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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1984

MEMORIES OF GRANDMA Continued from page 8. pretty black silk material and I want you to make me a dress." She told me how she wanted it made. She had no pattern, so I took one of her dresses that fit and cut a pattern from it. She wanted small sewn in tucks up and down each side of the waist and a piece set in the front with tucks going across to match the sides. This was sewn in from the pleated skirt to the collar. The cuffs were also tucked to match the front. When I was done, except for the handwork on the cuffs, collar and hem, she said, "It looks just like I wanted it to". I thought it did really look nice, even if I did make it. She looked at Mother and said, "Now Dora, I want you to see that I am buried in this dress." I was not expecting this, and it made me so nervous I could hardly hold the needle to finish. Sure enough when Grandma died, she was buried in the pretty black dress. In October of 1937, Grandma went to stay with my mother and dad. My sisters, the twins, were ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1984

PAGE 10 MOUNTAIN LAUREL DECEMBER, 1984 SHE'D DO IT ALL AGAIN Bp * t j *^>' f « 4rusiicate ' Fo' * ■ ■ fl ■II n[ ■ B fl ■II ||l| fl ■ll mni Etta McPeak holding her Certification of Retirement as a midwife from the Commonwealth of Virginia. Chances are that at the exact moment some of you are reading this story, Mrs. Etta McPeak of Laurel Fork, Virginia will be doing the same thing. Not so remarkable when one considers that more than 35,000 people read the Laurel each month. The remarkable thing is that Mrs. McPeak who will be 90 next June will be doing it without reading glasses. Does it all the time; her Bible, The Mountain Laurel and the Roanoke Times. And this is after more that 40 years of using reading glasses. But there are other remarkable things about "Miss Etta". She has delivered possibly up to 1,000 or more babies. "I just didn't keep count," she says. "Wish I had." From Vesta to Galax and Bell Spur to Dugspur you can find approximately 350 square miles of some ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1984

ELIZABETH'S JOURNAL The following is an excerpt from a journal kept by Elizabeth Cooley McClure of Carroll County, Virginia from 1842 (she was 17 then) until her death in 1843. Her journal not only reflects the day to day world she and her family lived in, but a young girl's hopes and expectations for the future. A special thanks to the Cooley family for sharing it with us. Dec. 10th [1843]. We have finished Amanda's dress, put in and quilted my quilt and made James a wescoat. Lowell Shoat was here Saturday, and James came home that evening and next day went to Carroll Court, him and Frank. Amanda and myself went to Joshua Hankses a visiting. We made Steven Sink a blue coat and James a pair of coarse pantaloons. I have finished my flax hose, and knitting one pair gloves. Frank and James has been chopping; last Thursday Mr. Banner was here and sold Papa some leather. Yesterday I went and got Abner to come here and cut out our shoes. Today Calvin Jones is to be buried. I had liked to ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1984

PAGE 12 MOUNTAIN LAUREL DECEMBER, 1984 NEW SHOES FOR RICK "Virgie", as those close to her called her, was reared in the coal mine country of western Virginia . She and her six brothers and sisters were deserted by their father while still young. Their mother did the best she could for them, but they were often hungry and Dacked clothes to wear. Widowed herself, with three small children, Virgie was destined to live out her days in poverty. All of these experiences gave her great compassion for abused and neglected children. Virgie had a neighbor couple who were alcoholics and their children would often seek refuge at Virgie's house when conditions became intolerable at home. The neighbor's 12 year old son Rick was a bright boy who didn't have decent clothes to wear to school. One day he went to Virgie in tears. His father and mother had promised to buy him a pair of shoes on payday. Payday came and they bought whiskey instead. Friends came by with more whiskey and now they were all ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1984

FROM THE JOHN HAYES HOLLOW: I REMEMBER MAMA ON WASHDAY If you have enjoyed the stories of the John Hayes Hollow by my sister Hazel Hedrick, well here's one more. Hazel was the oldest of our clan, (she was called "Big Sis") I was the youngest. Although George C. was my name, I was called Clayton, and never knew about my name being George until I joined the Navy at the age of 18. Through the years, I managed to shorten the Clayton to "Clay", but never could pick up the George, at least not by family. As for the story, I remember Mama... I remember Mama....How she would always sing while she worked on wash days. "Big Sis" would go to the field and Mama would stay at the house to do the weekly wash and cook dinner and supper for the family. I, being, the youngest, would get to stay with her to take care of the helping chores. I'm sure the rest thought Clay was getting a break, but I'm not so sure. On wash day, it went something like this...."Clayton, carry enough water to fill the wash ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1984

