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Elephind.com contains 658,475 items from Columbia Daily Spectator, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,990 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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OUR EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1879

OUR EXCHANGES. WE naturally look to the sporting papers for reliable times and information, and forgive the daily papers when we read that the 16 lb. shot has been put 70 odd feet, while the hammer has been thrown 2 m. 155., and so were naturally surprised when the Sportsman tells us of a quarter-mile being run in 5:04, and of a 5 mile go-as-you-please won in 8 m. 5 s. " This is cool, to say the least of it, especially when coming from such a recognized authority on sporting as the Sportsman. Were we not acquainted with Mr Plummer, we should have put this effusion down as a 'Fresh' composition." WILLIAM WOOD, in the May number of Brent ands Aquatic Monthly and Sporting Gazeteer, makes two uncalled for slurs at Columbia which are out of place, since both are incorrect. In the Half-Mile Run at Gilmore's, April sth, 1879, Baumeisler, a C. C. N. Y. man, and frequenter of the Y. M. C. A. gymnasium, was ruled out for a foul, on his own testimony. In the Intercollegiate meeting last year, ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SHAVINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1879

SHAVINGS. HE was a senior, and as he fetched up at the bottom of the slippery steps, he ejaculated : " Hell—{just then a professor came gliding around the corner) —is paved with good resolutions." The Prof, smiled blandly, went to his room and gave that senior Max. — Ex. THE other day a student translated " Ich will keine Alte, keine Verbluhte, sondern eine Junge, Frische:" "I want no faded old maid, but a young Freshwoman." — Beacon. SCENE : Union R. R. Horse-Car (party of sophomores coming home from a "little supper.") No. i. " Don't make so much noise, Fred, you'll give yourself away to those freshmen opposite." Fred. (Hie) "I don't care, Freshie (hie) 's good's any other man ; mere accident of birth."— Crimson. PROF, in Law Recitation: " Mr. what is excusable homicide ?" Senior, promptly: "Excusable homicide is when a man kills himself in self defence." — Ex.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1879

The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. IV. No. IX. NEW YORK, JUNE 15th, 1879. WHOLE NO. 38 Board of Editors, 1879-1880. WILLIAM S. SLOAN, 'Bl, Managing Editor. WILLIAM F. MORGAN, 'BO, Business Editor. WILLIAM H. TAYLOR, 'BO. WILLIAM B. MCVICKAR, 'BO. J. DUANE LIVINGSTON, 'BO. REGINALD H. SAYRE, 'Bl. GEORGE H. TAYLOR, 'Bl. WILLIAM K. OTIS, 'B2. C. D. STARR, 'Bl, S. of M. A. GERALD HULL, 'B2, S. of M. CHARLES E. CALDWELL, B. A., S. of L. TERMS. Per annum, (18 numbers.) in advance, - $2.00. Single copies, - - - - - -15 cts. Remittances by mail should be addressed to HENRY G. PAINE, Treasurer, No. 26 West 30th Street, N. Y. Exchanges, contributions, and all other communications should be addressed to THE COLUMBIA SPECTATOR, Columbia College, N. Y. Students and graduates of the various departments of Columbia are requested to contribute articles, verses, letters, and information.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CURRENT TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1879

CURRENT TOPICS. ON the day after the race at Philadelphia, THE SPECTATOR will issue a Supplement, with an account of said race and the late Cricket matches. The list of Freshmen admitted, will also be given. This Supplement will be mailed to all names on our regular subscription list as well as to every purchaser of this number. WE call attention to the letters under our Correspondence concerning the Alumni Prize. Both have been written by special request, and only after the most careful thought and consideration. It has been thought best to let our readers take their own view of the subject from the letters, and for this reason THE SPECTATOR will refrain from any comment or criticism on either side, a position we rarely take on a college subject. WE are constantly hearing complaints from parties who have obtained scholarships, about the manner of paying said prizes. In place of the winner being presented with a check for $lOO on the Commencement stage, he is told that the first ins...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CANOEING. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1879

CANOEING. THOSE who have never experienced the delights of this entrancing sport, can form no idea of the enjoyment felt by the enthusiastic canoeist. It has been said that the canoeist enjoys all the pleasures of yatching on a small scale. True, he misses the charm of sea-sickness; but then, the other delights of yachtsmen, such as head winds, calms, small bunks, hot cabins, etc., are showered upon him in such profusion, that they fully atone for the loss. One of the great boons of the canoeist is the rubber bag in which he keeps his perishable stores, and which he has, on some occasions, to open about once in every mile. The rubber also imparts a pleasing flavor to his provisions. What can be more enjoyable after a good hard day's paddle, than to find yourself on a lake with the nearest house on the opposite share, and distant from you something like a mile and a-half; while a good strong breeze is blowing dead a-head, and your canoe skims over the water in every direction except ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
A BOON COMPANION. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1879

