ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 1,232 items from Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
1,232 results
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 1 March 1893

VOIV. KO. 0.1 $1.00 A TSA&f TI CffflWl Trampled Under loot by Be- publican Supreme Court Justices. Judge Poster's Strong Argumsnt and Striking Citations Ars Wasted on Partisan Ears and Preju diced Hinds. The legal proceedings brought in two courts to determine which was the law ful house of representatives will form no small part of the history of the late con test. There will come a time when a knowledge of these proceedings will be valuable to every voter in the state. The injunction case of the state, by re lation of B. M. Curtis, county attorney, ei. Van B. Prather, state auditor, and W. H. Biddle, state treasurer, in the district court of Shawnee county, was heard on .February-17, and on the 18th Judge Hazen rendered a long opinion, giving as his decision that the temporary injunc tion must be allowed for the reason that the Dunsmore house was not the legal house of representatives, and that the appropriation act in question had not been legally passed, This decision was no...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 1 March 1893

THUS iUDVOOATffi IS 1I0UEY WEALTH? Esveral Phases of the Money Question. Editor Advocatx: In your issue of . February 8 1 have read with much in tsreat a very excellent article under the above heading, by Brother R. T, Sned iker, of Hartford, Kas. The beat point in it is his ehowjng the great importance of the land question, near the- close of the article. But, earlier in the article, aresom statements liable to mislead readers who have not thought bo deeply and radically on these questions as he has. For example, he uses "prices" and "values" as synonymous terms, and seems to assume that they are the same as monetary values. He then assumes that the amount of money floating in a coun try cuts very little figure as to prices or values. Let us be more definite. ' Value is a general term with several meanings; and price, being, perhaps, less general, has more than one meaning, or shade of v meaning. Some articles have three values. Many articles have two, and still others have one; an...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 1 March 1893

0 predicted that it would never be fully enforced. Mr. Cobbett said: "Before this bill can be carried into complete execution a million of persons at least must die of hunger; that it never would be completely carried out; and that, if it were bo, he would suffer Castle resgh to broil him alive, while Sidmouth stirred the coals and Canning stood by to make a jest of his groans." Even as late as 1830, the time for broiling Cobbett had not yet arrived. Expedients were still being devised to enable the bank to resume. It was ar ranged, ultimately, that a portion of the currency should rest on its legal tender quality, amounting to about sixteen mil lions sterling, and the rest should be re deemed in coin. So the broiling time of Cobbett never came, but the "million people'.1 and more were duly starved in t.ha nt.fAmnf tn rAAftH flnflfiifl navmants. it is frequently asked, how will an in crease of money and rising prices beae- fit labor? Invthe first place plenty of money, causing risin...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 1 March 1893

1 , THE ADVOCATE. AXJD TOPEKA TBIBUNE. N. li. P. A. PUBLISHIO 1VIBT WlDHXSDAY BT THE ADVOCATE PUBLISHIXB COMPANY. Boomi 43 and 19 Knox Building, TOPEKA, - . - KANSAS. $1.00 PER YEAIt. ADVERTISING BATES. For single Insertion : Display matter, 20 cents per line, 14 lines to the Inch. Reading notice, 40 oents per line. Discount (or long-ume coo tracts. Entered at fee postofflceat Topeka, Kansas, as second class matter. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 1803. mm Was it simply the exposure of the worthlessness of ex-Treasurer Stover's official bond that made all the repub lican papers so suddenly quit howl ing about Biddle's bond? It is not fair to-say that there is no loyalty among the etate militia. There is plenty of it, but it received little encouragement from the higher officers during the late unpleasant ness. The recently whipped John L. Sullivan and the republican party in Kansas are very much alike. Neither of them knows enough to lay down and be quiet long enough to gain sympathy after bein...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 1 March 1893

5 Partisan Prejudice a Patent Pactoi in the Becent Difficulties. The situation in the state of Kansas to day is the fruit of republican legisla tion. There never was in the history of the United States a case where it was so thoroughly demonstrated that a long line of partisan education and consecu tive administrations of one party are liable to subvert the very means of the people's protection into a party mechine, wholly incapable of answering the call of duty if perchance the people should conclude to change the officers of the law. At the November election the people of Kansas concluded there was necessity of a change, and in exercising their con stitutional prerogative, elected Hon. L. D. Lewelling as their chief executive. Having serious apprehensions of difficulty during the late trouble, the governor re quested the sheriff of Shawnee county to assist him in preserving order. That re quest was not granted, and the people became alarmed at the threatening con dition of affairs...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 1 March 1893

