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Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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DAIRYING IN SANTA CRUZ. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

DAIRYING IN SANTA CRUZ. The Santa Cruz Sentinel, after going at length into the caused of the poor quality of the butter and cheese which has heretofore been made in this State, arrives at the conclusion that things in that resiiect, have very much changed, of late, and that the most delicious butter and cheese is now made here, which commands prices in proportion. Dairymen are getting rich hand over hand. Their OOWB are of the best breeds and feed upon a thousand hills. Only heifer calves of the choicest cows are saved for milkers; the poorer ones being converted into veal. The most extensive dairying at this time is carried on in Marin county; and butter from that section of the State, has steadily, until quito lately, commanded a premium. The Sentinel, however, claims that Santa Cruz is now taking a stand by the side of Marin. That paper speaks as follows of the present and prospective value of this interest in that connty=- What can we say for that portion of Santa Oruz comity l...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

TuijE Land Reclamation. —JosiahPoole, of Rio Vista, who has cultivated tulo lands for a period of eighteen years, has invented a machine which it is said materialy reduces the work of reclamation. The machine is termed the Rotary Sod Cutter, and consists of a substantial wooden framework, arranged after the harrow style, with small iron wheels. In a line between the two wheels, are seven circular knives. These knives are fourteen inches in diameter, seven inches apart, and cut to a depth of seven inches. The framework is raised by a simple brake applicatian, when the knives are not in use, and can then be drawn about as easily as a cart. The cutter is said to work to a (/harm, and to bo far superior to the plow. The machine is on exhibition at Baker & Hamilton's, Front street, near Market. Experience has fully shown that the tule lands when reclaimed by levees, and properly broken up for cultivation, form some of the richest and most valuable farm lands in the State; and...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
POTATOES ON SHERMAN ISLAND. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

POTATOES ON SHERMAN ISLAND. The finest potatoes raised in the central portions of the State are from Sherman Island, from whence large quantities are received at this market, and quite late in the season. The light rains which fall there, compared with the rain fall in many other portions of the State, allows them to remain in the ground until very late in the season—until after the first flight rains, whereby they are kept fresh and in good condition for the market. Hundreds of acres still remained in the ground, there until towards if not quite to the middle of last month. The natural moisture in the soil, kept near the surface by the high water in the river during the spring and early summer, promotes a rapid growth of all kinds of vegetation on these lands. The top soil gets the benefit of the. warmth of the sun, while the proper moisture is at the same time being greatly and abundantly supplied to the roots of the plants. Potatoes on this Island yield about 125 bushels, or $108...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURAL NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURAL NOTES. Sugar Beet on Grand Island. —The Yolo Mail of the 9th inst. has the following concerning sugar-beet culture on Grand Island. "We are informed that a company of capitalists have made partial arrangements to enter extensively into the cultivation of the sugar-beet on Grand Island, or rather on a largo quantity of the land reclaimed by the Swamp Land Reclamation Company. This land is particularly adapted to the beet, as it is of a swampy nature, and retains moisture nearly all the year round. The intention is to make the experiment of cultivating large quantities, and if successful, to procure machinery and erect works for the manufacture of sugar. A new machine for taking off the hido of dead cattle will shortly be tried at Buenos Ayres. The operation is short, sharp, and decisive, requiring only a minute for each hide. Cold air is forced by a pump between the flesh and the hide, and the thing is done. The peojjie of Anaheim have had twelve years' experi...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Eastern Agricultural Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

Eastern Agricultural Notes. It is estimated that 5,000,000 trees aro planted annually in the State of lowa, two farmers in Grundy having set 26,000 this spring. Cheese for England.—A New York cheese factory made 75 large cheeses for the English Christmas market. The average weight was about 300 pounds each. Some Pumpkins.—A firm at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, has entered into a contract to furnish 200,000 pumpkins, to be delivered at Portland within the next twelve months. The purchasers propose to can them. A Beet Harvester. —A person in France has constructed a plow which lifts beets and turnips from the ground, and throws them aside from the swinging mold board. The plants are then topped by women who follow the plow. One of these plows, worked by a man and a pair of horses, will take out two and one-half acres of bulbs or roots in a day.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
INDUSRTIAL MISCELLANY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

INDUSRTIAL MISCELLANY. The Hope For Oaufobkia. —The Gilrov Advocate very truly says that the hope for California, lies in the establishment of manufactories throughout the State, wherever material can be provided for them,and motive power can be supplied. When we shall manufacture our own sugar, instead of buying it abroad; when we shall fabricate our own cloth from our own wool and possibly, cotton, instead of paying England to do it for us, expending immense Bums for freight both ways; when, in short, the money now sent abroad for manufactured articles will be kept at home to enliven every business relation, then will have dawned the day of prosperity for our State. Cheese Making in California. —Our cheese-men, says the San Jose Mercury. have finally succeeded in tilling the market with their productions, so there is no immediate necessity for any further importations in that line. Home made cheese equal to the best Eastern manufacture, is now a drug in the hands of the producers....