A BOON COMPANION. MY pony, 'tis of thee, Ever endeared to me, I sing good cheer. I love thy severed leaves Pinned up in dainty sheaves, Whence my untutored mind receives The proper steer. While in my chair I sit, Swift o'er thy page I flit . Fast in my tracks ; But when " Place table" sounds, Then how each point resounds, My lore the learned Prof, astounds — I scoop the max. ! Let all who live their larks, Let all who grind for marks The sound prolong ; Bless those whose light hath shone, Who for our faults atone, Smart, Buckley, Merivale, and Bohn— A glorious throng ! B.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SEVENTY-NINE'S FAREWELL SUPPER. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1879

SEVENTY-NINE'S FAREWELL SUPPER. THE class of '79 has assembled around the festive board only twice. The former supper was held at the close of freshman year, the latter took place on the evening of Thursday, June sth, at the Union Square Hotel, and was, in all respects, a most enjoyable event. Doubtless it is generally known that the question of holding Class Day exercises was discussed by the seniors at a recent meeting. In view of the disordered condition of the college grounds and various other considerations, it did not seem expedient to attempt any such celebration, so the class wisely determined to follow the example of '7B, and hold a farewell supper as a substitute. It is, perhaps, to be regretted that the affair was not arranged for an earlier date, as in that case a better attendance would have been secured. As it was, several men were obliged to leave the city between examinations and commencement, and their absence on so important an occasion was much regretted. On the o...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
COMMENCEMENT. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1879

COMMENCEMENT. THE 125 th Commencement of the College may be regarded as one of the most successful ever held. In spite of the altitude of the thermometer, the Academy of Music was crowded with the fair friends of the happy graduates and lucky prizewinners. After three pieces by the orchestra, the exercises were opened by the Rev. Dr. Duffie, Chaplain of the College, with a prayer. This was followed by the ORATIONS. 1. Greek Salutatory —Edward J. Runk. 2. Latin Poem —E. R. A. Seligrnan.* 3. Oration—"The Advancement of Science." Otis M. Munroe, S. of M. 4. Oration —"The End of this World as an Inhabited Planet." William Hallock. 5. Oration—" The Advantage of a Large City for the Location of a University." Edwin Ludlow, S. of M. 6. Oration —"The Future of Arbitration." Theodore B. Foster. Afler the orations, the names of the successful competitors for the various prizes were announced as follows : HONOR MEN OF CLASS OF '79. FIRST HONOR CLASS. 1. E.J. Runk, 2. E. R. A. Seligman^ 3. Will...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE HARLEM REGATTA. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1879

THE HARLEM REGATTA. A BEAUTIFUL day and fine water attended the day of the Harlem Spring Regatta June 12th. W. B. Curtis officiated as referee in the absence of Frank Brown who had accepted that position. The first two races were the trial heats of the fours. Columbia was represented in the first heat by C. Eldredge, bow, A. H. Van Sinderen, 2, H. G. Ridabock, 3, J. T. Goodwin, stroke; being the Philadelphia Four with the exception of Goodwin taking the place of Painter. The Olympics and Watervliets were the two other contestants. We led at the start and lost the race by the too gentlemanly conduct of our bow, Eldredge, who in order to save a foul with the Olympics, bent on jockeying as was subsequently shown, veered badly twice to the N. Y. side and thus placed our boat on the flats. The Olympics won by % sec., Columbia second. At one time two lengths of clear water separated us from the Olympics and if the race had been 20 yds. farther victory undoubtedly would have been ours. Tim...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CORRESPONDENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1879

CORRESPONDENCE. To the Editors of THE SPECTATOR : IN 1858 the Alumni Association of Columbia College decided to offer a prize of $5O to the most deserving student of the graduate class. This prize is one of the most honorable that can be received, being decided both by popularity and by constant application. The Alumni also regard it as an important one, for in those years when their funds were very short, it was always decided that this prize should not fail or be withdrawn under any consideration. The idea was to draw the undergraduates and the Alumni closer together, and to show them that the Association took an active interest in her Alma Mater's students. In order, however, to keep this from becoming a mere case of popularity or combination election, the provision was put in that the Faculty should nominate three students, from which the class should name one. In other words, the class was not to name the most deserving man of the class , but the most deserving man of the three...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
HINTS from '82 [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1879

