over them. We were scrubbed from head to toe over our vigorous protests. My long hair was plaited and the next morning unplaited, brushed and adorned with huge ribbon bows. We were very proud as we marched to the front of the church. I would swish my long hair hanging below my waist, to make certain everyone noticed. One night as we left Uncle Steven's house, after about five angry calls from Mama, Charles asked, "What we gonna sing tomorrow?" "I don't know. It's your turn to announce it." "I'm sick to death of 'Jesus Loves Me' and Bring Them In'." "I spect God is too." I replied . "Can you think of anything different?...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1985

John F. Kennedy once wrote an interesting and best-selling book called "Profiles In Courage". Unfortunately it was limited to political figures and space would not allow it to profile any of the everyday heros who really keep the ecomony and moral strength of our nation moving. If such a book is ever written, it should certainly contain a page or two about Myrtle Stanley Harrell Reynolds, a Willis, Virginia widow who recently celebrated her BOth birthday and refuses to "move in" with any of her sons and daughters. Myrtle was reared near Mayberry and says that she learned early that there were few free lunches along the way and that it is a "root pig or die" philosophy that gets a body through. Her life began, probably, on a happier note and when she was a dancing teenager and considered one of the best flat-foot dancers in the Heart of the Blue Ridge. Revellers in the Bell Spur, Banks Town, Mayberry triad would stop their circling to watch her fancy foot work as they celebrated wedd...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1985

PAGE 4 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1985 THE THIRD DAY By: Gerry Y. Scardo If' you get five stories just exactly like this, don't be surprised, for five of us heard exactly the same thing at the same time. Some of my sisters, a niece and I were upstairs in the old frame house sitting on the bed and talking. "Mama" (Mary Lee Yeatts) who had been crippled for several years and on crutches, suddenly passed away and the burial had been that day. We all missed her presence in the home so. All the other company, friends, and relatives had made their way home hours ago, so the four rooms below were totally deserted except possibly for Dad, who was resting. Then suddenly, we all heard it! The exact sound below was of Mama walking through the kitchen on her crutches - First the sound of the crutch striking the floor, then the creak of the crutch as the weight of the body was transfered onto it, the shuffling sounds of her feet half dragging on the floor. We wouldn't believe it! Even we, as youth...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1985

GHOST STORIES 'Continued from page 4. When a searching party came too near the spot he slipped back at night; took the body and carried it on his back to this very swamp, leaving the head behind. .Now, Father Dalton certainly didn't want anyone to interrupt his search for the precious herb so he quickened his pace. It was still there. He slowed down - so did the presence. He could now feel it breathing down his shirt collar. He strained his eyes in the darkness but could see nothing. Presently a light began to glow. As •it waxed brighter it began to take the form of the headless grandfather. Beads of perspiration stood out on the father's brow as the apparition began to beckon to hiin. He wiped his blurred eyes and glanced again - it was still there, beckoning as if it expected to be obeyed. Father's feet became very light and little prickles played tag up and down his spine. His mind raced quickly back to the bedside of his favorite child, lying so white on the pillow, with the fee...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1985

PAGE 6 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1985 POSSUM NIGHT AT WOLFPEN CREEK I am by nature, very tolerant and open-minded about food. I have very few taboos. While in the foreign service, I ate raw fish in Japan, broiled iguana in Panama and sea urchin pie in Chile. I have this gut feeling that the possibility of world famine and ensuing anarchy is very real for the future. If this means eating grubs, crickets and scorpions, thus, shall the table be prepared. Yet, even this obsession for survival wavered when my friend, Woodrow Horseman, approached me about cooking for the possum social at Wolfpen Creek. Woodrow and I are considered pretty fair campfire chefs. Our services are in demand on a regular basis, and we have presided over about every type of outing from fish fries to Kentucky burgoo suppers. Possums on the other hand were something entirely different from anything I had tackled previously. Woodrow assured me that possum cookery was not a difficult art to master. Although roast poss...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1985

