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Elephind.com contains 7,005 items from Richmond Guardian, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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St. Ignatius' Bowling Club. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 24 February 1917

St. Ignatius' Bowling Club. Playing a two-rink game at North cote last Saturday, a decisive victory was scored by St. Ignatius' over the local team. The conditions were per fect, the green drawing well. Atten tion to practice during the week by St. Ignatius' players manifested itself in a pronounced manner during the match, very few mistakes being made, each rink being well up at the con clusion. T. Finlayson's rink was a strong proposition, leading from start to finish. Cr. Barcelo, as leader, set a meritorious example at each end, frequently resting the jack, whilst Messrs Kennedy and Douglas, follow ing the skipper's instructions, put in some valuable work. "Dreadnought" Clifford skippered the other rink in his usual thorough manner. H. Smith put up a remarkable record by ricochetting off five short bowls, eventually lying the shot. E. Hede, as leader in this rink, was excellent, whilst C. Green seconded his efforts admirably, though displaying a tendency to play a bowl or two in...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
REASONS. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 24 February 1917

REASONS. Some of- the reasons advanced by the cousin of the butcher who serves the sister-in-law of our landlady for the return of a certain ship to Fre mantle: A-The ship's boiler blew out. B-Her water-ballast caught fire. C-The beer gave out. D-The captain wanted another whisky. E-She collided with the wreckage of the Waratah. F-The second cook wanted to see his dying grand-mother. G-The chief officer's .gramaphone went bung. H-A passenger lost his pyjamas. I-An actor remembered he. hadn't paid his board in Perth. J-The chief engineer, wanted to win the Ugly Man's Competition. K-The bar was leaking. L-The second steward wanted to see "The Clutching Shadow." M-The bo's'un had forgotten his tobacco. N-The cork-puller was running hot. 0-The captain wanted a few more Vie. Newton yarns. P-White ants were found in the ship's log. Q-The fifth engineer knediome thing good for the Trots. " R-The stokers wanted to hear the Rev. Cox. S-The purser wanted to see his soldier's allowance. -Perth...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
OUR SOLDIERS' CHRISTMAS CHEERFUL STORIES TOLD IN MANY LETTERS HOME. "THE SNOW LAY ON THE GROUND." "EVERYTHING TO MAKE US COMFORTABLE." [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 24 February 1917

OUR SOLDIERS' CHRISTMAS CHEERFUL STORIES TOLD IN MANY LETTERS HOME. "THE SNOW LAY ON THE GROUND." "EVERYTHING TO MAKE US COMFORTABLE." Richmond casualties this week in clude: Killed in Action. Sergeant G. Raven. Private P Williams. Seriously Wounded and Dangerously III. Private T. T. Taylor. Seriously Ill. Private J. Will. Wounded. Private E. A. Bennett. Enlistments from Richmond since our last list include:-T. Duggan, W. E. Matthews, J. M. Watkins, T. F. Bellairs, H. J. Layton, S. T. Martin, J. G. Clark, R. H. Faulkner, I. I. Leach, W. G. Popplestone, D. H. E:eachcroft. Private Jim Adams, son of Mrs. Adams, Gordon-street, employed an old saying to begin a letter to his sis ter, which he sent from ''Sommewhere" on December 12. "It never rains, but it pours," he said. Private Adams al luded to the fact that he had very soon after opening a large box for warded by Miss Adams espied an en ticing Christmas pudding; a general distribution to French soldiers was made, and he received anot...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Ivy Shilling Scores. STAR TURN IN LONDON. DANCE WITH FRED LESLIE WINS LAUDER'S INEXPENSIVE FROCK. London. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 24 February 1917

Ivy Shilling Scores. -STAR TURN IN LONDON. DANCE WITH FRED LESLIE WINS LAUDER'S INEXPENSIVE FROCK. London. All theatrical London is now talk ing of Ivy Shilling and Fred Leslie, for they have made perhaps the big gest hit of the just-ending year with their "Dance du Vaurien" in Mr. Bob Courtneidge's new revue at the Shaftesbury Theatre. It can now be confessed that both Miss Shilling and Mr. Leslie have had an exceedingly hard row to hoe in this cold and conservative country. When first they appeared at the Em pire in their "ju-jitsu" dance Australia was told that they had made good; but, unfortunately, it was not true their style was new to the British public, and they failed to make any lasting impression. Shortly after wards they broke the dance-partner ship which had earned them such fame throughout Australia, and taking different roads they fought strenuous ly for the due recognition of their un doubted talents until both had al most given up hope. Miss Shilling was given chanc...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
In and Out of School. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 24 February 1917

