ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: World's News, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
248,232 results
BREEDING FRUIT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

BREEDING FRUIT. The improvements in fruits are remarkable. It is possible to improve the varieties of fruit through the seedlings of a variety in two different ways. Firstly, by the accumulation of individual differences, appearing in seedlings in successive generations, the selections conforming to a preconceived ideal for the type. The varia- tions may be the result of the changes of surround- ings or the variations may be induced by the inter-crossing of different individuals. Secondly, varieties may be improved by the selection of independent variations, the variations not con- forming to any pre-conceived ideal nor being the result of the accumulation of previous variations which have been approaching a desired type. The selected variation is looked upon as com- pleted; it is a fine tree, giving fine fruit, but is not expected to yield fine progeny.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
APPRECIATION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

APPRECIATION, I never seen a more generus bloke than Bill.   Why, look 'ere, sooner an' see 'is mate withaht   a drink 'eed starve his "unprintable" wife.    

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ZOLA'S EARLY STRUGGLES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

ZOLA'S EARLY STRUGGLES. Few writers ever had to struggle so hard for recognition as M. Zola. As a young man the great French author lived in one small room, and for years went short of food. His condition became so terrible at one period that he had to resort to the expedient of catching sparrows by means of a trap, which he set every morning on the roof above his garret. Parisian sparrows being venturesome birds, M. Zola was able henceforward to make sure of at least one meal daily.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOPE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

HOPE. —#— HOPE TOLD A FLATTERING TALE. Mister Kruger still has hopes of independence.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A BURGLAR'S DISGUISE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

  A BURGLAR'S DISGUISE.   A Liverpool dentist tells how a man came to him recently who, although he had a substantial set of natural teeth, yet wished to have an ar- tificial lot that would case his own. The teeth were duly prepared. They gave him a prominent mouth, altering his features vastly. It subse- quently transpired that the man was a burglar in search of a disguise.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Boys and their Ways. SOME FUNNY STORIES. TOLD BY A SCHOOLMASTER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

Boys and their Ways. SOME FUNNY STORIES. —#— TOLD BY A SCHOOLMASTER. "G.H.," who has had a lengthy experience of   boys in schools, has written some of his experi-   ences in a recent number of the "Spectator." They may not be absolutely new in every in- stance, but they are at least novel and enter- taining. Here are a few of them:—   QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS. The majestic, awe-inspiring style of teaching is happily now seldom practised, and the scholar is allowed his hearty laugh at any chance gleam of wit or comic blunder on the part of his school- fellows. The following examples have at differ- ent times come under my notice, and where pos- sible I have retained the precise words used by the children. Teacher (to newly-joined pupil): "What's your name?" Boy: "Smiff." Teacher: "Where do you come from?" Boy: "I dun'no." Teacher: "Ever been to school before?" Boy (more brightly): "Yus." Teacher: ''Was it a Board school?" Boy: "No, brick." "What i...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A MYSTERIOUS BILL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

A MYSTERIOUS BILL. A fearful bill, found in the pocket of a man arrested for theft, mystified the police con- siderably, and nearly succeeded in bringing its owner into serious difficulties. It ran thus:— s. d. 1 False Oath 1 6 1 Lured to Ruin 1 6 1 Cloven Foot 4 0   1 Mad Passion 4 0 1 Hidden Terror 1 6 1 Murder 6 0 18 6 It turned out to be an account for a job lot of theatrical posters, bought up cheap.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HINTS ON BREAD. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

HINTS ON BREAD.   Bread made from wheat flour, when taken out   of the oven, is unprepared for the stomach. It   should go through a change, or ripen, before it is   eaten. Young persons, or persons in the enjoy-   ment of vigorous health, may eat bread immedia-   tely after being baked without any sensible in-   jury from it, but weakly and aged persons can-   not, and none can eat such without doing harm   to the digestive organs. Bread, after being   baked, goes through a change similar to the   change in newly-brewed beer or newly-churned   butter-milk, neither being healthy until after   the change. During the change in bread it   sends off a large portion of carbon or unhealthy   gas and imbibes a large portion of oxygen or   healthy gas. Bread has, according to the com- &...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A SWISS MOUNTAIN. LIKELY TO TOPPLE OVER ANY MOMENT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

