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Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1903

THE RANCH Wltb which Is consolidated The Washington Farmer, The Pacific Coast Dairyman, The Farmer and Dairyman, The Farmer and Turfman MILLER FREEMAN - - Publisher Editorial Offices: - - Seattle, Wash. Tel. Main 1265—Long Distance Connection. Issued Ist and 15th of each month. BUSINESS OFFICES: Seattle - - - Brd Floor Downs Bldg. Spokane - Alexander & Co., 521 First Avenue Subscription (In advance), 50 cents per year. Agents wanted In every town to solicit subscriptions. Good commission and salaries paid. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue Is received from the subscriber. We must be notified In writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot find It on our list from the name alon on the paper. We must have both name and address, and all arrearages or dues must be paid as required by law. Date of expiration of subscription Is Btaown on your paper by address label cont...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1903

4 Horticultural Notes By F. WALDEN. Chas. H. Ross, of Quincy, Wash., recently interviewed the writer with reference to raisins; fruit, especially apples, where the rainfall doos not exceed sixteen inches for the year. As an answer to the inquiry I referred him to a report published in one of the Year Books of the Department of Agriculture. The article was written by the well-known horticulturist, IT. E. Van Deman. The article referred to is in reality a report based on personal observations made by Prof. Van Deman with reference to the effort of Strak Bros., in Colorado. These well-known nurserymen set out some ninety acres of orchard, consisting chiefly of apples, not far from Denver. They expected to irrigate their orchard, but after the first year there was, for some cause, a failure of water, and it looked as if their investment would be a total loss. Those enterprising men had too much grit to give up their venture till every means for saving their trees had been tried. It is s...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1903

Blanchard's Poultry Notes By H. L. BLANCHARD. It is very gratifying to note the progress that has been made in this section of the Northwest during the last few years in the poultry department of farming; and to the influence of The Ranch much credit is due for such conditions. These facts have been forcibly brought to my mind by both ob servation and my correspondence. It is be coming more and more recognized as a prof itable industry when directed by staying qualities and intelligence. Particularly is this true in this Northwest country, where the price of eggs ranges for the year between 20 and 50 cents per dozen, and where, through selection, breeding and more intelli gent feeding and handling are being more and more recognized as the cardinal prin ciples leading to success, and that doubles the egg production of the flock. The hen that lays 12 to 15 dozen of eggs per annum is fast taking the place of the one that laid only seven and eight dozen of eggs. "I don't know how we cou...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1903

6 STATE DARYMEN'S ASSOCIATION. Editor The Ranch. Enclosed please find copy of pro gram of State Dairymen's Meeting. It has been quite a task to get it in shape, people are so dilatory in an swering, and even now we have had to assign most of their topics to the different ones. We think it best to have the ban quet on the evening of the 29th, then it will give the mayor a chance to give his address of welcome, etc. Hoping for a good meeting, I remain, MRS. E. CARMICHAEL, Sec. Tuesday, Dec. 29, 1903. 10 a. m. Meeting caled to order by the president. Reading of the min utes of the last meeting, and report of the secretary and treasurer. Dairying in Central Washington, Adam Stevens. The Agricultural Press, Vice President Win. Izette Tuesday, 1:30 P. M. Annual Address.Pres. H. L. Blanchard The Dairy Cow, T. L. Haecker, Professor of Dairy Husbandry University of Minn. Shall We Build Silos East of the Cas c*3,c!gs Prof. E. E. Elliott, Washington Agricultural College. General Discussion. Tu...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1903

OBSERVATIONS. C. L. Smith. The Methow valley is one of the many localities in the state of Wash ington with a vast wealth of undevel oped resources. The climate is mild, without extremes of either heat or cold, the soil is very fertile, and easi ly cultivated. The rainfall is limited, especially in the valley proper, and ir rigation is necessary for most profit able results; but water is abundant and easily available for irrigation purposes. Alfalfa is the principal crop grown on the rich valley lands under cultivation, producing three and four cuttings of one and a half to two tons per cutting. The bench lands have sufficient moisture to produce good crops of grain, grass, corn, veg etables and the hardy varieties of fruit without irrigation. Stock raising is the principal industry at present, the cattle finding an abundance of rich feed on the bunch grass hills for eight months in the year; after which they are ga;hered in the valleys, pas tured on the aftermath of the mead ows or...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1903

