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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

The Indian Advocate; Devoted to the Interests of Indian Missions. Vol. IX. OCTOBER, 1897. No. 4. Among the Kiowas, Commanches and Apaches Their Social Life and Relations. Man, in whatever position he may be found, whother in savage, barbar ous or civilized nations, is pre-eminently a social being. He finds that associated action gives power and leads to success where individual exertion would be expended for naught. Hence he gathers into clans, tribes or nations, according to the degrees of civilization or associative power attained. Every clan, tribe or nation having its own ends in view, whatever jealousies may exist towards others, must of necessity act in concert in all important matters relating to other tribes or nations. The Indian is no exception to this rule. However savage he may appear to others, among his own people he is a man. The same1 qualities, to a very great extent, which constitute a man with us, make a man with the Indian. He stands in the estimation of his peo ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

HP(PHPj5553flp55HBK33B5IB5 i v?r jyul 98 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. much from lodge to lodge. It not in frequently occurs that the people of several lodges eat together. They go to one to eat meat, to anothor for bread and coffee, and so around. No one in camp is deficient in food while another has it. The manner of partaking is worthy, perhaps, of description." The company is seated, or squatted, rather, around on a matting that forms the beds at night, their feet gathered under them. Short boards or thick pieces of hide are placed before each one, the meat is taken out of the kettle by the fingers of the woman who officiates as cook, and apportioned to each one and placed before him; bread is distributed, and cups for the coffee furnished to each. The party is some time in par taking of the meal, which is enlivened by much conversation, amusing tales and laughter, while the meat is torn to pieces by the teeth and fingers, some times with the assistance of a knife. On the arrival of a vi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

IIIIIHMH IfPWH JWJ.fl fWWJff-v" THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 99 LgMMMMMI with his " medicine," and passes it on; each in turn takes the pipe until it reaches the one nearest the entrance of the lodge, when it returns, passes the medicine man to the extreme right, whence it commences another round. Plans for the next day are agreed upon, and other matters relating to the tribe are talked over while the pipe is circu lating. Social conversation, tales, etc., are in order between the times of smok ing, or after each pipeful has been ex hausted. Thus the evening is spent with the old men. In the morning an old man walks out in front of his lodge, and in deep, stentorian tones announces the plans for the day as agreed upon the evening before. In the matter of dress, though ap parently cumberous and disgusting to civilized eyes, it is pretty well adapted to their mode of life. Their out-of-door life is chiefly spent on horseback, and while the mornings and evenings are cool, the middle of the day...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

-"wgpmqipMMW " ' y'WBgsa r 100 THU INDIAN ADVOCATE. degenerate days. Traditions are also told over to the young by night, some tribes refusing to tell them in the day time. The young men and warriors have many games of chance which they play, accompanied by singing and sometimes drumming; these are often continued throughout the entire night. Indeed, in large camps of from ono hundred to two hundred lodges, seldom a night passes without hearing the sound of the drum, continued until long after sunrise. The girls and young women are not without sports, different it is true from those of the young men, but equally exhilarating. The children of both sexes have their evening dancing fires, where they exercise until late in the evening. Night, indeed, is the season for mirth, revelry and voluptuous en joyment in an Indian Camp, and there is usually more noise then than in the day time. Day sports with the men consist of horse-racing, and exercising with the bows and arrows; with the wome...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

jfppfw , 9fr1' 7.. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 101 ponies he possesses, and finally gives him an invitation to the lodge. If a favorable impression has been made he is met at the entrance of the lodge by the object of his love, who takes his horse, unsaddles it and lariats it out, while ho is invited into the lodge by the father or brother. If she is not duly impressed with a sense of his worth and tender affection, she is not seen. Should the course of love run smooth, eventually, perhaps not for weeks, a contract is made; her value is extolled by her mother, while her father, anxious to drive as good a bar gain as possible, fixes her price in pon ies, blankets, or other articles of value. Terms agreed upon with the parents, he at length offers to give her all the ponies she wishes, and she names two, four, six or eight, as she happens to fancy; he promises to buy calico, beads, paint, etc., for her whenever she wants them, and she finally becomes his wife without other ceremony, and they...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