In and Out of School. Adrian Taebring and Leonard Mil gate, of Cremorne State school, who entered for the Swinburne Technical College examinations, have succeed ed in gaining junior technical schol arships at that institution. was a member of St. Stephen's Church and the Men's Bible Class. Sergeant Raven was one of the first men to enlist at the outbreak of war. He volunteered at the Docker-street drill hall, and was drafted into the 6th Battalion. He was at the first landings at Gallipoli, where a large number of his battalion were killed and he was subsequently wounded. Shrapnel penetrated his lungs. Re joining his battalion in Egypt, he vol unteered as bomber, and was promo ted from corporal to sergeant. He was sent to France, and has been in ONE OF THE "SIXTH" SERGEANT GEORGE RAVEN A Richmond boy who took part in the Gallipoli Landing and has been killed in France.' the fighting line there for 12 months. The last letter received from Ser geant Raven mentioned that he had been fi...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TOPICS OF THE WEEK. Personal. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 24 February 1917

TOPICS OF THE WEEK. Personal. The Autumn Sales, the Autumn Sales. The three-guinea boots that jostle the 13/11 shoes reduced to 9/11; the bronze toes with white uppers, "very Parisian," which were made in Burnley-street; the adorable pyjamas, made of apple-green crepe de chine with little white bobby things all over them, which were and now are so much and so much, and for which the business girl sighs. Does the factory gi. buy her fur coat at the sales or on the instalment plan, or does her very best young man trap bunny and send him along piecemeal? The Au tumn Sales, the Autumn Sales. Hurry along, ladies! This way to the right, please! Frank Sheedy, in Sydney, greets an old identity. "Strolling down Castle reagh-street the other day, I was hail ed by our effusive mutual friend, Percy Brunton, the Peanut Prince and hero of so many police-court appear ances and holder of the Australian re cord for unpaid fines. Percy, fully caparisoned in silk hat, frock coat and heelless boots, so...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Richmond War Service Committee Does Special Work—Claims of Soldiers' Wives for Assistance Carefully Considered. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 24 February 1917

Richmond War Service Committee Does Special Work-Claims of Sol diers' Wives for Assistance Care fully Considered. Unknown to the big majority of peo ple, a committee of Richmond council lors is working silently and earnestly on one of the biggest side issuef of the war. This is the special war ser vice committee. It is composed of the Mayor and Councillors Kemp, George, O'Connell and Davies. Claims for as sistance sent in by dependents and re latives of soldiers to the State War Council are, of necessity, subjected to inquiry. It Is in this connection that the council's committee comes into direct action. They are far better seized with local conditions than any purely Melbourne City body possibly could be, and they are giving to each case a kindly consideration, but with the full knowledge of all facts before them. The State War Coun cil's allotment or other action largely depends on the local committee's re commendation. To be a member of such a committee in a district like Richmo...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
P.L.C. (Phelan's Labor Council) Does Not Appreciate "Guardian" Publicity.—Printing to be Done by City Firm in Future.—Further Parody on Workers' Movement. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 24 February 1917

P.L.C. (Phelan's Labor Council) Does Not Appreciate "Guardian" Pub liclty.-Printing to be Done by City Firm in Future.-Further Parody on Workers' Movement. The Oddfellows' Hall, Church-st., was filled on Tuesday evening with members and visitors to the local P.L.C. Perhaps the attendance was swelled to more than ordinary dimen sions by reason of an unsigned note which had been delivered to "cer tain" members asking them to "be sure and attend the meeting next Tuesday." The president, who sat at his table minus papers and the usual correspondence, declared the adjourned meeting open for business. For a moment there was silence, Then all eyes turned to Mr. Horatio Phelan, the mover, at the last meet ing, of the motion for adjournment. He had then declared that "he had plenty of business" for the meeting now assembled. Mr. Phelan rose and said he wished to draw the pre siaent's attention to .page 28 of the constitution, wherein it was stated that the election of officers should take pl...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Ladies' Letter. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 24 February 1917

Ladies' Letter. Skirts are slowly but surely lengthening, and the straight, thin silhouette is gradually coming back. Rather a pity, isn't it? for the abbre viated skirt is so beautifully sanitary, and in wet weather it is an absolute treat. There is grief and dismay in cer tain sections of the feminine world, for all passports have been cancelled. You can imagine the sorrow of pros pective brides, with trousseaux all pre pared in readiness to trip off to the other end of the world to be married. One was to have left Melbourne this week. As for those who were going to see long-absent husbands or, may be, soldier sons, naturally they are dis appointed, though, perhaps, their case is not so hard. But what about those who have already started and are not yet out of Australian waters. It is said they will be sent back from Perth and the permit to travel withdrawn. Most awkward, you know. But, still, it is only what should have been done long ago, for not only do women tra velling in the...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Surplus of Khaki. AUSTRALIAN BETTER THAN ENGLISH. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 24 February 1917