POSSUM NIGHT Continued from page 6. Here is the recipe for Woodrow's Special Possum Stuffing. (1 possum) 1 large onion, chopped fine. Possum liver (optional). 1 cup bread crumbs. 1 pod red pepper, chopped. Dash Worcestershire sauce. 1 hard boiled egg, chopped fine. Salt to taste. Brown onion in fat. Add finelychopped liver and fry until liver is tender. Add crumbs, red pepper, Worcestershire sauce, egg, salt and water to moisten. Mix until ingredients are blended. Stuff possum with possum stuffing. Stomach cavity of possum should be closed using string or skewers. Roast in moderate oven -(350 degrees F) about V/ 2 hours or until possum is tender and brown. Serves 10. The kitchen was well-ordered with plenty of oven and range space. By mid-afternoon, the possums were roasting and sputtering in the oven while Woodrow and I took turns basting them with a mixture of cooking sherry and possum fat. As they browned in the pans, they looked more and more like succulent roasting piglets. By ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1985

PAGE 8 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1985 John Hayes Hollow I know now that my family was' extremely poor when we children were small* But I didn't know that then. I don't remember ever being hungry, but I recall a few mornings when we had only cornbread, molasses and fat back gravy for breakfast. We kids sure put up a fuss when we went to the breakfast table and there was no biscuits and ham, sausage or cream gravy. I think back now at how bad it must have made our parents feel to have to serve us only cornbread and a little fat back gravy. But not once did I* ever hear them complain. They taught us to be thankful for what ever we had. No matter how slim the pickings, my dad never even considered going on welfare. He thought welfare was for those who were not able to work and had no income of any kind. I remember one time some man from town came and said they had been all over the county trying to find someone who would go into all the homes of those who were getting welfare checks and ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1985

Are Vultures and Buzzards the same? What Good are Vultures? If you looked up "Buzzard" in the dictionary, these are some definitions you would get: "1. Any of various hawks that are slow and heavy in flight. 2. Same as Turkey Buzzard." Then look up the word "Vulture" and these are what you would find: "1. A large bird related to the eagles and hawks. 2. Same as TURKEY BUZZARD'.' Those are from Webster's New World Dictionary. So if we went by that and by what we hear people in certain areas call them, you might conclude that a buzzard and a vulture are one and the same. Not so! The #l's are correct, but not #2' s. If we 'go to an authority on birds, "The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Birds" we find this statement: "Vultures are often called buzzards, a Western misnomer (meaning misnamed) originally applied to Buteo Hawks in the Old World." Some Buteos or Buzzard hawks we have in this country include the Red-tailed Hawks, the RedShouldered Hawk, and the BroadWinged Haw...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1985

PAGE 10 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1985 FIRE ON THE MOUNTAIN In the 1950's in Galax I was my Granddaddy Troy Goodson's driver, before Goodson's Cafe burnt down in 1961, when I was already working in Cleveland. There were several reasons why Troy Goodson needed a driver for the Dodge automobiles he bought over the years from Cochran's garage. He had learned to drive fairly late in life and always looked down to see where his brake pedal was before he stomped his foot on it. This wasn't the safest maneuver I ever saw. Also, he invariably pulled out to the middle of the road before making a right turn. The only explanation for this operation I could ever come ,up with was that Troy drove like he was still up on the mountain with his team and wagon, and was just making sure he got his load of hay around that right hand corner. There were, inevitably, minor mishaps, most notably when the car rammed backwards into a ditch, because Granddaddy forgot to put on the handbrake while visiting rel...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1985

FIRE ON THE MOUNTAIN Continued from page 10. was a-blowin' up the world, and that lightenin' kept on a-flash-in' and a-cracklin' like that, till I thought for sure hit was tryin' to kill me, kill ever one of us! "But the rain finally come and hit was jist like the Flood startin' all over again. We thought hit was the end of the world! "We got the far put out in the rye shocks, finally, and kept hit from takin' holt among the trees. Then the rain come down and put the rest of hit out, and when we got back down to the meader he was dead! He died while QUALITY LOG HOMES AT AFFORDABLE PRICES """^ e Beautiful, Natural Way To Live - ' x THE SHAWNEE IMPROVED "THE BLUE RIDGE" # Ridge Beam and Snow Blocks SA , _- AA „ _ . _ f=q • Hardboard Splines 30 xSO 1500 SQ.FT. r"1 Uk-CL U _ • Gasketing OPTIONS: bedroom S'ffffjj r°°" * Ten Inch Spikes • Log Gable Ends ° ' AJJ __ . Blueprints • Log Rafters For Main Building 30 |i t=t "Iv 3 • Four Hours of Building And Porch (See Lafayette Model) j i= Sup...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1985