;nrfi mmmrmvm HI llll -?,; ??& 102 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. titude of good and evil spirits, each class having a great chief, by whom they are controlled. These spirits rule the affairs and destinies of men. The great good spirit brings about all that is good, or beneficial to men, as health, peace, plenty and happiness, through the medium of inferior good spirits. All good and useful animals were made by him for their use, while such animals as the panther, venomous serpents and reptiles were made for,, the injury of men by the bad spirits. The flesh of such animals is not fit for food, hence is proscribed by their " medicine." All the evils to which they are subject, as sickness, war, hunger and distress, are brought upon them through the influ ence of evil spirits. Hence their sys tem of religion involves no particular duties further than that the aid of the Good Spirit is to be invoked, and the wrath and enmity of the evil must be appeased. They believe in a future existence, bu...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

0$&mmiwfi jpBgpi wimw r-r THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 103 " SBKHHsBHSKWii c vr. must hoed the warning. As it was not my design to make a treatise of their superstitions, perhaps what lias been written in this respect will be sufficient to render intelligible their ideas of re ligion, and what is meant by the use of the word " medicine." The Indian has been described as be ing grave and brave, possessing a lofty independence of character, and a stoi cal insensibility of pain. Without here speaking of the other qualities of his nature, the Indians of the Southwest, while they may be grave in important councils, are sociable, lively, and even jovial in conversation, and as such en joy a joke as much any class of people provided it does not cut their pride too closely, The following anecdotes, illustrative of the peculiar humorous ness of their character, will prove my assertion. An Indian of the Comanche reserva tion having had a field made, raised some corn to sell. He accordingly went t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

"Ptn" 5rv ytjgfNpiM "w y iij vpTTTiify''ifywai! yy ' vw 104 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. SELF-CONTROL. Self-control stands in the front ranks of the "respectable" virtues. Society demands it, and he who lacks it finds place in Society's black books, and reads its estimate of himself in Society's black looks. Impulse must prompt to naught, not even to a brave deed. Every word must be pondered; each act weighed beforehand in its every bearing. An agonizing cry for help must be responded to only after philos ophical consideration, even though the delay thrust the sufferer beyond help's bounds; this follows. About self-control much nonsense has been, and is said and written; and as with the world at large, nonsense wields very considerable sway, and it is easy to understand why it should have accomplished something for self control. No one, on a moment's thought, will claim that there is any thing dogmatic in the statement that the nonsense urged on behalf of self control has caused masses of p...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

vjwpNwjjJfllPP 1 1 .''r MHTWflT'Wlf THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 105 TjEje Indiarj jidVocatc Is a Quarterly Review, published by the Benedictine Fathers of the Indian Ten, to plead the cause of the last remnants of Indian tribes, and to give a history of their progress toward civilization. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of each tribe; their progress in education and religion; their occupa tions, industries, schools, etc., etc. Also, a history of our mis sions, statistics, and other interesting matter that can not be found in any other publication. The proceeds of this Review will be used for educating and converting the Indians of the Territory. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, Sacred Heart 1. O , Okla. Ter. ArpnoVED UY Rioht Rev. TIIEO. MEERSCHAERT, Vicxn ArosTouc of Oklahoma and Indian Teiuutoky. A Quarterly Roview, ontorod at tlio Sacrod Heart Post Oifico in Oklahoma Territory, as second-class matter. Subscriptions SO Vents per Yeur. Single Copies 10 Cents, OCTOBER, 1897. Edit...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

j'wv.'Ufvu-T- -ywy -? 106 THU INDIAN ADVOCATE. z&r'? Minds of moderate calibre ordinarily condemn everything which is beyond their range. We should pray each day for our dead friends, but during the month of November we should pray in general for all the dead who are in purgatory, for there are many who die without friends, without anyone to pray for them, and "their Mother, the Church, takes the place of all there." A clergyman went to his treasurer for his salary. " Salary," cried the treasurer in pious horror, "Salary, why I thought you worked for souls." "And so I do," replied the minister, "but I cannot eat souls. And if I could, it would take a good many souls the size of yours to make a dish." A person who has nothing to do drifts rapidly away from God. To sit down into a chair without an object, is to jump into a thicket of temptations. A vacant hour it? always the devil's hour. When time hangs heavy the whips of the spirit flap painfully and slow. Then it is that a book...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