HINTS from '82

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
In Memoriam. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1879

In Memoriam. THE friends of our senior Professor, Dr. Drisler, were shocked on reading in the morning papers of June 13th, the following sad notice : DRISLER. — Suddenly, on Wednesday night, at her residence 48 West 46th st., ELIZABETH S., wife of Henry Drisler, and daughter of the late Jacob D. and Sarah Meseir Stagg. Funeral services at Trinity Church, on Saturday morning the 14th inst., at 11 o'clock. Friends are kindly requested not to send flowers. ON Saturday, old Trinity was filled with sorrowing friends. Many of the students, who were yet in town, were present, feeling deeply for their Instructor. We can but express our heartfelt sympathy.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
ABOUT COLLEGE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1879

ABOUT COLLEGE. I\T INETY-EIGHT candidates for eighty-three. SEVENTY-NINE has only one Sp. Gr. THE new buildings will be ready for occupancy in September. THREE of the four prizes in German, won by members of Eighty-one. CONSIDERABLE money lost on the Fours in the Harlem Regatta. SEVENTY-NINE has all but a few dollars subscribed for the class Baby-cup. THREE THOUSAND, six hundred and fifty dollars distributed in prizes at commencement. HALLOCK, '79, winner of the Science Fellowship, intends studying Physics in Germany. W. B. PARSONS, JR. and Ferd. Sands, of' 79, will enter the second year class in the School of Mines next Autumn. THE building of the boiler house, with the heating apparatus, near the President's house, will necessitate the loss of several trees. LET every Columbia man be at Philadelphia to cheer for our four. They have a hard race before them to cross the finish line first. WE do not lose a boating man of any account either this year or next, as the two '79 oarsmen ar...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
School of Mines. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1879

School of Mines. THE mining engineers of 'BO are at Houghton, on the south shore of Lake Superior, under Prof. Monroe. TEN more men at the entrance examination this year than last, and in all probability there will be a corresponding increase in the fall. A few years more, and unless the other scientific schools of the country brace up very considerably, Columbia will lead. GROUND has been broken for the new boiler house, and by the autumn its walls will be doing their share towards shutting out the light from the laboratories. The boilers will supply steam for the new building as well as the School of Mines, the pipes to the former being conducted through a tunnel. THE School of Mines speeches at Commencement, as usual, received rather more attention than the others. That is not a particularly high compliment, but the applause was a tribute to the sensible subjects which the orators chose. Subjects which they could handle after their own manner and which the average audience can un...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE COLLEGE WORLD. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1879

THE COLLEGE WORLD. Harvard: — The following extract from a letter of a Harvard undergraduate seems to us the most suitable to this particular division. " What agitates us most at present is the giving up the race and naturally enough 'B2 is terribly disappointed although nobody blames Columbia in the least. Our foot-ball and base-ball ('B2's) teams have done absolutely nothing and everyone was looking forward to the race as the only way of retrieving lost prestige. The members of the crew are particularly disappointed for they looked forward to a pretty nearly ' cold thing ' on account of Columbia's repeated misfortunes, and moreover, notwithstanding the complaints in the papers, they had done some good solid work and were in pretty fair form. The Yale-Har-vard race is also looked upon as quite a ' chilly ' affair although it is reported that Yale has an unusually fine crew this year. It is surprising how many bicycles are owned by college students. A club has been formed with the i...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
OUR EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1879

OUR EXCHANGES. IT occurred to some of our Board not long ago that a book of clippings from our Exchanges would be very interesting, as it would show us whether our paper had improved or deteriorated. Unfortunately as it seemed then, or rather fortunately, as it turned out, we could have only one set, and even that could only be obtained by mutilating papers we desired to keep free from injury. This has resulted-in one or two of the Board subscribing personally to have a limited number of copies of these clippings printed in pamphlet form, and this plan we would recommend to those papers that can afford the expenditure, as it is productive of much personal good. These books could also be employed as advertising circulars. IN our final number for the collegiate year we had hoped to devote a large space to " Our Exchanges," but must content ourselves with mentioning a few. For general excellence, we like The Crimson. As our friend of the S. O. L. A. remarks, it is Harvard throughout, i...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SHAVINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1879

