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Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 November 1897

bouquet he presented to the mayor, who was present, with an intimation that he would be doing the public a good service if he would immediately take steps to have it stamped oat. In regard to the wooly aphis Mr. J. C. Norton said: "I received some nursery stock two years ago and after plant ing I discovered that the aphis was afflicting the trees even down to the roots. I took the trees up and dipped them roots and all into a hot solution of the Bordeaux mixture. The aphis were removed, the trees replanted, grew and have not since been affected." The professor said that, while the plan might in that in stance have worked all right, he thought that to dip the roots of young trees with their fine tendrils into such a strong mixure was wrong and might do great damage. The prin ciple of dosing a young tree was as dangerous as it would be to give strong medicine intended for an adult to a babe, the result being disastrous, if not fatal. James Hart, of Christopher, said that it was pointe...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 November 1897

4 inches at the base. Placing a piece of this corky substance under a glass, could be readily seen, like the sands of the sea shore, this great army sapping the life blood from its vic tim. They laid waste thousands of the best vineyards of France, and that nation, fearing the total destruction of one of its greatest industries, offered 100,000 francs to any person who could introduce a method by which this pest might be successfully wiped out of existence. Not satisfied with the battles they had already won, or perhaps, wishing to add more laurels to their victories, like thieves in the night, by concealing their presence on the roots of the vines that had been purchased by California fruitgrowers, by so doing stole a march on tne vineyards of this, our sister state, and made their awful presence known by laying waste thousands of acres of this, the best vineyard state of the Union. In concluding my subject, I wish to state they are still spreading. I make this statement from the f...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 November 1897

gold medal to be offered by Wells & Richardson Co., manu facturers of improved butter color, whose meilts make it recognized as the standard butter color of the world. E. Suderdorf, the gentlemanly manager of the Western house of this firm, at Elgin, 111., writes the editor regarding the medal as follows: "This cut was made from a medal that we have been giving for several years and will be suitably engraved, read ing Washington State Dairy Convention in the center around the tub; '1897' will be at the bottom where '1895' now stands, and where '98%' is at present will be left open for engraving of the score of the winner's butter. This medal will be solid gold and of fine workmanship; it is not a pattern stamped out by machinery, but is made entirely by hand work. We shall send the medal to Mr. Woll in plenty of time to have It on exhibition at the convention. After the medal has been won all Mr. Woll will have to do will be to have the winner's name engraved on the back, and th...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 November 1897

6 EFFECT OF FOOD ON BUTTER. A well-known writer in Colman's Rural World says: "The effect of certain kinds of food upon butter is wortuy of con siderable attention in early winter, and anything tending to throw light upon this important subject should always be welcomed. All dairymen know, or should know, that frosty foods taint butter, while butter made from the cream and milk of cows that have not received any grain ration is wanting in flavor and taste. "The truth of the matter is, all foods given to cows have some effect upon the butter, and experiments during the past few years have been made to ascertain the true effect which is exerted by some of the most prominent foods upon thi3 product of the dairy. Why? Because it is not only the quality, but the quantity that is effected, and so serious is the question that, in truth, it cannot be neglected as one purely chimerical and of no concern to the dairyman. "My object here is to consider briefly some of the results achieved by t...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 November 1897

FALL PLOWINQ. Notwithstanding the investigation which has been be stowed on the question of the time of plowing and the interest which farmers have always taken in this problem and the general and constant discussion to which it has been sub jected, there still remains some doubt in tho average mind as to the real principles involved, and the present understand ing of the best practitioners in the matter. The results of the most careful investigation and the practice of leading farmers in all sections leave no doubt as to the fact of the desirability and advantage of plowing in the fall, or as soon after the removal of the last crop of the season as possible. I shall therefore not attempt to argue the question of when to plow, but rather endeavor to give the accepted reasons for the adoption of fall plowing as the practice on most well managed farms. The first and most important reason which may be urged for this practice is based on the fact that the air is the cheap est source of ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 November 1897

8 Ranch and Range. ISSUED EVERY THUKSDAY. In the interests of the Farmers, Horticulturists and Stockmen of Wash ington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Utah and British Columbia. Official organ of the Northwest Fruit Growers' Association, embracing Washington, Oregon, Idaho and British Columbia. Subscription (in advance) - $1.00 per year MILLER FREEMAN .... Editor Address all communications to 501-535 Pioneer block, Seattle, Wash. Branch office at North Yakima, Wash. For the convenience of the patrons of Ranch and Range residing in Eastern Washington, Oregon, Idaho and British Columbia we have established offices in Spokane, in the Hy potheek bank building with Alexander & Co., in charge. This firm is empowered with authority to secure advertising and subscriptions, engage correspondents and subscription rep resentatives, etc. The establishing of Spokane headquar ters will greatly enlarge the field and aid the growth of this publication. The Pacific Farmer, published at Portland, Or., h...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 November 1897