8 FEDERAL IRRIGATION. In response to a request of a staff correspondent of the Minneapolis Jour nal Professor F. H. Newell, chief of the United States reclamation service, dictated the following highly interest ing and instructive account of the fed eral irrigation undertaking, up to date. The United States reclamation ser vice, under the law of June 17, 1902, has been organized for the purpose of making surveys and examinations, and constructing irrigation works for the reclamation of the arid lands of the west. The funds are derived from the disposal of public lands in thirteen states and territories, and the work is confined to these. There is now available upwards of $16,000,000 and this amount is being increased from day to day. In order to carry out the purpose of the law, an engineering corps has been organized, under the civil serv ice rules, each man being selected through competitive examination. These examinations have been based largely on experience in actual plan ning ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1903

ers by this home building movement, and they have contributed largely to the success of the movement. Some of them have land to sell, it is true, but the profit from the sale of the land is as nothing compared to the annual traffic resulting from the establish ment of innumerable homes. The Tail roads might sell the lands to cattle men, but, as a matter 01 business, it would be far better to dona^o them to settlers living on irrigated farms. The manufacturing and jobbing interests of the east have also contributed to this work, as they believe that in the West is the greatest home market for manufactured products. It has sometimes been held up as a reflection against the advocates of national irrigation that the great rail roads and the manufacturers of the East are interested and have contrib uted time and influence to the cause, but in this direction the interests of the people of the country and that of the railroads and industrial organiza tions are iden'ical—namely: To bring to...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1903

IO QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS AT THE FARMERS' INSTITUTE, DAVENPORT. When we cannot grow either alfalfa or red clover, which is the next best forage for dairy cows? Answered by C. L. Smith: Peas and oats. They will yield from tree to four tons per acre of the very best or hay. They also make good ensilage, producing ten to twelve tons per acre. How should they be grown? Many are quite successful drilling them in the same as any small grain; but the best results have been obtained by manur ing the ground, plowing deep, then discing so as to pack the soil. In early spring harrow the ground light ly, broadcast the peas and plow them in fouT and a half inches deep. As soon as they have sprouted an inch to an inch and a half drill in the oats crosswise of the way the land was plowed, roll the ground and fallow with a light smoothing harrow. What kind of peas? The White Canada field pea is most generally used, with the common white oats. Marrowfat peas have given good re sults in the dry distri...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1903

SUCCESSFUL SWINE BREEDNIG. *In order to promo,e successful swine husbandry there a few things that it will be well to keep in mind. There has been too much tendency for brood sows to produce litters small in number, and as one goes about among breeders reports are frequent of litters of four and five pigs. There are several causes for this, but one is a matter of inheritance. Sows from pigs that have farrowed such small litters should not be used for mothers. A process of selection should be adopted, and every Breeder should have a standard to be adhered to ex cepting under unusual circums.ances. Sows should farrow litters of eight or more, and should easily rear, bar ring accident, litters of ten at least, if that number are farrowed. Boars from large litters if possible, should be used for service, so that the tendency will be to develop the prolific habit. If one is a breeder, the difference be tween profit and loss is often one of size of litter. If our breeders will select larg...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1903

12 A NEW EDITION OF 5000 COPIES OF Blanchard's Poultry Book ■-p^mmm This is the fifth edition, making a total of f '.'h /:V'^|&'^ :; flock piiy a liet annual revenue of $2.79 per 20,000 copies that we have published of this W* 'vf/fY |T J,VA heD ' what breeds he kee Ps' how he feeds i ..... i , TjL . . 4-1 j S^"' '^* "^ ; »'Vl^« t- \ -, ''^?v^B them, describes his poultry houses, and gives popular little book. It is in greater demand mr-? - ♦£ik4f^\ **»-; ,-/• 7 „ „,-«,. T . ffijpv * :'MBi^^" :"';^^H much other valuable information. It is cer today than ever. 11. I, Blanchard is a prac- W{<':j> ''mM/i ' 'V^l tainlv worth many times the small price we tical poultryman living in Jefferson county, *fl£* ''■JlaJS^- !^ ask for it. Mailed to any adress upon receipt Wash. lie tells how he makes his farm I^^SBiiiliffiHiSH of 20 cents. The Ranch, -...-- Seattle, Wash. "*^^wl^s^ SANDERS ntei/ pi nIAI %tfrW%kjr vB% MIJ7 Ulwrl ■ L> wWW. ■ m Simplest and Most Perfect Made. Before yo...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1903