PAGE 12 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1985 The Mail Box Dear Editors: On a recent trip to Meadows of Dan, we ran into a truly unique individual in one Mr. Tommy Cockram. After meeting at a small fruit stand,. Mr. Cockram spent the day with us, total strangers, and took us on a complete tour of the area. We walked the reservoir, took in the view at "Lover's Leap", and got caught up in the discussion at the [Mayberry] Trading Post. Meeting Tommy was indeed the highlight of our trip. He also introduced us to The Mountain Laurel for which a subscription is enclosed. Your area is fortunate to have such a distinct character as Tommy Cockram. C. Simpson/L. Barnett Baltimore, Md. Hello, We're living on a mountaintop pretty far from home. I guess receiving your Mountain Laurel each month would be pretty good medicine for home sickness. We look forward to returning soon to God's country. Thank you lyJ. Eisner Smithers, British Columbia Canada Dear Mountain Laurel, This is a cold rainy evening here...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1985

Genealogy Dear Editor, A friend of mine gave me the July copy of your paper. He knew I was a Hawks before my marriage and wanted me to read the story about Floyd Hawks. In the story it stated that he lived across the road from the Puckett Cabin. I am a grand-niece of Mrs. Orlene Hawks Puckett and just wondered if he was not a relative of Mrs. Puckett and in turn making him related to me. It is very strange that I would see the story just now when I have a book coming from the press in about two weeks about my early life and my father's people and my mother's people - the Hawks and the Hudsons. My grandchildren have no comprehension of what life 65 years ago was like. I spent a year collecting stories, facts, arts and craft ideas and material on just how they survived. Had I have known about Floyd Hawks, I feel I could have added a few more chapters to the book. Subscribe Today To The Mountain Laurel A Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life 1 Year (12 Issues) Only $ 6.00 Send A Gift! or 2 ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1985

PAGE 14 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1985 THE GUEST OF HONOR A. Story COPYRIGHT © 1984 By: Wm. Axley Allen "Well now, it's quite an honor for me to be asked to speak to you all here today on the annivsary of the battle that was fought here between the blue and the gray. I suppose the greatest honor bestowed upon me though, was the good Lord seeing fit to keep me around long enough to make me the last known living survivor of the hell that took place on this ground 70 years ago today." "The committee in charge of these here activities told me I was to be the guest of honor today, but I told 'em I'd settle for the right to tell you folks of the honor I saw here 70 years ago. It was a bad time when family was killing family amid the smoke and roar of cannon barrel loads of grape shot. It was a confusing time when boys were scattered over these fields moaning and dying while they watched their brothers die and prayed for death themselves. There were deeds of daring and courage performed her...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1985

Mayberry Trading Post Meadows of Dan, Virginia Milepost 180-181 on the Blue Ridge Parkway HOMEMADE MOUNTAIN CRAFTS Mayberry Trading Post was built in 1892. It originally housed the Mayberry Post Office as well as a general store. Today you can still see the old mail bins in the back as well as the original counter tops put in place in 1892. The Trading Post is operated by 83 year old Miss Addie Wood, a lifelong resident of Mayberry. Come on by for a visit. There's a stove where you will find folks gathered for conversation and socializing and the essence of an era gone by remains nestled in the old wooden floors and in the smile on Miss Addie's face. It's a real old fashion mountain general store! OPEN YBAR ROUND - WINTER HOURS - JANUARY THRU APRIL: WEEKDAYS - 8:00-5:00, SUNDAY - 1:00-5:00 t PHONE: 703-952-2155 MAIL ORDER GOODIES - OLD FASHION MOLASSES $6.00 QUART, $3.15 PINT. rIS OLD FASHION APPLE BUTTER $4.00 QUART/ $2.25 PINT L3SJ MAPS: MAYBERRY CIRCA 1915 - $6.00 OLD FASHION BON...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1985