PAGE 14 MOUNTAIN LAUREL DECEMBER, 1984 The Mail Box Dear Editor: I just sent in my subscription to your paper. A friend gave, me a couple of copies. He knew I loved the mountains. I do and especially your area. I am a retired Methodist minister. Thirty years ago, I was pastor of Rockfors St. church in Mount Airy. While there I did some trout fishing in the upper reaches of the Dan River. The place where we started reminded me of the story you had about Caleb and Henry camping. There was a beautiful camping place. At one spot I had to leave the river and walk the bank. There was a fallen hemlock with a row of small seedlings along the side of the log as thick as hair on a dog's back. I did not have a camera. At the risk of seeming vandalistic, but out of sentimental love for the place, I pulled one of those sprouts, put it in my creel, took it home, potted it and nourished it. We moved it with us wherever we moved. When we settled in Stanley County, I planted it beside the driveway. ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1984

Genealogy I would like to know if any of you readers could help me gather information for my family genealogy research. My grandfather was born in either Grayson or Carroll County on Sept. 2, 1&31. His name was Daniel Dixie Brinkley. His father Crosley T. Brinkley, married Ona Lee Gardner from Hillsville, Va. (Daniel Gardner-Nancy Spence). Also I'd like information on Thomas Brinkley, Charles Brinkley, Pheba Drason, 1850's - Surry Co., N.C. Crosley Brinkley, Rosanne Simpson married March 18, 1798 in Orange Co. N.C. Also the children of Thomas & Pheba Brinkley - Martin, Ruth E., Rebecca J., Crosley, Henry, Frances and Lucinda, all lived in Surry Co. in 1850 and iB6O. Thank you, Alice Russell Walston 201 First St. Tarboro, N.C. 27886 Subscribe Today To The Mountain Laurel A Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life Send A Gift! 1 Year (12 Issues) Only *6.00 or Christmas, Happy New Year, Get 2 Year (24 Issues) Only SIO.OO Well Soon, Anniversary, Happy Birthday or Thinkin...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1984

PAGE 16 MOUNTAIN LAUREL DECEMBER, 1984 NEW GENEALOGY SOURCE BOOK AVAILABLE Mr. O.E. Pilson of Ridgeway, Virginia has just published a book. This book is the cumulation of information that has taken him the last eight years to compile. Mr. Pilson's family came from the Elamsville section of Patrick County and he describes himself as, "An old codger born on Patsy's Branch at the foot of Abners Ridge." He was born there on May 11, 1910. Ever since he was a kid he has always been interested in history. He graduated from Georgetown College in Kentucky and has a Master's in Education from the University of Virginia. He served many years as high school principal at schools in both Patrick and Henry Counties. As a matter of fact, he was the last high school principal at Red Bank School in Patrick County before it became an elementary school. His last five years were spent as principal of Ridgeway Elementary School and he has been retired for the last fifteen years. When Mr. Pilson retired, ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1984

I c/?i Olc zo/z, j| 4 £ o/n, jgr J§ COUNTRY CONVENIENCE MARKET M. 0. HWY. 57, STUART, VA. SMITH'S GROCERY & HARDWARE % 9 PHONE: 703-930-3071 HWY 221, COPPER HILL, VA jg Gorceries, Beer & Wine Off Prem. PHONE: 703-929-4979 |p Exxon Gas, Feeds, Hardware ijf? i COLLIERS STORE FAMILY DISCOUNT | M MAIN STREET, FLOYD, VA. « M HWY. 221, DUGSPUR, VA. PHONE: 703-745-4878 W. jg PHONE: 703-728-2488 HEALTH & BEAUTY AIDS || BLUE RIDGE RESTAURANT BOYDS STORE 'MR Downtown Floyd, Va. s> LO CUST ST., FLOYD, VA. § yjz Phone: 703-745-2147 PHONE: 703-745-2651 Wf 1 "GOOD HOME STYLE COOKING" clothing, Groceries | Open 7 days a Week | STOP 8 FOOD STORE VIRGINIA 500 FRUIT MARKET g §f PHONE: 703-694-7081 HWY 52 » ot*/ f 3 M c . £ 10 PHONE: 703-755-3104 i*fc SI Mon " S c at ' 6arn ~ l2 m i ld Q night We ship anywhere! W„ W* un ay, ti Country Hams Our Specialty f- ——— m M VIRGINIAN RESTAURANT St TUGGLES GAP REST. & MOTEL STUART, VA. : S W Blue Rid g e...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1984

PAGE 18 MOUNTAIN LAUREL DECEMBER, 1984 High in the North Carolina hills, amid the flaming shades of autumn, my Daddy's Aunt Dosha used words to put together the bits and pieces of her life. The mountain language and spirit produced a pattern as colorful as a patchwork quilt. Her small house, grayed by time and weather, is located just outside of Franklin, North Carolina. I sat on the steps. She sat on the porch in a Kentucky rocker. Her eyes, dark as hickory nuts, swept in the mountains surrounding us—mountains covered with golden maples, scarlet dogwoods and evergreens. We could hear a waterfall, too far away to be visable, trinkling over rocks. Aunt Dosha had lived in that place so long she seemed to be part of the scenery. Gnarled hands clutched the chair arms as she rocked back and forth, back and forth. She spit snuff into an empty coffee tin and began talking about her childhood. "From sunup to sundown, we was in them fields working. We didn't have no fancy tractor neither. I ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1984