////////sz///r/Ar/ttf. yo£ruv///?everre7/v/'c//ouw79///o /e//yot//Ae sfarycfofifqfaSfrcnfap <?/-f*ffsf6vs/*extf/v/*/*y scAoo/s. IffIILSON'S fIO£ERN T £U e SINESS COLLEGE LATEST METHODS BBEST RESULTS. Write us about our POSITION GUARANTEE. One-half dozen fancy cards free. MCLAREN & THOMSON, Cor. Second and Pike, Seattle, Wash. il MASON'S O.K.CAT£ i""^|?-- V MTtliTeD-AWI-M-WM """^ ,J^f v^®[ y^ v^ The or pcßPtCTioii v]^^L in TNtStLP OPEHIHQ' CATt t"*e> %^SM THE LLOYO CO. \. \gfg"T^!^ SOLt AQtMTS AMD MANUFACTURtRS VH^J PtTAuunA cal-, \.» \ "^Snm WMTfc FOR OU(\ Catalogue i a. %■ MONEY TO LOAN On Improved farm land W. D. MACKAY, Ml New York Block. Seattle /^s&v Triple Daily Train Service l^( 4^A I Between V<i^^J/ Puget Sound Points and St. Paul, Minneapolis <^j*gg^> And All Points East. f^7 *•; .-" '*■-^ ***: ~~ r ' ■- * ''I- :-\" '-':- ""' The "North Coast Limited." The most perfectly appointed trains on the Continent. Special Homeseekers' rates via the Northern Pa...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1903

14 I iraT^ SEPARATOR I fi&sl nfiamißAm If you buy the right machine, §89 SUfi /if^pE^,^|H#A and there Is only one right ma- S^9 k| Vlwi DELAVAL H O CREAM SEPARATORS W HH| -^gg^jg** IBjK *SSfe>>. Are used exclusively by every I MSB f^^rtfl BpK^;Jr:lißiki»Z^^^*fcfo large and experienced creamery BBS K^ ffi^JJß^ and dairyman the world over. H5H| Mats IM^aapjJ!^^^^?! - Profit by the experience of Hragl raSH IS^\»BBP^n^ll •*** ■""->••■ 400,000 farmers and equip your BM ■H // Mf^^r^W '■ \ dairy with aDe Laval. Espe- WHM sTjli J¥ Ifw v x"\ ~ cially valuable In home dairy- Bmm BMpH // • I v-^yk" ~ IDS- B m '■'"■-W- fßL^rifK^ \\ > Everything needed in the fIE^BI 8881 [1 j^^fc", if " I dairy business carried by us. |B BsH AbP^HB X^ dlP^ We carry the largest stock of I BbrS I^^^^ " "^<^**" dairy supplies on the Pacific I \\fiN^S • Coast. *mi*4 .Iw^^^y^- Write for the new twentieth W^k m*^^ tUu*^ Century Catalogue. . ■■■ ■ DE LAVAL DAIRY SUPPLY COMPANY I B 217-219 Drumm St., ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1903

Perfect, Portable D i Power Gemmer |g^^@^) Gasoline "^■^^^3^-IS^^^^ Engine. It Is an all day digger that never tires or falls. The best power for pumping water, running Cream Separ ator, wood saw, fan mill, churn, grit. I stone, washing machine, etc. Uses leasi fuel. Is always ready. Develops full 1% H. P. costs but 2% cents per hour when running. Is very simple and strong. Guaranteed 2 years. Send for circular. A. M. FERRELL 2511 Wetmore Aye., Everett, Wash. Farm For Sate 160-acre ranch, two miles from Chelan, on good county road; 40 acres under cultivation; good, level land, clear of rock; fenced with three wires. 120 acres pas ture land, that is homestead re linquishment, all fenced; three springs on the place. Best fruit land in county. Good range; plenty of timber convenient; small house. Offered at a bar gain. Address C. Robinson, 324 Fifth Avenue, Vancouver, B. C. Want You to Know that J. S. KEMP TWENTIETH CENTURY MANURE SPREADER Is the Beat. Has many new and valuable feature...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1903

i 6 A Solid Trainload OF TUBLUAR CREAM SEPARATORS, comprising 40 carloads, was started from the big SHARLPES Factory on November 15th, being the largest of its kind ever made. w. ~~~ V' "1 This shipment was distributed among the various Western agencies. This certainly is J^9^Mt speaking testimony to the popularity of the TUBULAR. A further proof to that effect _^ ifiL is the fact that the SHARPLES Factory is the largest of its kind in the world. If Jl|ll^^^^pll^M|^SS|ll| you own a few cows and are conducting your dairy with the old setting process; write lli^^^^^^^^^^^Pplß us at once for a copy of "THE SEPARATOR" (mailed free), which will give you very '^J^^?^^K^^^R potent reasons why you should discard your old wasteful, poor paying system of dairy- 'mß^:mjj9^KK^^W- --8 ing and place a TUBULAR in your dairy. It will pay for itself in a few months, and | IM mBI •; % positively be the best investment that you ever placed on your farm, and the most liljS|BSH^^RßiiS^^te . ' used, cons...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1903

THE RANCH . Vol. XX. No. 24. SEATTLE, WASHINGTON, DECEMBER, 15, 1903. FRANK L. WHEELER. President Seattle Produce Exchange. Subscription 50c. per Year.

