ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Pacific Rural Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
252,578 results
HELPFUL EDA. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

HELPFUL EDA. A Lesson for Children. Eda was our city cousin. We had never seen her, but Sarah Ann Carson, who, bocause she is acquainted with us, concluded to call on her when she was in New York, said she was a "mighty stuck up little body." Mother says that it is not a pretty way to speak of any one, but poor Sarah Ann has no mother to teach her, and some folks seem to think that anybody who lives in a handsome house and wears clothes must of course be vain and proud. Yet, if the truth must be owned, we girls were not at all averse to accepting Sarah Ann's opinion. "I know I shan't like her," said Frank, shrugging her shoulder, "she'll be so prim and precise that we shan't dare to turn round. It's always so with those city girls. For my part I wish she wasn't coining." "I wish so, too," echoed Elle, "we shan't have one bit of fun as long as she stays." lint wishing was useless. Uncle Elliot had written that Eda was not well and neededa change of air, and of course father wrote to ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
FOR LADIES WHO CAN AFFORD IT. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

FOR LADIES WHO CAN AFFORD IT. Heavy crimped twist-fringe is pretty for cashmere. Cloth cloaks are worn longer than the saeques and paletots of last winter. Scotch wraps are also very popular, worn in various picturesque styles, as for several seasons past. Waterproof cloaks are in great demand, and ara indispensible to a lady's comfort. Turbans, trimmed with fur, are worn for skating hats. Veils are almost indispensible for either veils or hats. Long over garments have superseded the absurd, little jackets, which were without dignity or sutU-ieut warmth for winter. Aukaham had a number of servants in his employment, and what do you suppose he" called' them? Why he called them souls -souls he had gotten in Aram. Now the gentlemen in Liverpool and Manchester, what do they call their work people? Hands, that's all. "When a stranger treats me with want of proper respect," said a philosophio pooiman," I comfort myself with the reflection that it is not myself he slights, but my old shabb...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Premium Sewing Machine. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

Premium Sewing Machine. Ono of the kind that a man can love, That wears a shawl and a soft kid glove; Has the merriest eye ami the daintiest foot, And sports the c'harmingest gaiter boot; And n bonnet with feathers, ribbons and loops, And an inderiuato number of hoops. One that can dance and possibly— flirt, And make a pudding us well as n shirt, One that can shit,' without dropping fi stitch, And play the housewife, lady or witch, Ready to give us the Bageat advice, And do up our collars and things so nioe. We like the sort that can laugh and talk, And take our arm for an evening's walk; That we do whatever the owner may choose, With the slightest peroeptible turn of the screws; "Pis the cleverest thing that was ever seen, Our wonderful family sewing machine.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
UP COUNTRY LETTERS.—NO. 3. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

UP COUNTRY LETTERS.—NO. 3. [Written for the Puksh.] Dbab Beadsb: —I eannotrefrain from giving you a peep into my new form life, and telling you of its inmates. In the family there are two girls, so different, that each is a study; I amuse myself daily in reading to them, and their lives ieem to go out in such opposite ways, that I find myself wondering how it ever happened, with the same surroundings. Amelia, tho eldest, gay and brilliant, full of life and dash, but so selfish, she seems of different blood from blue eyed Nell—gentle, quiet Noll—unselfish, to a fault. If there is any unpleasant duty to be done. Nell is sure to see it first and do it. It is her nimble ringers that keep the lamps and candlesticks in order, wash the dishes at every meal, arrange my invalid chair and pillows where no wind nor sun can disturb my out-door reveries. She never shirks tho churning, washing, or any of tho hardest work; in fact we all feel her tender care, and in our silent hearts bless her as ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A WOMAN SAILOR. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