DE LAVAL "ALPHA" CREAM SEPARATORS^-— MJft. B^J",;?;,^ CREAMERY AND DAIRY MACHINERY AND SUPPLIES JP j , wnicat: the 1»0^? Wisoonsiti State Experiments Showi j^jf^*^ That many " Alpha De Laval " machines in everyday use are skimming as wonderfully EKfbsSr^ // close as .03; that the average is from .05 to .065; and that-but one machine out of those per- J»issi3« Nil sonally tested by Prof. Harrington was leaving more that .1. _ , r • ffjypjg^i V X /Pl\ That the ''-Keid-Danish " machines are leaving an average of three times as much fat in tSMgfllffSr £Ms£foJUA the skim milk as the "Alpha De Laval." . RggifpP That the " U. S." machines are leaving an average of three times as much tat in the ';£SF§b ~,. _XhTI&I# skim milk as the "Alpha De Laval." ■ . ji^lF \ JIV^ 'lhat the "Alexandra-Jumbo" machines are leaving an average of tour times as much /I3*it .>'C'^'S^^^ fat in the skim milk as the "Alpha De Laval." # #lm « c -%^mmm^ -'"' :-?^*8? That the "Sharpies Imperial Russian " mach...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 November 1897

IO SELECTINQ THE BEST. There is no better time than now to begin to cull out the inferior breeding stock. The sows and ewes will go into service and require increased care and feed to carry them profitably through the winter. If any of them have proven unprofitable mothers they can now be converted into pork or mutton at fair prices and better individuals brought in to take their places. Possibly if one will take a careful account of the receipts and expenses from the breeding pens he may find that losses have occurred from having a greater number of sows or ewes than could be properly cared for. Some sows may have lost pigs for want of shelter. This is a common source of loss. The loss of young pigs from the date of farrowing to wean ing is large at best, but in a wet, cold spring or fall the loss runs as high as 30 to 40 per cent. Half of this loss is avoid able if one has selected suitable sows for breeding and given suitable care to bring them up to the critical period in vigor ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 November 1897

Wool Growers, Dealers # Owners of Stieep AaZE PHY PROMPT CHSH FOR SHEjEjP PELTS and "W^OOIj WOOL SACKS FURNISHED IF DESIRED SEATTLE WOOLEN MILL CO. - - Seattle, Wash. outweigh practically important points, and their multiplica tion should always be discouraged. Every additional re quirement limits choice. It is vastly more difficult to secure a high standard of excellence with six such points than it is with three. Insistence on having animals "absolutely pure" in breed or family has done much to prevent general introduction of practically pure-bred stock. Convince a young farmer that an animal should not be used for breeding purposes because it has one sixty-fourth of an unfashionable cross, and he has large excuse for becoming disgusted. Admission to registry of good animals, with a reasonable number of crosses of pure blood, is an incentive to breeding up and for the best inter ests of improved stock breeding. Records showing excellence by trial or by awards at exhibi tions, have...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 November 1897

12 American Sheepbreeder: It looks very much like "killing the goose that lays the golden egg" to see the Western trunk railways stiffening freight tariffs on sheep to the extent of $25 per car over former rates that everybody and the good Lord thought were about as high as greed and avarice could well make them. Do these carriers of Western sheep really mean to make prohibitory rates against a large class of stockmen who had suffered for years to the very verge of ruin and who now, just as they begin to see their way out of the financial woods, have new foes to meet, scarcely less exacting, merciless and destructive than the professional tar iff reformers of '93? And why, pray, were the sheepmen singled out from among all other pastoralists for this out rageous discrimination? Several Dakota sheepmen have as sured us that if the new rate holds, it will mean the aban donment of the industry, by many flock owners, especially those who suffered heavy losses in the late winter storms. ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 November 1897

Throw Away the Old Spade IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIillll" AND BUY A "BANNER ROOT" CUTTER With Self-Feeding Device Cuts Long, Thin, Half-Kound Slices Capacity, 30 to 50 Bushels per Hour. circular + HARDWARE + 60.-* WHOLESALE AND RETAIL Agricultural Implements 821=823 Western Avenue Seattle THE ROAD QUESTION. In last week's Montesano Vidette appeared the followirg sound argument on the road question by A. C. St. George Kemp, a civil engineer of that place. The writer makes some particularly logical deductions as to the great import ance of having all work rightly planned and executed undar the supervision of competent parties: "Can anyone guess within $10,000 the amount of money that has been absolutely wasted on the alleged roads of this county? Impossible. Is there any evidence exsting of an intention to advisedly and deliberately work forward to a distinct goal, that goal being to put the producers in eas...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 November 1897