PAGE 16 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1985 ELIZABETH'S JOURNAL The following is an excerpt from a journal kept by Elizabeth Cooley McClure of Carroll County, Virginia from 1842 (she was 17 then) until her death in 1 s4s. Her journal not only reflects the day to day world she and her family lived in, but a young girl's hopes and expectations for the future. A special thanks to the Cooley family for sharing it with us. Jan, Ist, 1845. Today we worked on Jesse's over coat and Mother made James a shirt. He is gone to Reed Island to J.W. McClure's school and I am glad. Pleasant Taylor N hauled wood here today. Jincy [slave] helped him. One of Julian's eyes is very sore so she had to go to bed at an early hour No person was here today but Jerry Ward. It is past nine.. All gone to bed but Amanda and myself and Jincy is sewing around her bed quilt. Last night after we went to bed, Amanda & Ika in the boy's bed, Julian and myself in our bed, indulged our wild and unruly imaginations f...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1985

TOBAX REVISITED Very few people alive today have ever visited Tobax, Virginia and known it. Yet thousands pass it by each year as they travel the Blue Ridge Parkway between Mayberry and Meadows of Dan, Virginia. Approximately 100 yards north of Parkway milepost 179, one can look east across the chestnut split rail fence to the hollow below and see the old community of Tobax. The quaint mountain post office established in 1872 and named, legend has it, by combining the words tobacco and ax was phased out in 1907- The building was demolished about 1932. But what you will find today between state road 614 and the Blue Ridge Parkway near Meadows of Dan, Virginia, standing near the site of the old Tobax Post Office, is a solar and hot water heated building that combines the modern with antiquity. It was intended for use as a "back to basics" carpentry shop. Susan Elizabeth Shelor had planned to hand craft quality pine coffins for discriminating people who are tired of the plastic world a...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1985

PAGE 18 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1985 "MUSH" © COPYRIGHT 1984 How many of you have eaten a big bowl of mush on a cold winter's night? The dictionary defines mush as "Cornmeal boiled in water or milk". It has a much larger definition according to the older generation. Many times mush was used to fill in when there wasn't much else in the line of food. I am old enough to remember eating mush as a child. It was delicious, and I still love it. People in the mountains still make mush. I heard a girl at work say one day recently, "I sure would love to have a good pot of mush. " My Dad could make the best ever. This is the way I remember Dad making mush. Bring some water to boiling and add salt to taste. I can see my dad now, letting the cornmeal sift slowly from his hand, a little at a. time, stirring vigorously all the while. The secret to good mush is adding the meal slowly and stirring right. Mom Gracie always let Dad make the mush at our house because hers always turned out "doughy". ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1985

A "SHOCKING " EPISODE A body might think that nothing funny could ever happen in a hayfield, but* something did. There are people in our family that, wherever they are, there's goin' to be somethin' goin' on to stir up a good laugh. That's what they think they were put here for! I'm thinkin' about something that happened in the old days, about sixty years ago. All the modern improvements we had on our farm then were a horse-drawn mower and hayrake. The hay was shocked by hand and pitchfork, carried up by two people on haypoles (the hay, I mean) and pitched up to form a stack by somebody who had a good, stout arm. Another unlucky worker pulled the hay into the pole, tramped it down, and got hayseeds down his neck! That day we had several hands in the field. There were Annie and Dora, my sisters, makin' the shocks where the hay had been rolled up by the rake. My oldest sister, Mollie, and an old fellow we had hired to help, Jed Pratt, were carryin' the shocks up to the haystack. My co...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1985

PAGE 20 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1985 BACKROADS Continued from page 24 Emily Winters Moore August 18, 1864 - June 28, 1953 (Mother of Mattie Jane Moore Martin) Her gravestone inscription reads, u Tc live in hearts we leave behind is not to die". 00.0 From the intersection of Virginia Route 8 and the Blue Ridge Parkway (Parkway milepost 165.2), we will head north on the Parkway toward Roanoke, Virginia. 01.7 As we travel north on the Parkway, watch for the left shoulder of the road for the concrete milepost markers. After passing milepost 164, we will turn right onto state road 709 which will then curve to the left and parallel the Parkway. 02.1 The turn of the century Thomas Grove Primitive Baptist Church is on our left here. 02.2 At this stop sign, we will bear to our right continuing on state road 709- 02.9 If we look to our left here we are provided with a beautiful view of the old Rakes Mill Pond and the Parkway. 03 • 8 The mountain with the firetower on top of it to our right i...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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