A WOMAN SAILOR. The Times of India of December 2Stli Bays: A rather romantic incident had occurred on board the Flying Ventu, now in the harbor of Bombay. The captain shipped a young follow at Liverpool, under the name of Thomas Mrown, as a seaman, and after serving for a considerable time on board the ship, it was only yesterday discovered that he WOB a woman. She stated that she left her home at Aberdeen at 14 years of age, through tho ill-treatment of a stepmother, and having procured boy's clothing, went to sea. She contrived to preserve the secret of her sex for live years, and performed the duty of a seaman remarkably, taking her turn at the wheel, going aloft to furl royals, and was an adept in the nicer details of the profession. The captain,(Mr. Litter,) on becoming acquainted with the fact of his having a woman on board, was, perforce, compelled to part with her; and accordingly he took her to the acting chief magistrate on the 18th of December, at the Fort Police-court to...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
BEECHER ON WASHING DISHES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

BEECHER ON WASHING DISHES. Mr. T. K. Beeoher has had some experience in dish washing, and has dished it up for the public in the following characteristic way: The quiet fidelity with which "she" * will dish wash away her life for "him," is a marvel of endurance and grace. Just here is the servitude 1 of woman heaviest tin sooner is her work done than it requires to be done over again. Man works up jobs, ends them, and takes his pay. This pay can be translated into something else desirable. A man works all day, and draws pay for a day s work. This pay lures him, as oats a horse homeward bound. Thus men work by terms and jobs—and although work is endless as to quantity, yet when cut up thus into terms and jobs, we men go heartily on our journy, and count our mile-stones. Nat so with our mates. "She" mends our socks, and we put our irrepressible toe upon tin; darned spot, and she darns it again. She washes for the family, and the family make hast to send bark the same garments to be wa...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HOUSEHOLD READING. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

HOUSEHOLD READING.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A Few Hints About Cooking Game. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

A Few Hints About Cooking Game. The following hints about cooking gamebirds is taken substantially from Hearth and Home: The cooking of game is extremely simple, as very few kinds require a force-meat; stuffing and the sauce is easily made. The longer game is kept, provided it is not stale, the better—and it is better kept in the feathers and skins until just before cooking. When the feathers come oft' easily, the birds may be considered I'ipe for the spit or oven. Be very careful not to tear the skin while taking oft" the feathers. After removing the feathers, pass the blaze of a lighted white paper over the outside surface to singe off the hairs, which, if allowed to remain, would show very distinctly after the birds are rousted. Be careful in drawing the birds, and they will require very little washing. The less they are washed the better flavor they will be. Do not soak game in salt and water, as recommended by some. They say, "It is to take out the game flavor." If the game fla...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Frying Meat and Potatoes. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

Frying Meat and Potatoes. None of the rapid processes of cooking is so generally abused as frying. The fryingpan has awful sins to answer for. What untold horrors of dyspepsia have arisen from its smoky depths, like ghosts from witches' cauldrons ! The frizzle of frying meat is a warning knell on many an ear, saying, " Touch not, taste not, if you would not burn and writhe !" There are two ways of frying employed by the French cook. One is to immerse the article to be cooked in boiling fat —emphasis on the word boiling —and the philosophical principle is so completely to crisp every pore, at the first moment or two of immersion, as effectually to seal the interior against the intrusion of grease particles; it can then remain as long as may be necessary to thoroughly cook it, without imbibing any more of the boiling fluid than if it were enclosed in an egg-shell. The other method is to rub a perfectly smooth iron surface with just enough of some oily substance to prevent the meat fro...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Curing Meat. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

Curing Meat. To one gallon of water, add one and a half pounds of salt, half a pound of sugar, half an ounce of saltpeter, half an ounce 1 of potash. In this ratio the jnckle to be increased to any quantity desired, Let these be boiled together until all the dirt from the sugar rises to the top and is skimmed off. Then throw it into a tub to cool, and when cold, pour it over your beef or pork, to remain the usual time, say four or five weeks. The meat must be well covered with pickle, and should not be put down for at least two days after killing, during which time it should be slightly sprinkled with powdered saltpeter, which removes all the surface blood, etc., leaving the meat fresh and clean. Some omit boiling the pickle, and find it to answer well; though the operation of boiling purifies the pickle by throwing off the dirt always to be found in salt and sugar. The Germantown Telegraph, good authority, says if this receipt is properly tried it will never bo abandoned. How to Je...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Domestic Receipts. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