CHRISTMAS RECIPES One old time social gathering for young people was a taffy pull. My mother said that at such a gathering, a batch of taffy was made and a plate buttered for each couple. A part of the taffy was poured onto each plate and each couple pulled it together. Taffy is pulled as it gets cool enough to handle and is pulled until the candy is light in color. Some people twist it into fancy shapes, some pull it into thin strips and braid them together . The main ingredient in taffy is molasses. Since molasses has a high iron content, it's good for you besides being just plain good. If you have never tried your hand at taffy pulling, it could turn out to be both enjoyable and delicious! Making taffy might become one of your own family holiday traditions. MOLASSES TAFFY V/ 2 cups molasses 3/4 cup sugar 2 teaspoons cider vinegar 1 tablespoon butter Put all ingredients in a 3 quart saucepan. Stir until sugar is dissolved, cooking over a medium heat, stiring constantly until syrup...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1984

PAGE 20 MOUNTAIN LAUREL DECEMBER, 1984 MOUNTAIN MEMORIES Editor's Note... The following article was sent to us by Mr. Ted Rorrer of Madison, North Carolina shortly before his death. Mr. Rorrer was from this area and still had a house in Mayberry. In this article, he told about the his early memories of farming as it was done in the days of his youth and compared them with today's modern methods. I am well past 80. I thought some of your far away readers might be interested in the way we did things back then and the changes that have taken place. I was born in Carroll County, Rorrer, Virginia about half a mile from Reed Island Springs Church. My nephew, Ivern Turman, owns the home place at present. My father was George F. Rorrer and about 1880 he married Susan Ingram Handy They operated the hotel at Stuart, Virginia and Dad was also the jailer. He and his brother, Charlie Rorrer moved to Carroll County between Isßo and 1885They proceeded to build a general merchandise store at the fo...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1984

MOUNTAIN MEMORIES Continued from page 20. machine down the row which shucks the corn and puts it in a trailer attached to the harvesting machine. Corn was value when I was a boy. It sold for SI.OO per bushel. A man worked for 100 an hour. If he was short of corn, he would work 10 hours for a bushel. Back then we only got 25 to 30 bushels per acre. Now they expect from 100 to 150 bushels. On test acros they have reached nearly 300 bushels to the acre. The millers back then who ground the corn into meal took a toll bf 1/Sth on one gallon out of each bushel. Corn at present varies from $2.50 to $3.00 per bushel. Hay was and still is an important QUALITY LOG HOMES AT AFFORDABLE PRICES beautiful, Natural Way To Live \ THE SHAWNEE IMPROVED V:, LOG HOME PACKAGE * | Pre ' cut Lo 9 Second Floor Joists "' ino Doors "THE BLUE RIDGE" * Snow Blocks ... ,„ AA __ . e=i • Hardboard Splines 30x50 1500 SQ* FT. 1 * 5 - s( S|5 a ™ OU W * Gasketing ■ '■■■> —I Li a ps oining _ _ . OPTIONS: k S...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1984

PAGE 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL DECEMBER, 1984 "We gonna get shot for chicken thieves is what we gonna do, Caleb", said Henry as the two old men sneaked up to the ramshackled old house in total darkness. "They traded the last of their chickens over a month ago to Jesse Seavers for a new ax to cut firewood and a hundred pound sack of cornmeal, Henry. Jesse told me so himself. Said he tried to give 'em the ax and the cornmeal but Jim wouldn't hear of it. Jesse said he was sure it hurt Jim's feelings that he offered it, but he was just trying to help." "That Jim Evans is sure a proud man," whispered Henry. "Yea he sure is," agreed Caleb. "Why you'd think he was the only man in the world to ever face hard times." The two old men quietly made their way up to the porch of the Evans home. It was well past midnight and into the early morning hours of Christmas day. Caleb was carrying a Christmas tree complete with decorations and an angel on top and Henry had a hundred pound feed sack slung over hi...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1984

OLD FASHION WEDDING CUSTOMS I want to talk about the way people used to do back when I was around 6 or 7 years old. When people got married back then, very few went away on what is called their honeymoon. Then, the newly married couple would move in with their parents for awhile. But, on the wedding night, that's when the people of the community would get together and serenade them. That also meant the man got rode around the house on a fence rail and the woman in a big washing tub. Now if the newly married couple and their parents were good to the people that was doing the serenading, they usually would not stay long. But, if they weren't, the crowd would tote off the wash pot, stop up the chimney and tear things up in general. Now I can remember when I was 7 years old my uncle, Corbett Tipton got married. Along about dusk dark, I never before heard such a racket coming down the road. Some were beating on tin pans, hollering, some playing music on a banjo and violin. I ran in the h...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1984