A SWISS MOUNTAIN.     LIKELY TO TOPPLE OVER ANY MOMENT. A traveller in Switzerland says that the moun- tain called the Rocher de Clusette, in the Swiss Alps, is about to topple over into the busy val- ley of Travers. The valley of Travers lies in the Jura moun- tains, and through it runs the Jura-Simplon railway. Down its narrow gorge also rushes the River Le Reuse, a small stream in winter, but a swollen torrent when the warm spring sunshine begins to melt the mountain snows. The valley is just about wide enough for the river and the railroad in some places, and in others it opens out so that small cities lie in the embrace of the hills and straggle up their sides. Here and there are hotels much patro- nised by tourists, and many schools for girls are scattered through the valley. Into this valley may fall at any time a great mass of the mountain, estimated to amount to 500,000 cubic yards of rock. Close to the foot of the mountain lie the quaint little ci...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SEVERE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

SEVERE. A young man. contemplating matrimonial fe-   licity, took his fair intended to the home of his   parents, in order that she might be introduced   to the old folk.   "This is my future wife," said the young man,   proudly, turning to paterfamilias, who was of a   canny turn of mind. "Now, father, tell me     frankly what you think of her."   The old man eyed the blushing bride-elect for   fully two minutes; then answered with deli-   beration:       "Well, John, I can only say that you have   shown much better taste than she has."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN OLD BARONY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

AN OLD BARONY.   —♦—   Although the Baroness Beaumont is the   youngest peeress in her own right in Great Bri-   tain, she will be entitled to take precedence of   all her elders at the Coronation, for the Barony   of Beaumont is the oldest in England, being   created in 1300. The Baroness, who succeeded   her father when little more than a year old,   owing to his sad death when out shooting, is   now seven years old. She is a chubby little   girl, with brown hair and blue eyes, and does   not know the meaning of fear. She has a pas-   sion for horses, and makes a round of the   stables at Carlton Towers at least once a day,   loaded with sugar and apples.      

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NEW "CURES" FOR CANCER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

NEW "CURES" FOR CANCER.           Great attention is just now being directed in   London towards what are said to be "cures" for   the dread disease of cancer.   The story of the rapid recovery of Lady Mar- garet Marsham (told in last week's "World's   News"), brought about, it is said, by partaking   of an infusion of fresh green violet leaves, has   caused much comment in medical circles, but of course one recovery is not sufficient evidence   that a cure for cancer has been found.   Dr. John Gilman, Professor at the Hahnemann Medical College, Chicago, claims, however, that   during the last eighteen months he has treated   over 50 cases of cancer, including many forms   of the disease, and has failed to find a single   one which did not yield readily to his treat...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHAT THE AGED CAN REMEMBER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

WHAT THE AGED CAN REMEMBER.       In alluding to the statement that there is   no foundation for the tradition that the late   Dowager Lady Carew was present at the famous   ball given by the Duchess of Richmond on the   eve of Waterloo, the London correspondent of   the "Manchester Guardian" remarks that one   thing is certain, however—that, inasmuch as she   was seventeen at the time, she was not too   young for the victory to make a vivid impres-   sion on her. That would be nothing compared   with other feats of memory. One of the most   remarkable of these is that recorded four years   ago in "The Times" by Mr. Gorell, of Coltishall,   Norwich. Mr. Gorell, who was born at Kirkby   Lonsdale in 1804, had at the age of 93 a clear   recollection of the...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SAFETY FROM LIGHTNING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

SAFETY FROM LIGHTNING. As a rule, during a thunderstorm one is safer in a forest than in the open country, because in the latter a person is a "raised object," attract- ing the lightning, while in the woods the bolts select the highest trees. Investigation in many forests has shown that lightning has its dis- tinct preferences. For instance, oak trees are struck 48 times oftener than beech trees. Some trees, like the beech, walnut, etc., contain much fatty matter, while others—the oak, poplar, wil- low, and ash—are rich in starch. Lightning rather avoids the former, preferring the latter —isolated willows and poplars being particu- larly liable to visits from lightning. If one holds a finger near the conductor of an elec- trical machine there is a violent discharge—a miniature stroke of lightning; but if we hold a needle similarly, there will be no violent dis-   charge, the electricity flowing from the hand   through the needle-point neutralising the elec-...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THEY HAD AGREED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