Surplus of Khaki. AUSTRALIAN BETTER THAN ENGLISH. Nobody except the military authori ties knows how much khaki is in stock. But it is now stated that the stores are full to overflowing, and that unless the war lasts for a much longer period than ,is expected by the greatest pessimist in the community, there will still be tens of thousands of yards-possibly millions-on. hand when peace is declared. When Australia's first army was being equipped, it was expected that the local mills would be unable to keep pace with the demand for mili bary tweed. To provide against any shortage the authorities secured a consignment from Britain. Just how much khaki was imported is not known, lot it was certainly not less than 1,000,000 yards. Experts say that the imported material will not bear comparison with the local pro duction. Its color is bad, and it is a harsh tweed made of low-grade crossbred wool. Shortly the embargo against filling orders for private manufacturers will be lifted. Fortunate...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Mice in the Wheat. RE-BAGGING NECESSARY. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 24 February 1917

- Mice in the Wheat. RE-BAGGING NECESSARY. ---MIice .are seriously interfering with the wheat stacks in some cities. One agent; who had to start re-bagging this week, calculated that he will lose 11 per cent. The re-bagging is entailing a lot of expense, in addition to the loss of grain. The mice abound in millions, and it is a mystery where they come from.

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
From Various Sources. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 24 February 1917

From Various Sources. Wilhelm: "Where, oh, where, are nly.little boats gone to?" The wild waves are saying, "Ask Jellicoe!" "Do you get plenty of sleep despite the daylight saving?" asked the visi tor to small Edward. *Yes, ma'am," he answered, "Mam ima puts me to bed every night at 8 )'clock." '"To keep you healthy?" he was ask ed. "No, ma'am," was the reply.' "It's so she can mend my clothes." Somebody with a "just as good' substitute for food can make a hit in Europe just now.-Boston "Herald." From a picture postcard recently re ceived from the trenches: Ejnglish Soldier: (as pretty girl passes): "I wish that wuz the little girl I left at home." Irish Soldier: "Och shure, if that was me little colleen!" Scotch Soldier: "Hoots, mon! if von were my ain little lassie I'd get special leave." Australian Soldier: "I wish it was lark." Regarding Mr. D. C. McGrath, M.P.,' now on service in France, a good. story which has the merit of being: true is told about the last election.1 This was...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ROOSEVELT'S "SIMPLE BATH." [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 24 February 1917

ROOSEVELT'S "SIMPLE BATH." To err is human, of course, and thai must be the sole excuse a composi tor can offer when he commits a more than usually stupid blunder. "The vast audience rent the air with their snouts," was a not very complimentary passage in the report of a political meeting that one erring. "comp." set up. The "St. Alban's Diocesan Gazette" seems more than once to have had great difficulty in properly printing: the word "archdeacons." Once it was represented as being "archdeadons." The archdeacons referred to must have been extremely indignant, as they have always considered them selves very much alive Another time "archbeacons" found its way into the "Gazette." Perhaps this countered their displeasure at the former reference, for ndbody dis likes being looked upon as a shining light. But the paper that excelled itself was the American one which describ ed the scene of Roosevelt taking his oath of office as President in the fol lowing sentence: "It was a spectacle nev...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Then Silence Reigned. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 24 February 1917

Then Silence Reigned.. One of the best stories in F. Laur iston Bullard's "Famous War Corre spondents" is one concerning the late Bennet Burleigh. It was the night before the battle o the Atbara River, and Burleigh spent the time visiting the various troops lying out in the open. "It. was whilst walking softly," he wrote, "so as not to disturb light sleepers, that I overheard a seritimen tal Seaforth Highlander say to his comrade: "'Ah, Tam, how many thousands there are> at hame across the sea thinking o' us the nicht!' "'Right, Sandy,' replied the chum; 'arnd how many millions there are that don't care a damn.. Go to sleep, ye fool!' "And silence again fell upon that corner of the square."

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 24 February 1917

SDON'T TRU~ST YOUR MEMORY ~ TO THE L IEVER-CHANGING LIKENESS OF YOUR _ KITH and KIN or PRIIEND. ____ E xpert artists ensure perfect . $ _____________________ othing left to chance--care- Pi~ fulness predominates. L ife-like portraits from any _ TH ERE IS NO photo. NEED) TO WORRY A lterations made if nece s-s-. sary. <-aY When you place an order for an Enilargement with us sue eputation our recommenda- cess is assured. Our unique and great know roups from various photos ledge combined with our on one picture. practicability, is yours for the Sasking. Enquiries welcomed. Call or ask us to call. " ~ ilitary photos are a special- COME TO-DAY. Excellent results from the most faded photo. 'Don't delay any longer -- -*'"That's the place." N on-Fadeable Guaranteed. ake down that old photo to S atisfaction is assured. THIS IS THE PLACE "WHERE THEY DO THEM BETTER." 'PHONE-CENTRAL 1430. WRITE OR CALL. I,+t~ In~ternational Paortr~aits Co., ' , (L. A & H. A. LIVINGSTON), S434 ...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE "LITTLE" STOP. To the Editor. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 24 February 1917