14 TflCOfllfl BUSINESS COMiEGE School of Shorthand and Normal Institute Business Department. Normal Department. Shorthand Department. Unexcelled in America. The best facilities. Thorough course in all branches required for Most rapid and legible system. Business practice from first day, Book-keeping, county and state certificates. Optional branches. Transcribing, Manifolding, etc. Correspondence, Business Forms, SEND FOR CATALOGUE TO B. J. TAIT. PRINCIPAL, TACOMA. WASH. JOHN B. HGEN — ■ — MANUFACTURER AND DEALER IN 3uttef 5 Eggs apd Cheese Sole Agents for the State of Washington for Ashton's Dairy Salt. The best Salt for Butter. Ship your Eggs to us. We pay Cash for Goods on Arrival. No Commission. 820 West Street, Seattle. 1702 Pacifiic Avenue, Tacoma THOMAS CARSTENS . ERNEST CARSTENS CARSTBNS BROS. WHOLESALE BUTCHERS AND PACKERS Manufacturers of Washington Brand Hams, Bacon and Lard, Tallow and Neatsfoot Oil ■■—r HIGHEST CASH PRICES PAID FOR ALL KINDS OF LIVESTOCK. 121 Yesler Way,...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 November 1897

\\ ILA YA \\j\l LA Richer than Klondike IF you could get it every year. Or 70 cent wheat, or 50 cent wheat every year, would make your hill ranch profitable. BUT you don't get either figure more than one year in five. NOW that your are 11 ahead of the game," ask your wife and children about securing a HOME and a FRUIT FARfI in Vineland, the new irrigated tract in Asotin County, Washington, opposite Lewiston, Idaho. Great success the first year with corn, berries, sweet potatoes, peanuts and all vegetables; orchards and vine yards are developing wonderfully on scores of fine two to ten acre places. Winter temperature twenty (20) degrees warmer than your hill ranch. Best of SCHOOLS. Regular church services. Easy payments for lands. Low taxes. Pure water at every door. Many families from the hill ranches are making homes in Vineland on account of the schools and pleasant winter climate while keeping and working the ranches. Others change entirely, pre ferring fruits and high-class vege...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 November 1897

i 6 BOB* SI-EDS BUILT ESPECIALLY FOR THIS TRADE OF BEST EASTERN OAK SUITABLE FOR THE FARMER, LOGGER AND MINER MITCHELL FARM AND SPRING WAGONS, BUGGIES AND CARTS Send for Catalogue and Price List ■ell mi mm 1 308-310 First Avenue South . Seattle, Washington WILSON'S • MODERN • BUSINESS • COLLEGE SEATTLE, WASHINGTON ■-..«■■•> > y \*^^ 4* \ Is but one of the departments of this school. Q 1\ A \ aa / K*\% &J^\ Here those of neglected education, or those Vh^ ft W £L\\\\ 0 V WviW^^W wishing to review common English branches are S**7 VU/J VV \y VVW\VV/VVV accommodated. We also have the following de- Bookkeeping, Shorthand and Typewriting, Penmanship and Drawing/Individual Desk Kxperience a firm purpose, love for the work, and a recognition of the demands of a business career, have developed here an up-to-date, practical business training school Four practical business men as teachers. Send for the Practical Fellow. Address: • JUDSON P. WILSON, President. to secure HIGHEST CASH PR...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 11 November 1897

Ranch and Range. Old Series, Vol. 5, No. 23.1 QT71 A TTT "IT WASTT NOVFMRFT? 11 18Q7 New Series, V 01.2, No. 32. bJiiAl 1 LiJli, \VA»±I., INU V .UMISJLIt 11, in»/. WASHINGTON OPPORTUNITIES. Contributed. In the excitement resulting from the recent discoveries of gold in Aiaska, the people of the state of Washington are in danger of overlooking the opportunities they have at home for profitable employment in the production of grain, meat, fruit, vegetables, wool and other necessaries which will be required by the thousands and tens of thousands of people who are going to that bleak and inhospitable country in the near future. That all of these people will require food and clothing whether they find gold or not is indisputable, and that our own state will furnish the nearest and most con venient base of suppplies is also a fact which will not be questioned. If any one will stop to consider but for a mo ment the vast amount of provisions, hay, beef, mutton, pork, eggs, chickens, turkeys...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 11 November 1897