Domestic Receipts. How to Cook Old Fowls. —For the possible benefit of some of our young housekeepers, we will tell them how to cook an old chicken: —Prepai'o as for roasting, then boil three hours in a covered pot, with one quart of water, to which add two tablespoonfuls of vinegar; after which put in a pan, in a hot oven, for about one hour, to brown. The liquor in the pot to be prepared for gravy; should the water boil away to much, more should be added. The result is, the meat is as tender as young chicken, and some think richer and bettor. To Make Lea vex. —Stir corn meal in a pint of fresh buttermilk; add an old yeast cake dissolved in water; make it about the consistence of batter bread, and set in a warm place to rise. When well risen, add more meal, make it into cakes, and dry in the shade. To Wash Black Calico Without Fading.—Put it to soak in weak suds made boiling hot; let it stand until cool enough to handle, then wash and rinse it in the usual way. For stiffening, use ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Mechanical Hints. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

Mechanical Hints. Blacking for Harness. —A good blacking is made qt' 4 ounces of hog's lard, 10 ounces noatsfoot oil, 4 ounces yellow wax, 20 ounces ivory black, 16 ounces brown sugar, and 10 of water. Heat tho whole to boiling, and stir it till it becomes cod enough to handle, then roll it into balls about two inches in diameter. Another. —A cheap and good blacking can be made as follows: —Soften two pounds of glue in one pint of water, dissolve two pounds of soap (castile is the best), in one part of warm water; after the glue has become thoroughly soaked, cook it in a glue kettle, and then turn it into a large pot, place the pot over a hot fire and pour in the soap water, slowly stirring until it is well mixed; then add a half-pound of yellow wax cut in slices. Let the mass boil until the wax becomes melted, then add half a pint of neatsfoot oil and a sufficient quantity of lamp black to give it color; let it boil a few minutes, and it will bo lit for use. French Polish. —When a ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Life Thoughts. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

Life Thoughts. It is undoubtedly a duty to require riches, not for the condition which they make, but for the power they confer, The wisdom, however, properly to employ them demands even more earnest study and honest endeavor. — Simms. A wise man has found a remedy for unhappy marriages. It ia to abolish the institution of marriages entirely. A Good conscience is some times sold for money, but never brought with it. Moke flies are caught with a drop of honey than a hogshead of vinegar. A man had better be poisoned in his blood than in his principles. Death has nothing terrible in it but what life has made so. The glory of a people and of an age is always the work of a small number of great men, and disappears with them. Some often repent, yet never reform; they resemble a man traveling a dangerous path, who frequently starts and stops, but never turns back. Fight hard against a hasty temper. Anger will come, but resist it stoutly. A spark may seta house on lire. A fit of passion may...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
What a Man Knows. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

What a Man Knows. What a man can write out clearly, correctly and briefly, without book or reference of any kind, that he undoubtly knows, what ever else he may be ignorant of. For knowledge that falls short of that—knowledge that is vague, hazy, indistinct, uncertain —I for one profess no respect at all. And I believe there never Avas a time or country Avhero the influences of careful training were in that respect more needed. Men live in haste, write in haste, —I was going to say think in haste, only that the word thinking is hardly applicable to that large number who, for the most part, purchase their daily allowances of thought ready made. You find ten times more people now than ever before who can string words together with facility, and with a general idea of their meaning and are ready with a theory of some kind about matters. All that is very well so far as it goes, but it is one thing to do this and quite another to know how to use words as they should be used, or really to...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CANCER. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

CANCER. [Written for the Pukss.] Cancer, or more properly Carcinoma, is well known to be a malignant growth or tumor, which, unrestrained, tends to open uloeration, rapid destruction of tissue, and death of its unfortunate victim in comparatively a very short space of time. The name cancer was originally applied to the seirrhus, or hard variety of malignant tumors, from the supposed resemblance ■which the turgid blood-vessels, which radiate from it, Lear to the legs and claws of the crab. Carcinoma, from the Greek noun Kurkinos, an eating ulcer, is the name usually employed by surgeons, as it is alike applicable to all kinds of malignant ulcerating tumors, as well as cancroid ulcers or Epithelioma, the latter of which includes luput and cancer of the lips and face. As the name cancer is popularly applied to all forms of Carcinoma, I will use it in its popular acceptation in this article. Extensive Prevalence of Cancer. Canoer prevails to a much greater extent than most people are Le...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SLEEP, FAINTING, APOPLEXY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