0 . THE ikIDVOO-A.TE3. WAFT A BAUEOAD 8EIATGB. The stalwarts met in Topeka again the other day. As the Advocate finds hundreds of new readers every week, it is possible some of them do not know what the stalwarts are, and it would probably be a good idea to ex plain. The stalwarts are to the poli tics of Kansas what the descendants of a very ancient race are ip the religions world. Politically speaking they have no home, no flag, no sa viour, no conscience, "no nothing." They pretend to be democrats, but having left their party during the last campaign, and tried to help the republicans out of a very bad hole, they became political wanderers on the face of the earth. Since that time they have done scarcely any thing but resolve, and they have got so they do that on the slightest provocation. When they are not re solving they are reorganizing. It takes a great deal of reorganizing to keep them in shape to resolve suc cessfully, and issue addresses to the people. It was the same old c...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 1 March 1893

THH3 jDVOOT23. 7 THE HK30UBI TEXT BOOK LAV. This article was promised for last week but owing to the space occupied by a renew of the lata political events, it was left out of last week's issue. Editob. TEXT BOOK LAW. A bill introduced into the Missouri legislature providing for the appointment by the governor of a school book com mission, to consist of four competent persons, together with the state superin tendent of schools, to select a uniform series of text books for use in the schools of the state, during a period of five years, became a law on the 21st of June, 1891. In August of the same year, the commis sion met and selected the text books. According to the law, after September 1, 1892, no school district in the state, ex cept those in which the cities of St Louis sad Kansas City are included, can use any other text books in reading, spelling, English grammar, arithmetic, geography, history, civil government, physiology and penmanship than those selected by these five men. ...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 1 March 1893

0 HI I (Continued from page 1.) initssphera It can only adjudicate CAsoa within its jurisdiction. There are three departments of gov eminent, equal, co-ordinate and eaah su preme within its sphere; and one of the most elementary doctrines of constitu tional law is, that to each of these de partments is committed the decision of that which properly pertains to itself. For the benefit of gentlemen who have fundamentals, I read from Cooley's Con stitutional Limitations (marginal page X39): We have before seen that we are to expect in every constitution an appor tionment of the powers of government. We shall always find certain duties im posed upon the several departments as well as upon specified officers in each; and we shall likewise discover that the constitution has sought to hedge about their action in several ways, with a view to the protection of individual rights, and the proper separation of duties; and wherever any one is called upon to per form a constitutional duty, or to d...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 1 March 1893

0 interpretation is, that every intendment Li allowed to those who assart the eon etitationality of an act of the legislature. Some courts say it must be ahown to be in conflict with the organio law beyond a reasonable doubt The supreme court of Indiana aays if there be a doubt, the act in question must be upheld, because ' to entertain a doubt is to decide in favor of the act Why does cot this rule apply in our case? While we have no legisla tive act to compare with the constitution, we have a legislative organization which gentlemen seek to disintegrate upon some constitutional ground, of -which heaven and they alone are cognizant But it cannot be done consistently with the law. The question is political it is cot judicial, and every court known to English and American jurisprudence has bo decided it Let me begin with the case of Luther w. Border, 7, How. U. S. The contro versy in that case grew out. of Dorr's re bellion. Rhode Island had been ad caitted into the union under her c...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 1 March 1893

10 . THE ADVOCATE. The Transportation Question Editor Advocate: To years bjjo, when the People's party, by its faithful labor in the transportation problem, die ftovftrftd that a bushel of wheat was hauled from Kansas City to St. Louis at the cost of only 3 cents a bushel, white from a point in Kansas situated as Lindaborg is to Kansas City (a less di3- tunce than from Kansas City to St. Liuis),it costs to haul a bushel of wheat 10 centa. In the argument upon such a condi tion, the committee of the hous9, by its kindly feelings and inclination to jus tioe, mada what I think a fatal mistake It took for granted that the company could not haul a bushel of wheat from Kansas City to St Louis for such a price as 3 cents, consequently there must exist something like a pool between the rail road and the speculator whereby part of the 10 cents paid in Kansas for like eer vice being paid by the Kansas producer was shared by the railroads east of Kan eas City to enhance the profit of the specu...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 1 March 1893

11 THE ADVOCATE. FOR FIRIOEIB OUST Thresher Bslts, Task Pumps ni Hisa, Hill, Elerctir and UicMnery Si!?;!i:$, w'Ht0 JOHNSTON-LEWIS SUPPLY CO., Manufacturer's Agents. 1223 Union Ave., Kansas City, Ho. IS ilOUEY WEALTH? ( Continued from page 3.) (or a controlling interest in it), and be comes master of the situation, "levying tribute at will on all our vast indus tries." There is ample evidence to prove that, at this moment, a controlling amount of the capitalization of our American railroads is held in the city of London, and that the freights and fares paid by Americans are fixed by a British directory. Such a statement is humili ating, but it is, nevertheless, true. I have now shown the nature and power of money, both for good and eviL The question next arises, How can we enjoy the good without suffering the evil? I reply, We muat nationalize the money. We most, as muoh as possible, keep it in the hands of the people and under their control. We must not per mit its issue by individ...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 1 March 1893