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1903

2 FRANK L. WHEELER. We reproduce on the first page of this issue the likeness of Mr. F. L. Wheeler, who lias been recently elected Secretary of the Seattle Produce Exchange. Mr. Wheeler is too well know m to the majority of our readers to need any introduction. He came to this city from New York in 1889, and in 1892 purchased the famous "Buckskin Mill er" fruit ranch near North Yakima. This was the pioneer commercial orchard of that county. He changed the name to Fruit vale Farm, enlarging the acreage and doing much toward its general improvement, and during the ten years succeeding it became recog nized as one of the model fruit farms of this state. For a number of years Mr. Wheeler has held the position of vice president for the state of Washington of the Northwest Fruit Growers' Association, and has always taken a very active part in the affairs of that or ganization. Last year he came to Seattle and became a member of the commission firm of H. S. Emerson & Co. The Seattle Pr...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1903

THE RANCH With which Is consolidated The Washington Farmer, The Pacific Coast Dairyman, The Farmer and Dairyman, The Farmer and Turfman MILLER FREEMAN • • Publisher Editorial Offices: • Seattle, Wash. Tel. Main 1266—Long Distance Connection. Issued Ist and 15th of each month. BUSINESB OFFICES: Seattle ... grd Floor Downs Bldg. Spokane - Alexander ft Co.. 521 First Avenue Subscription (In advance), 50 cents per year. Agents wanted In every town to solicit subscriptions. Good commission and salaries paid. The paper 1b sent to eacb subscriber until an order to discontinue la received from tbe subscriber. We must be notified In writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes bis paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, a* we cannot find It on our list from the name alon on the paper. We must have both name and address, and all arrearages or dues must be paid as required by law. Date of expiration of subscription Is shown on your paper by address label containing y...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1903

4 Horticultural Notes By F. WALDEN. The question whether spraying will pay or not may be considered as settled. Occa sionally some person who seems to be many years behind the times, may ask the ques tion, "Will it pay to spray?" But the up to-date fruit grower has settled that ques tion long ago. The question with which he is concerned is how to spray. And this how may not have reference so much to the man ner of applying the spray material as to the kind of machinery to be used in doing the work. Some men asked me recently if I used the knapsack sprayer or the bucket sprayer in my orchard work. We passed that period in our spraying experience many years ago. Think of carrying a knapsack to spray sixty acres of bearing orchard where not less than ten thousand gallons of liquid would be required for each spraying and we sprayed five times last year! That would be somewhat like trying to tunnel through a mountain with a tea spoon. We got along fairly well for a time with barrel spray...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1903

Since our last report on the apple market in Seattle there has been some change for the worse. Seattle is rather overstocked with apples, say some of the commission men, and prices have slumped. And the worst thing about the business is that apples are not keeping well and cannot be held, but must be pushed. This will account for some of the meager returns that will be made. Don't charge such returns up to the dishon esty of the commission men, brethren. If we find any of them resorting to dishonest tricks, we will not hesitate a moment to ex pose them, but they have their troubles as well as the growers. We have a commission man in Seattle who was formerly an exten sive fruit grower. He is reported to have said the other day: "When I was a grower I thought all commission men were dishon est; now that I am a commission man, it seems like all growers are dishonest." He ought to hire a cheap man with a good pair of boots and a strong leg to take him out behind his store and kick him f...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1903

6 NEW METHOD TO EXTERMINATE JOHNSON GRASS. Prof. W. J. Spillman, Department of Agri culture. Johnson grass is probably the worst weed in the United States, but un like most bad weeds, it can be util ized as a crop, at least where hay is needed. I would not advise any man to sow Johnson grass on his place unless he already has more or less of it. In that case, if he wants a hay field, and cannot grow alfalfa, I would advise him to sow the seed of John son grass at the rate of about half a bushel to the three pecks to the acre. Land that is free from Johnson grass should be kept free from it. One of the most encouraging things we have learned during the past year regard ing this great pest is that it will not crowd out a good stand of alfalfa. The repeated mowings of the alfalfa field not only keep Johnson grass in check, but cause it gradually to disappear. Any farmer who has rich land in fested with Johnson grass, provided the land is suitable for alfalfa, will do well to sow it. Th...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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