SLEEP, FAINTING, APOPLEXY. When a man is asleep, his pulse beats and his lungs play, but he is without sense, and you can easily wake him up. If 8 person "faints," he, too, is without sense but he has no pulse and does not breathe. Apoplexy is between the two: the heart beats, the lungs play as in sleep, and there is no sense, as in a fainting lit, but you can't shake the man back to life. In Bleep, the face is natural. In a fainting tit, it has .the pallor of death. In apoplexy, it is swollen, turgid and fairly livid. If" a man is asleep let him alone, nature will wake him up as soon as he has got Bleep enough. When a person faints all that is neoded is to lay him down Mat on the floor and he will "come to" in double quick time. He fainted because the heart missed a beat, failed for an instant, failed only once to send the proper amount of blood to the brain. If you place the patient in a horizontal position, lay him on his back, it does not require much force of the heart to send ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HUMOROUS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

HUMOROUS. Tin's Eye, is the romantic name of a new agricultural settlement in Minnesota. A Goat is a good milker but a better butter. "You're a queer oliicken,"as the hen said when she hatched out a duck. A Missouri newspaper olaima that the hogs of that State are so fat that in order to find out where their heads are it is necessary to make them squeal and thon judge by the sound. The other day a little boy, while playing with some horses in an open lot, got his ear bitten off. The animal committed the mistake of attaching too literal a significance to the proverb that all flesh is grass. —They tell of a farmer in Kentucky who was so lazy that when he went to hoc corn he worked so slowly that the shade of his broad-brimmed hat'killed the plants. An Alabama planter has discovered a new and pleasant method of taking a cathartic. He shoots a lien with a charge of pills and serves her up for dinner. An old farmer once said to his sons: ••Hoys, don't you ever spekerlate, or wait for BUm...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
ONLY A SHADOW. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

ONLY A SHADOW. A story is told of a well-known gentleman, who sometimes imbibes too freely of the ardent, going home late at night recently, and mistaking his shadow outlined on the front d*>or for a man, he paused a little in surprise, and then lifting his hat very gracefully, bade him good evening. "A very plesant evening," said the gentleman. No reply. "This is my house, I believe," waving his hand. The hand of the shadow went through the same graceful curve. "I should like to get in, sir, if you'll stand aside;" but the shadow made no movement to let him pass. The gentleman was evidently surprised. Ho repeated his desire to pass in, but tho shadow remained still. His wife, hearing her husband's voice, looked through the window blind and seeing no one but himself, asked why he didn't come in. "So 1 would my dear, but this gentleman" —pointing to the shadow- '"insists on blocking up the door." His wife quietly opened the door, remark* ing, "That was your shadow." "Indee...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS At Sacbamento, Cal., f$Y THOS. M. LOGAN, M. D. Permanent Becretary of state board of 11> tilth. Lnt. 38 8141" V., Long. 121 W44"W. HightatLevee above mean low tide, at San r'rariei-cn, 71 teet. Ilit'lit ol lower ■urfaoeol mercury, W teet. The amount of cloudinegu is dexignatcd I>\ Hgures, 10 being entire olondinew; 8, half clouainese; 0, entire clearneix; and intermediate numbers in proportion. The force ol the wind is also registered in the same manner; 0 being a calm, 1 a very linht breeze, ami ID ahnrrieane, The mean*are derived from three daily readings at 7 a. M., i V. M., and !l P. M., in unitorinity with the arrangement* of the Smithsonian Institute. Hi:M.MtKS.-( 'liniily and foggy weather lias prevailed mure or lew during the entire week, which, with the absence of ■trong northerly winds, has secured the full benefit, for tlie growing crops, of the light rains that have fallen. The ruin-fall of this wed; sums up (1.411 iiicli...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
x
Loading...
x
x