THEY HAD AGREED. "Gentlemen of the jury," asked the clerk of   the court, "have you agreed upon a verdict?"   "We have" replied the foreman. "The verdict   of the jury is that the lawyers have mixed this   case up to such an extent that we don't know anything at all about it."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WOULD YOU BE POPULAR? On this subject the following hints, which are, of course, "wrote sarcastic," are worth attention:— [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

WOULD YOU BE POPULAR?   On this subject the following hints, which are,   of course, "wrote sarcastic," are worth atten-   tion:—     "Always talk about yourself. It shows indi-   viduality and a high degree of self-respect.   "Talk frequently. People may lose valuable   ideas by your silence; besides, it is wicked to   waste time by listening to the idle clatter of   other folk.   "When you are hearing a story you have heard     before, do not fail to interrupt and tell the   narrator that he is relating something as old as   the hills. It saves valuable time, and will pre-   vent him from feeling foolishly vain of his     powers.   "Always make as much litter as you can. It   may provide employment for those who might &am...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE RUSSIAN PEASANT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

THE RUSSIAN PEASANT. —♦—   A very quaint and happy-go-lucky fellow is the Russian peasant, according to a recent visi- tor to the Czar's dominions. As a farm laborer he is terribly conserva- tive, and resolutely declines to use any but the most primitive implements. Immense sums have been practically wasted by rich proprietors on expensive farm machinery which the stub- born peasantry will not use. Yet the Russian moujik (as he is called) is a clever workman in his own way, and performs wonders with a kind of axe which forms almost his only edged tool. He has a kindly, contented nature, varied oc- casionally with fits of sadness, and he is pas- sionately fond of music. The horses he drives must be hung with tinkling bells, and he is never happier than when riding across the steppes, carolling one of his national songs. He lives in a log hut, all the furniture in which is invariably made by himself. In the matter of food he is easily satisfied. He is fond of mushrooms, w...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PREPOSTEROUS JUSTICE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

PREPOSTEROUS JUSTICE. One night recently at Alford, in Lincolnshire, (Eng.), a youth obtained a light for his cigarette by striking a match against a tradesman's door- post. The atrocious outrage was witnessed by a superintendent of police, who informed the tradesman. Strange to say, the tradesman de- clined to take any action. But the superinten- dent, who is seemingly imbued with a deep re- verence for the sanctity of private door-posts, was determined that so flagrant an offence should not pass unpunished, and he accordingly took out a summons against the culprit, under the Malicious Damage Act. The case came on be- fore a Bench consisting of the Rev. Canon War- ren, Messrs. John Higgins, William Hoff, R. Corey, and J. R. Smithson, J's.P., and the actu- ally imposed a fine of eight shillings. Was there ever a more preposterous prosecution or ridicu-   lous decision? Seeing that the party whose door-post was scratched had refused to sum-     ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MISANTHROPIC. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

MISANTHROPIC. "There is a work," said the high-browed youth, "which, even though it may not bring me wealth, will bring me fame." "Again the folly of youth!" sneered the cynical philosopher. "Why will you never realise that fame, such as you seek, is merely a device of the avaricious world by which a man is kept poor, and by which, at the same time, his credi- tors are always kept advised of his where- abouts?"      

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Gun that Failed. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

A Gun that Failed. The Gathmann gun which is shown in the sketch has, according to New York telegrams, proved a failure.   The test to which the gun was submitted is   spoken of as the most expensive ever undertaken   by the United States authorities.   General Miles and several other distinguished army officers were present. The gun tested was invented by Mr. Louis Gath- mann, and Congress, against the advice of the artillery experts, recently appropriated £12,000 for testing it. The gun weighs 59 tons, and is 44ft. long; it has an 18in. bore, and throws a shell of 1860lb., of which 600lb. is wet gun cotton. The gun was charged with powder, and the in- ventor asserted that it would throw a shell 16 miles at a velocity of 2000ft. per second, and that it could annihilate a warship. A huge target representing the entire side of a battleship was used. It was protected with the heaviest Krupp armor. When the gun was fired practically n...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x