THE "LITTLE" STOP. To the Editor. Sir,-With pot and brush, a young man alighted from a Swan-st. tram on Monday morning, and painted out the red and blue compulsory tram stop signs at Little Lennox-street. On the following morning the same young man with, presumably, the same pot and brush, again alighted from the car and painted the red and blue com pulsory tram-stop signs up again. What's the joke? If the Tram Trust is so eager to spend money why not buy a water-cart and make some effort to squelch the .colossal tramway dust nuisance. Might I mention, also, that the trams did not stop at Little Lennox-street when the sign was painted out, but as soon as it was up again they began the stop once more -and are still at it. Yours, "TICKLED." Story of Franco-Prussian War Has Charming Qualities.-Bluebird Pro duction of The Bugler of Algiers to be Screened at Crown, Victoria Street. Particular interest attaches in these times to a film such as Tlhe Bugler of Algiers, the Bluebird pro duct...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
OPEN COLUMN THE RICHMOND COUNCIL EMPLOYES' PICNIC. (To the Editor.) [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 24 February 1917

OPEN COLUMN THE RICHMOND COUNCIL EMPLOYES' PICNIC. (To the Editor.) Sir,-Now that it is over and I can not be accused of attempting to cast a stone at the success of a workers' annual holiday, allow me to use an inch or two of space to poInt out the overlapping and a few other etceteras that have come into being with the growth of the annual picnic of the Richmond municipal employes. As conducted in former times, no excep tion could be taken to the employes' picnic. It was, as is the case with all other firms and employes' picnics, in tended as a happy outing and oppor tunity for re-union and cementing of friendships between the various work ers employed in kindred interest, and their families. Such picnics served a good purpose, and, just as employes of a private firm are invariably en couraged by their employers to pro mote and hold such outings, so was the council, in the old days, justified in providing facilities and practical support for the annual picnic of their employes. Bu...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Her Reason. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 24 February 1917

Her Reason. In his amusing book "The Happy Irish," Mr. Harold Begbie tells the following story which was related to him by a doctor in a small town in. Ireland. "I was rung up pretty late one night," said the doctor, "by a .peas ant from an outlying village fifteen miles away. It was' in the days be fore I had a car. The wind was blow ing horribly, the rain was sweeping against the house, and it was deadly cold. "The peasant asked me, rather shanefacedly, if I could come and see his mother. I invited him to come in. "'Patrick,' I said to him, 'your mother is a very old woman.' "'I know that, doctor,' he admitted. "'She's over eighty, Patrick.' "'She's all that, doctor.' "'And nothing that I could do to night would be of the smallest use to her.' "'Sure, doctor,' said he, 'I know very well it's the truth you are tell ing me, but me poor ould mother, do you see, would have me come and fetch you because she does not want to die a natural death."'

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOUSEHOLD HINTS. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 24 February 1917

HOUSEHOLD HINTS. Newspapers cut as finely as possible make a good filling for cushions. SA slice or two of orange added to tomato soup almost immediately be fore serving greatly improves the fla vor. When making marmalade or jam, or anything of a kindred nature, rub some butter over the bottom of the preserving pan. The contents will then neither burn nor boil over. If suet is melted in the oven and mut into jars it will keep excellently. 3nd is far easier to chop in this form. Puddings will keep for a longer length of time if made with suet that has been treated in this way. To remove stains made by tea or coffee, wet the spot with cold water ind let stand for two or three hours. Then wash with cold water and hard soap. If this does not take out the stains repeat the treatment. Before washing new lace curtains, calico, or anything containing lime, soak overnight in water to which a penny packet of salt has been added. This takes out all the lime, and conse quently saves much soap a...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MARVELLOUS MACHINES. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 24 February 1917

MARVELLOUS MACHINES. Much of the inventive genius nowa days is centred on devices that will do away with the handling of food. A man has invented a machine which removes the Chinaman's hands from canned salmon that goes into homes practically everywhere. It is known as the "iron chink." It will do the work of fifty Chinese and clean 30,000 fish in a day. The salmon is clean ed, chopped, packed in cans with fat and lean properly balanced, weighed, sealed and cooked by machinery. A Los Angeles man has invented a printing press to be installed in baker ies, which prints wrappers in colors and wraps the bread without handling. :A young man was observed recently in Los Angeles selling post-cards whereby he was making his way around the world and educational ex penses. He lost both legs and an arm in a trolley accident. The motor he travelled in was designed especially for his use and presented to him by the well-known automobilist, Barney Oldflold.

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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