SHAVINGS. A FAIR and innocent child of co-education asked a gallant senior for the loan of his pony on logic, but was answered tenderly, that the animal couldn't bear a side-saddle.— Ex. STUDENT. —" Can we come into chapel if we arrive after the bell has stopped ringing?" Prof.—"No; never." Student. —"What, never?" Prof, —{slightly embarrassed ) "Well—yes—perhaps so—but almost never; unless circumstances arise , which alter cases. Of course there might be a unique case." Williams Athenceum. THE mother of a Harvard student, disgusted with the fewness of his letters home, had a package of cards printed : I AM WELL. \Sign here\ These she sent with a request to sign and mail occasionally in stamped envelopes provided.— Rochester Campus. The dairy-maid pensively milked the goat, And, pouting, she paused to mutter, "I wish you brute, you would turn to milk." And the animal turned to butt her. FRESH. —(Anxious about his rank) to Prof, of Mathematics.' —" What will be my rank for the term ?...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 26 June 1879

The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. IV. No. IX. NEW YORK, JUNE 26th, 1879. SUPPLEMENT. Board of Editors, 1879-1880. WILLIAM S. SLOAN, 'Bl, Managing Editor. WILLIAM F. MORGAN, 'SO, Business Editor. WILLIAM H. TAYLOR, 'BO. WILLIAM B. MCVICKAR, 'BO. J. DUANE LIVINGSTON, 'BO. REGINALD H. SAYRE, 'Bl. GEORGE H. TAYLOR, 'Bl. WILLIAM K. OTIS, 'B2. C. D. STARR, 'Bl, S. of M. A. GERALD HULL, 'B2, S. of M. CHARLES E. CALDWELL, B. A., S. of L. TERMS. Per annum, (18 numbers.) in advance, - $2.00. Single copies, - - - - - - 1 S cts - Remittances by mail should be addressed to HENRY G. PAINE, Treasurer, No. 26 West 30th Street, N. Y. Exchanges, contributions, and all other communications should be addressed to THE COLUMBIA SPECTATOR, Columbia College, N. Y. Students and graduates of the various_departments of Columbia are requested to contribute articles, verses, letters, and information.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
PARTIAL LIST OF EIGHTY-THREE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 26 June 1879

PARTIAL LIST OF EIGHTY-THREE. THE following list of thirty names comprises the full number of those admitted without conditions to the freshman class. The answers, to the Examination Papers, have been remarkably good, and the class will undoubtedly prove to be the largest class that has entered. The oldest applicant is twenty-one years old, against twenty-six of last year, and the youngest fourteen, against the same age in eighty-two. We also learn from the list that some have signed as having 14X I AA> years to their credit, and one says he is " going on 17." Interesting, is it not? The average number of years is 17 and a small fraction. G. H. Barnes, D. P. Morgan, Jr., L. J. Boury, W. H. Pott, H. P. Case, A. Rosenberg, J. E. de Ruyter, A. L. Seligman, A. Gudeman, J. H. Schmelzel, O. K. Hand, E. B. Schmitt, E. Herzog, S. A. Smith, E. L. Heydecker, A. F. Stevens, A. Hulshizer, G. Thomson, A. V. W. Jackson, G. G. Van Blarcom, A. L. Lesher, F. B. White, E. J. Levey, N. R. W...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CRICKET. COLUMBIA vs. SECOND ELEVEN OF ST. GEORGE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 26 June 1879

CRICKET. COLUMBIA vs. SECOND ELEVEN OF ST. GEORGE. THE Columbia College Cricket Club, which has been organized this Spring through the exertions of G. H. Clarke, School of Law, and W. F. Morgan of the College, played its second match on Saturday, June 7th, at Hoboken, against the Second Eleven of the St. George's Cricket Club. Although our Eleven was short the services of several of our good men, we managed to win by 8 runs, as may be seen by the appended schedule. COLUMBIA. First Inning. Second Inning. G. Hyde Clarke, Hit wicket, Giles, Jr 9 c. Giles, b. Richardson 18 J. P. Conover, b. Richardson 14 b. Richardson 14 W. F. Morgan, b. Richard--son 1 b. Richardson....: 8 O. De Forest, b. Giles, Jr. 4 b. b. w. Ropes : 4 C. W. Barnes, b. Richardson 1 b. Ropes o J. V. A. Weaver, b. Richardson o b. Richardson 3 F. B. Torrey, b. Giles, Jr. 1 Not out 14 A. S. Emmet, not out o c. Harrison, b. Giles 1 Byes, 5: Leg Byes, 1; D. P. Morgan, b. Ropes.. . 1 Wides, 5.... 11 E. N. Wright (subs.) b. R...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
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