THUS jaDV"OOA.TID. (Continued from page 9.) whoever habitually and effectually exer cias3 the duties and authority of an cfflce Li a de facto officer, and his seta are valid as euch. We invoke the principle of these cases here. The Dunsmore house has been in the effectual exercise of every legislative rower since its organization. Granted that the Douglass house is euch de jure, yet until that is established the acts of the other are valid and binding. The de jure character of the Douglass house cannot be established by decisions of the court for the reasons given. It is not a question for the courts. The range of investigation and decision permitted in this collateral enquiry has been pointed out by my associates, and as my time has expired I must forbear, not only upoa that, but upon all other topics of argument in the cose. OPINION OF ASSOCIATE JUSTICE ALLEN The questions involved in this case are perhaps of greater importance than those which have ever been involved in any contr...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 1 March 1893

18 ttrti. haye roted in favor of the officers who re elected by the house to organize it. Whatever may be said with reference to organ ization of the Dnnsmore house, I am clearly of the opinion that it cannot be held that the Douglass house was, at the time this writ was issued, in fact in the discharge of the dutios of a house of representatives, and that it cannot be aid that Mr. Douglass was in fact in the posses sion of the office of speaker of the house. The consequences which must necessarily flow from the decision rendered by the majority of this court are serious in the extreme. The ap propriation bills for the maintenance of state government, the asylum, the penitentiary, the tther institutions for the unfortunate, must all fail for the time being. The effect of this de cision is not to bring order out of confusion. but anarchy. The opinion of a majority of this court, if carried out and accepted by the other departments of the government, must toppl down and destroy all th...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 1 March 1893

THE ADVOCATE. Shall Spreckles be limeied? Mr. Claua Spreckles, sometimes re forred to as the Hawaiian sugar king, is a man of much energy and thrift, but one who is not generally regarded as a model of honesty. It will be remembered that some half a score of years ago he managed, by getting the favor of the ruler of the Sandwich islands, to secure the control of almost the entire sugar praduct of the islands. Immediately afterward, the queen of the country, Queen Lilliuokalani, presumably by and with fhfl advice and consent of Mr. Spreckles, asked for and obtained treaty with this country by which the sugar produced there was to be admitted free of duty. At that time raw sugar from other daces, imported into the United States, was taxed from 3 to 3 cents a pound. Immediately after the ratification of this treaty Mr,. Spreckles found himself the possessor of a flourish ing and lucrative business, bringing sev- eral million pounds of sugar from Hawaii to the United States on a very ne...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 1 March 1893

THSI ADVOCATE. 15 WZQZn OAS AND GASOLINE ENUIN2 simplest ana mow ooonoirucM euglnae on earth. Fully GaaraiiteeJ. - A boy starts It, requires ochr a few minutes' attention a day. Gnarantoed oort of running 1 ot hram net IJ U Writ catalogue. AaarwB jyrswsi o jWfiHsr Gas Ett&l Wcm HAH3AS CITY MO MACHINES, fl Agents ThaSelf-HeatingWasherjte Complete Success at Last. , J FORTUNE A Washing Machine with gasoline aitacnment;neatsauu keeps water hot; does not slosh or steam, but rubs the dirt out. 4 cents worth of gasoline does a4' f washing. No tub, washboard?' or boiler needed. Wringers!' v86 $1.66 each. Address the m'f'r I . . X'. BENBOW, 814-16 N. 18th st.,8t. Louis.' Send for Term , . ;1L MACHINE. Vtfjll pull an ordinary t f tws Acres st s ttttlaf . A man, s bar and a none aaa opr aw It. Mo heavy Castas or rodt (o handle. Tht trap oa a tow aorat th flnl year will par for the Maahin. Send powal titi tar Illaitrated Catalofso, finnc price, term., teitimoniali, ale foil InlbrmaUoB coao...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 1 March 1893