PAGE 24 MOUNTAIN LAUREL DECEMBER, 1984 "Wo<U>C WK Q: Why don't wild animals starve to death while they are hibernating? (From Kitty Plaster, Bassett, Virginia) If animals just ate a lot and then went to sleep for the winter, but their bodies continued its normal chemical activity (called metabolism), they would probably starve to death. Since that is not the case, what does happen? Hibernation is not a mere winter sleep. It ,is much more complex and not entirely understood by scientists. There are many animals that hibernate, including insects, spiders, turtles, snakes, even fish, but I assume your question is about mammals, the warm blooded animals. With mammals, the animal's temperature decreases greatly, and its metabolism is considerably reduced. Metabolism is the process in which food is changed into energy, new cells, waste products, etc. Also, the mammal's breathing and heart rate slows way down to almost a deathlike condition. In this state very little ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1984

L. GRADY BURGISS - POET LAUREATE OF SURRY COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA L. Grady Burgiss was born in 1902 in Yadkin County, North Carolina, near Winsor's Cross Roads. His father was Thomas Edward Burgiss, a farmer and school teacher. When Mr. Burgiss was about 12, the family moved to Elkin, about 15 miles from his birthplace. His father started a grocery business there and his mother operated a small hotel. After about two years, both businesses failed and the family suffered serious financial difficulties. Grady helped out the family by selling newspapers and buying his own clothes. He also did odd jobs for people as he could find them. At 14, he was working a 60 hour week at a furniture factory at l\/& an hour, with $2.70 as his maximum weekly wage. By 1916, because of the poor health of his mother and financial difficulties, Grady was forced to quit school and help support his family full time. By 1925, Mr. Burgiss felt the call to the Gospel ministry and made plans to re-en...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1984

PAGE 26 MOUNTAIN LAUREL DECEMBER, 1984 "Old 'So-and-So's' wife came with him today. She'd rather come along than kiss him goodby", rattled the announcer from some unseen spot among the onlookers. The crowd had gathered around a 15 foot tall pole which a rather puzzled looking raccoon was being hoisted up and down, from within the safe confines of a wire mesh cage, much to the raccoon's consternation, and the frustration of an assorted lot of "coon dogs'.' This event was labeled a "treeing contest". The dog that barked the most in a specified amount of time would be chosen as the winner. After the winner had been chosen and the raccoon was being carried from the circle of onlookers in the safety of his cage, an overzealous hound dog mistook the carrier of the cage for his quarry and the resultant "nip" on the bottom brought a chuckle from the crowd and a jump and brisk rub of the nipped area from the carrier of the cage. The "treeing contest" was only a small part of the activities a...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1984

THREE CENTURIES OF CHRISTMAS Lavish Victorian, colonial and pre-colonial festivities, along with many contemporary activities mark this year's celebration of over three centuries of Christmas in Virginia. More than three dozen holiday events are being elaborately staged all across the state. Visitors can savor the rich elegance of a Victorian family Christmas at many celebrations annually held across the state. At the Maymont Christmas Open House in Richmond, December 9, the Dooley Mansion will be once again be decked with Victorian holiday trimmings as costumed interpreters lead special tours of the house. On the grounds, carriage rides, a musical storyteller, bellringers, St. Nick and a "Little People Only" gift shop for children are just a few of the events scheduled throughout the afternoon, with a community sing at dusk. Charlottesville features citywide "Yuletide Traditions" celebrations, December 7-31, including the trimming of a Victorian Christmas tree at President James Mo...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1984

HEART OF THE BLUE RIDGE' T\ounuin i« W"" * Copyright 1984 Laurel Publications Inc. 1 y DECEMBER jm M , mj, y,l 1984 Monthly Journal of Mountain Life PAGE 28 A self-guided monthly tour of Mountain Backroads mountains never get to see the really pretty places that are hidden away can mountain back roads. As residents who love and appreciate a stream gurgling through a glade or a deer standing in a roadside meadow or an old weathered barn tucked away in a mountain hollow, our BACKROAD column allows us to share Dur favorite spots with you. "Never take the main roads, they're the future with their stores, offices and service stations. Always travel the backroads. You *can see the future tomorrow but backroads are the past and someday they may be gone. On backroads you can see old weathered barns with wagons and horse drawn hayrakes. There are meadows fenced with old chestnut rails and creeks that bubble and cascade over rocks that have never known pollution. There's a part of our heritag...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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