2 Chrisitmas It's a little early to call your attention to Christmas bat the usual Christinas festivities and Christmas Gifts will be given. It's just as well to think about it now and be prepared, because if you put everything offuntil the last minute something will be neglected. Suppose you had some one to suggest hundreds of good things at 104 and 106 First Aye. South. TREATMENT OF WOOLLY APHIS. Last week we reproduced a discussion concerning wooly aphis held at the meeting of King county fruit growers. This question was brought up and a desire expressed for more complete information regarding same. We have succeeded in securing a report of the experiments of J. M. Steadman at the Missouri experiment station, giving results of late re searches: "Experiments were made with tobacco dust, carbon bisul phid and kerosene. In the experiments with carbon bisul phid 20 trees were treated on June 29 by injecting from 1 to 3 ounces of the liquid close to the crown of the tree. As a result,...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 11 November 1897

THOSE FRUIT TREES AGAIN. J. B. Palmer, of Seattle, publishes the following letter, con taining some very distinct charges against King county's horticultural commissioner: "Any one reading the answer of Mr. Brown to my last letter about him would very naturally think that I had butchered the trees of Messrs. Webb, Bridgman, Holmes and others. For the information of all concerned, I ask you to kindly allow me to say that I have never trimmed any apple trees in any orchard of this city except my own and Mrs. Knepe's six years ago. I have repeatedly cautioned men whom I know do trimming not to lop the ends of limbs whereby a bunch of small shoots will afterwards appear, in many instances ten or a dozen shoots in place of the one removed. Any person with common sense can look at the trees in the south ends of both the old and new house of the late Mr. Boman. There is visible snarly brush on the ends of the limbs of the trees to make a lot of small brooms each tree having enough brush fo...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 11 November 1897

4 one whose aim is to be a teacher among the horticulturists of the Northwest, go on record with so erroneous an article as we find in your editorial, on page 8, October 28 issue, without raising a voice to correct. lam referring to the San Jose scale. Prof. Hedrick is not very far from being wrong; in fact with nine out of ten orchards his advice IS correct. In this section, we have had the pest for several years, and al though every method has been tried, up to this time there has not one single orchard that has been able to eradicate the •scale. The most energetic have «.ept them in check, but it is at great expense, but those that have been the least bit careless find that their orchards are nearly ruined. What is worse, we find that the scale is extending in every direction, going miles and miles, yes hundreds of miles of new territory are reporting the scale each year, despite the stringent laws of our states towards the spreading of the pest. I find that it gets a strong hold...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 11 November 1897

KING COUNTY DAIRY INSPECTION. The following dairies were inspected in this district: John Marshell, Van Asselt, 32 cows; Christ Jorgensen, Black River Junction, 26 cows; G. E. King, Renton, 23 cows; Senator Squire, Renton, 61 cows; S. Ellens & Co., Snohomish, 43 cows; miscellaneous dairies, about 30 cows. The majority of the cows were found in a healthy condi tion. In one herd a dry cow was suffering from a severe attack of rheumatism. At another dairy eight calves had died of parasitical bronchitis, and those remaining were all affected, also a few of the cows were slightly affected with the same disease. They were subjected to treatment and are slowly recovering. PARASITICAL BRONCHITIS. Parasites in the trachea and bronchial tubes frequently occur in calves under a year old. It is seen sometimes among older animals, but seldom proves fatal, although it frequently causes great mortality among young calves. These parasites are known as "Strougglus Mecrurus," and are sometimes fo...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 11 November 1897

6 PEACH SHIPHENTS FROM ASHLAND. The Ashland district in Oregon attained quite a distinc tion this season from the fact that it was the o: ly sec Lion in Oregon or Washington that gave a full crop of the late va rieties of peaches. From a report we have at hand we lam that from Ashland Station there were shipped from July to October 34,500 boxes of peaches by freight and 36,100 by ex press. There are a number of other stations in that vicinity that also shipped heavily. This is the first year that Ash land peaches have entered the Eastern markets and the re sults were very pleasing to the growers, who round that their fancy product was very popular. One of the principal grow ers and shippers was Max Pracht, who, in answer to a query for a review of his experience for the season, said: "Ashland has again shown her remissness to her own be^t interests by her failure to provide herself with an up-tc- 'ate fruit cannery. If my orchard is a criterion at least a ton of peaches per acre of ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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