T23CHJ jajDVOOilTB. 10 FIE. PPr J- 2B?E2FD' mm nan ay.; S 3 3 U I J Red, White, Alfalfa and Aleike Clovers. . . 3 Ltis W Timothy, Bine Orchard Graaa, Red Vf f0 niTV Mfl fai ik T Tfefl Cape See(L yjjioiio bill; LJUi m 1 fllliK 3 i WIS MAKE A SPECIALTY OP CLOVERS, TIMOTHY, GRASS SEED AND GARDEN SEED. A. J. GILLESPIE & CO., I T.2.GrxLxsna. J.F.Gnxssris. Commission Morohants, ISancon Oity OtooJt TiTorda. Liberal advances made to parties feeding stock. Cdrrespondenfe solicited. Make a specialty of buying feeding cattle on orders. Ilia Advocatx seat to our cuitomars fr&e. Telephone No. 1223, 1425-1428 St. Louis Avsw, KANSAS CITY, MO. TRUI.1BULI STREAH & UlLEil SEED CO. SEED COM! "1StuKwK!S premiums at state and national shows than any other corn in Ne braska. $1 par bu. ; lack" 29o each. Write for circulars. Addres R. HOGUE, C8ETE, NEB We have in stock a complete line of Field. Grata and Garden Seed. Opj 212-214 East Sixth 8b, TOPXKA, ElS. Ctn nnnfl For SUS per bushel-Early la...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 8 March 1893

AND TOPEKA TRIBUNE. VOI V. NO. 10. $1.00 A YJEAli. f TOPEKA, KANSAS, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 8, 1893. i omoiix PAPER OP TUB 1 PEOPUS'S PAIITY OP KANSAS. THE LEGISLATURE. TUB HOUSE. The lower branch of the legislature is not what it used to be. It is republican, by virtue of a railroad court and a dis position on the part of the Populists to obey the mandates of that court. After due consideration of the matter, the Dunsmore house, on February 28, formulated and sent to the senate a manifesto reciting tbe facts regarding the organization of the two houses and the judicial outrage which was to dis solve the legal body, alao a protest which was as follows: The situation which presents itself to the members of the Dunsmore house is this: Whether in the good name of the state, and the interests of the people, they will, in order to avoid a clash of arms, and a contest between themselves and armed forces brought here by rail road corporations composed of Pinkerton detectives, thugs and deputy sh...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 8 March 1893

THE! ADVOCATE. HORTON'S OPINION. How tio Chief Justice Eased His Con scienceThe Essential Points of His Opinion in the Gnnn Habeas Corpus Case. "The court ia under obligation! to tha able counsel in presenting the case we (art oal)d -to pass on this morning, both in the .. their able arguments, and also for "tii research of tha au thorities upon the questions involved. Yesterday the members of the court con sumed nearly the entire day in compar ing opinions, and discussing, bo far aa time would permit, all the material ques tions in the case. This morning I tome here to present my own views, and shall now do so on the matters presented, and will, at the conclusion, state the opin ions of the other members of the court. "The liberty of a citizen is in contro versy. But the statute of this state pro vides that no court or judge shall inquire into the legality of any judgment or proce-s whereby a party ia in custody, or discharge him, when the term of com mitment has not expired in the...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 8 March 1893

THE DVOO-k-TlE. ntement; bat when Secretary Osborne withdrew, another roll was produoed, a roll which everybody admits was an identical copy of his roll; the House or ganize, and when organized, proceeded to call that roll. Wby is not one thing substantially the same as another? I hare said that Mr. Douglass and the other officers received more than a ma jority of the duly certified members of the House. The speaker of the House, kaown as the Duns more House, received no votes from the sixty-four members. There does not seem to be any reason able oonteution about that. How many Mr. Dunsmors did receive it is im possible to tell because it was viva voce vote. Now, after there was a temporary organization of the Douglass House, Joseph Rosenthal of Haskell county was voted in as a member in the place of A. W. Stubbe. On January 12, Jose oh Rosenthal, Stephen Meagher and T G. Chamber! appeared in the Douglass Ilouse, filed their oaths of office and recognized thi Douglass House as the l...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 8 March 1893

THE iVIDVOOA.TB. V new. AM) TOPEKA TRIBUNE. N. Xfc. P. A.. PUBUSHW) EVHHT WED5I8DAY BY -THE ADVOCATE PUBLISHING COMPANY. - Booms 43 and 45 Knox Building, TOPEKA, - KANSAS. $1.00 PER YEAR. ADVERTISING RATES. For single Insertion : Display matter, 20 cents par line, 14 lines to the Inch. Beading notice, 40 cents per line. Discount for long-time con tracts. Entered at the pottofflce at Topeka, Kansas, as second class matter. WEDNESDAY,'' MARCH 8, 1893. While Anarchist Horton, in his oral opinion, talked about a great many things outside of the evidence in the case he was deciding, he did not say how a man who lives in Okla homa can be a member of the Kansas legislature. He probably forgot it. If a change in the railroad com missioner's office depends on the de cision of Chief Justice Horton, the newly elected members might as well resign and go home. No doubt a de cision of the case was reached before Anthony and Mitchell determined to stay in the office. Tee two democrats of the lower...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
x
Loading...
x
x