Tprr JSjJ"1-""' l l' f"Vr'vm "vrrv THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 107 y. 4& Our system of bookkeeping as re gards our account with Almighty God seems to be very peculiar. The Father gave us His only-begotten Son, the Son gave uo the last drop of His Blood; and we give Them in return a sleepy half hour on Sunday morning, and we think the ledger is balanced! The Indians of the so-called five civilized tribes, are fighting against the abolition of tribal governments, yet by degrees their authority is undermined. Eight years ago the attack began, when the United States established a court at Muscogee. Then came the enlarge ment of the court, with additional pow ers, and soon, (January '98) the tribes will have no court at all. There is now absolutely nothing left of the tribal government but the name. "A good Indian is a dead Indian," has become proverbial. The savagery of white Americans has aroused the feelings of revenge among the Cheyenne Indians, who have gone on the war path, preferring...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

T$WWi 108 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. hf ii. .jnyifcn i-"wf mtufmff0-gfU"fl' f WT1 Says the Catholic Review: When the Protestants thought that Grant's ' peace policy" was to benefitthem, all the chief sects among them approved of it and took part in it; but as soon as time proved that their missions were sterile, that the Indians preferred the Catholic " black gowns " to their preachers; and that the Catholics were taking in tht whole field, and getting control of the expenditure of the bulk of the money set aside by the government for Indian educational purposes, then they dis covered that the constitution, funda mental American 'principles, the sepa ration of Church and State, etc., etc., all prohibited sectarian appropriations that is, appropriations for religious purposes, or moneys expended un der denominational care. Then they stormed Congress, petitioned, threat ened, and finally Ku-Kluxed that body to cut off these " sectarian appropria tions." They are also agitating, through mali...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 109 0 S Rev. Fr. Hippolyto Topet, 0. S. B., has also erected a convent for the six Benedictine Sisters who volunteered to conduct his schools in Lehigh and Coal gate, I. T. May the good sisters instill in the minds of their pupils and imbue the hearts of them with the true Bene dictine spirit, for there can be no doubt that in Benedictine " bringing-up " there is something in the nature of a moral tonic. Above Benedictine sis tors came from St. Scholastica's Con vent, Shoal Creek, Arkansas. The Oriental tale of the husband and wife who could not agree whose duty it was to shut the door, while in the mean time their dwelling was being looted by thieves, and they themselves were being made the laughing stock of the despoilers, reflects the condition of many Christians. The precipitation of unbelief grows apace, while Christians wrangle openly, or secretly hate one another. Fraternity demands not that we deny abstract rights, but that we waive them, and Christian f...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

110 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. August 24 four young ladies received the white veil at St. Mary's Convent, Sacred Heart, Oklahoma. Everyman ought to endeavor to shield others from the evils he has experi enced himself. Again the Advocate is under great obligation to Messrs. Shea and Cronin, Jno. Crosson, Isidor Gross, Jos. Bill, and Rev. Fr. H. Zimmer, for favors re ceived. Rev. Fr. William Ketcham has erect ed, through the munificence of Mother Drexel, a school and convent at Ant lers, Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory. Said buildings were solemnly blessed on Sunday, August 29. Thy Burden. To every one on earth God gives a burden, to be carried down The road that lies between the cross and crown ; No lot is wholly free ; He giveth one to thee. Some carry it aloft, Open and visible to any eyes ; And all may see its weight and form and size ; Some hide it in their breast And deem it thus unguessed. Thy burden is God's gift, And it will make the bearer calm and strong ; Yet, lest it press too...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Ill V above all, the demon of intemporence, hold their sway from whence the little child goes forth at midnight, pleading "Father, clear father, come home!" and oftimos pleads in vain. Alas, that such should exist, even in our very midst, making the sacred name of home a mockery and a scorn! Let us turn from the dark page, and glance through those glowing windows upon a group assembled around the cheerful hearth, the light from the blazing fires, illuminating each happy face, as the ripples of childhood's laughter ring out with echo to some merry tale or sportive jest. Truly that is a home for love! But in the fullness of their deep joy, may ther reflect upon the desolate, the uncared-for, the pilgrim in life's lonely waste. Mocked by the memories of a home, And homeless everywhere ! No, not everywhere, for there is another, brighter and fairer than that on earth. And there's no night in the home-laud, But aye the fadeless morn ! And they who patiently and praye...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

M WWW'TWWVW ' ' 'w" ' " " '?i'yvyoi'jr'J-7VBg"'Tr 112 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. THE LAST OF THE YUKIAHS. At the time of the Spanish conquest of California, the Indian population of the territory was known to be very large. In Northern California alone it is estimated that over fifty thousand aborigines roamed in undisturbed se curity all over this fertile land. With the advent of the conquerors the In dians began to decline in numbers, owing to the cruel treatment of the Spaniards, and the introduction of hitherto unknown diseases, which were very fatal to them, so that when the State came into the possession of the Americans not one-half as many In dians remained in the country as ex isted a century before. The destruction of the tribes pro gressed more rapidly even under Ameri can domination than under the Span iards. The fatal vice of drink became more general among them, and they succumbed to the new civilization. When the settlers of the country dis covered how well the northern hal...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

J5".. s ' THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 113 $ m fcS AUtlf-J-L E; a. i ' curved at the top and covered with straw. These people have some virtues, hos pitality, for instance. The women make baskets, which are sometimes ar tistic, being ornamented with different colored straw, woven in angular figures, and with feathers from gaily colored birds. Uncle Sam (in his paternal so licitude, no doubt) is doing all in his power to protect these Indians from their most dangerous enemy, rum, but with indifferent success. Heavy pen alties are laid upon the trader who sup plies them, but an Indian will barter everything he ha3 for a bottle of whiskey, and generally finds some un scrupulous dealer to supply him. To this cause, and the diseases inci dental to civilization, the decimation of this remnant of the old Yukiah Indians may be ascribed Every year shows their number decreased, and a genera tion hence will find the last of the tribp awaiting his final call. E. BROWN. A TRUE MUSICIAN. Will you hear to...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

114 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ft m it t are called and set apart for holiness, it would seem, from some points of view, to be those who render to us the music of the Church. What a life, a great, though worldly, musician must lead ! That subtle faculty, whereby he hears strains that he can never set to instru ment, spiritual sounds that are beyond mechanical interpretation, "echo an swering echo, dying, dying, dying," from the fanciful horns of elf-land to the mystic music of the spheres, lifts him into a realm apart, where artists, poets and sculptors are akin to him, and soul talks with soul. But the musician of the Catholic Church! More than five long centuries since, the old writer, Richard Rolle, in his treatise on the adhesion or indwell ing of God with the soul of man, says that our Lord comforts a soul by angels1 songs. " But what that song is may not be described by bodily likeness, for it is spiritual and above all manner of imagination and man's reason. It may be perceived and...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

pMr, "' ffr-P- mmmmmmmmm THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 115 MISS THERMO-METER. I know of a restless young lass, Who lives in a house made of glaps, And from her location, Marks each variation Of hot and cold waves as they pass. When heat is announced she will spring To quickly make note of the thing. "lis very surprising That simply by rising So true a report she can bring To self-elevation inclined, She has such a volatile mind That in every season A suitable reason For frequent depression she'll find. Her temper mercurial thus Creates everywhere such a fuss That in conversation Aflairs of the nation Are slighted this maid to discuss. THE INDIAN "GHOST DANCES' The dance commonly begins about the middle of the afternoon, or later, after sundown. When it begins in the afternoon there is always an intermis sion of an hour or two for supper. The announcement is made by the criers, old men who assume this office appar ently by tacit understanding, who go about the camp shouting in a loud voice to...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1897

itgtin vmjwfjgfmmmin u. i','yiy 'ipy '-v' 'Wff 116 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. mmr-rnmmw$p-xm ,m"" from the neighborhood of the circle lest they should run against any of those who have fallen into a trance and thus awaken them. The dancers them selves are careful not to disturb the trance subjects while their souls are in the spirit world. Full Indian dress is worn, with buckskin, paint and feath ers, but among the Sioux the women dis carded the belts ornamented with disks of German silver because the metal had come from the white man. Among the southern tribes, on the contrary, hats were sometimes worn in the dunce, al though this was not considered in strict accordance with the doctrine. No drum, rattle or other musical in strument is used in the dance, except ing sometimes by an individual dancer in imitation of a trance vision. In this respect particularly, the Ghost dance differs from every other Indian dance. Neither are any fires ever built within the circle, so far as known, with ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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