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
An Improved Flour Mill. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

An Improved Flour Mill. In our great wheat-producing state, any device which has to do with the production or treatment of this important staple is of interest. There is a gentleman, who thinks that he has an invention which will be particularly valuable to our farmers, as well as to others who need grinding machinery. An illustration of this invention is here given. It is called the "Iron-Clad" mill, and is constructed with a view to simplicity and efficiency. It has comparatively few pieces, small weight and great strength; and is said to grind better and faster than the common kinds. As to its work, we give one example. We have a letter from Mr. M. A. Gee, of the North-Western Flour mills, at Milwaukee, and this wo publish with a few unimportant alterations. The gentlemen writes: After a trial of four months, notwithstanding my strong prejudice at the beginning, I am delighted with the Iron Clad. \\Y tested it by running it by the side of a wry choke. 4-foot Imhr, both on the sam...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Melon Sugar Making. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

Melon Sugar Making. Editors Press:—The success of the Alvarado beet sugar works in placing upon the market an excellent grade of white, granulated sugar, at a cost that successfully competes with the sugars of the refiners, very naturally tends to awaken a lively interest as to the future of this great indus. try—Whether the five millions of dollars that are now paid annually for sugars to supply our -wants, shall continue to flow away from us, to foreign countries; or whether within three years from this, California will be the i>roducer of all she consumes and a large supply for a vast country east of the Sierras. The works at Alvarado conclusively show that with the use of a largo capital, ranging from #100,000 to $200,000, white sugar, equal to the best of the refiners' goods, is made and sold at a large profit. But the large capital required to make sugar upon this 2>lan, entirely precludes the possibility of sugar making becoming that general industry tha...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
POPULAR LECTURES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

POPULAR LECTURES.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Vaporization and Elastic Force of Steam. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

Vaporization and Elastic Force of Steam. [Prof. John LeOomtk before the 'Mechanic: Ahts Oot lgob, Mechanics' Institute Hull, s, I. Boported expressly for tho Paxaa.] Heat and Work. Lect. V., Feb. 11. —In my last lecture, said the Professor, I stated that heat wan convertible into work and work into heat. It is of iinportaneo to find out how much work is necessary to generate a certain amount of heat, or how much heat is required to perform a certain amount of work. The most accurate; experiments to determine this were made by J. P. Joule, of Manchester, England, who was engaged from 1843 to 1849 in these researches. Before speaking of these, I must say something about what the units of heat and work are. If we measure anything, we must have a unit to refer to. Thus, for distances we have a unit of length; for weights a unit of weight, etc. All units are necessarily arbitrai-y, and unfortunately different nations have chosen different units. The English unit of work is that required ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Ice-Boats and Fast Trains. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

Ice-Boats and Fast Trains. The Dutch amusement of steel-runner boat-sailing on the ice has been introduced upon the Hudson. There is a club at Poughkeepsie which .owns a number of such boats, two of which are called the Zephyr and the Icicle. A short time ago these boats had a race with the Chicago Express train on the Hudson River Railroad. The race is thus described by a correspondent of the New York Times. On the day named, the wind blew hard from the southwest, striking the boats on the quarter. Both vessels were on the ice north of the Whale Dock, and at a standstill within one hundred feet of the east shore, w^en the whistle of the locomotive of the train with which they were to race sounded. This to the tiller-men of the Zephyr and Icicle was a starting signal. In an instant they were in their boats lying at full length, when they "down stick" and put their crafts on the wind. Then came the race. The passengers on the cars raised the windows and waved their hats and handkerch...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
OUR WEEKLY CROP. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

OUR WEEKLY CROP. We have hung up a magnificent Bunch of Oranges at the entrance of our ranch. They arc from Los Angeles, and the specimen is one of the finest we have ever seen, heard of, or read about. Our visitors aro welcome to help themselves. By tho side of the oranges, we have pasted up, on the gate posts, a list of Things to be Remembered on the Farm, although the list is incomplete; and while receiving our friends we make a few introductory remarks on the Weather and the Crops. We look over, as usual, the library of Mechanical and Scientific Progress, and then we rend our letters. These come from very different parts of the country,—one from Merced County; one from Pennsylvania; and from Florida we have a description of a Remarkable Body of Water. We have a very interesting talk with Dr. Thomas on Ancient Agriculture, and a cheerful Farm-House Chat with a Santa Cruz lady. Santa Cruz calls our attention again to its flourishing Dairy Business; and we get a collection of misce...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE ORCHILLA. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

THE ORCHILLA. The discovery of this valuable "wood" ov lichen on the coast of Lower California, near the ne\r settlement at Magdalenn Bay, seems io be creating considerable excitement among certain parties in this city. Quite a number of small vessels have already gone thither to gather the moss, and other parties are making preparations to follow. A question of "right" seems also to have arisen; n certain company claiming the exclusive privilege to gather the moss within the limits of the Lower California Company's territory, warns off all others as trespassers. Should this matter of right be persisted in, it is feared that trouble may grow out of the interference by outside parties; especially as the location is at a very long distance from any well-established civil power. The orchilla (which seems to be the correct spelling, rather than "orchella") was originally obtained chiefly from the Canary Islands. The average annual imports into England for IS4O-1-2 were only 8,060 pounds...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
PLANTING VINEYARDS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

PLANTING VINEYARDS. Thoi-e arc throe principle modes of planting vineyards, each of which has its advantages and its advocates. First:—by cuttings. This mode is where the canes are severed from the original vine and cut up into pieces and planted out where it is intended they shall remain until they become bearing vines and ..constitute the permanent vineyard. Second: —by roots. This mode differs from the tirst in this: That when the cuttings have been made from the canes, they are planted in trendies, close together, to remain until they have formed roots, and thus converted into what are termed young vines. They are generally allowed to remain in this form for one year, when they are taken up and planted out in the vineyard form for permanent growth. Third: —by layers. By this mode the canes aro not severed from the original vine until separate roots have been formed for the young vine. By this last mode the manner of proceeding is about as follows: The land designed for the viney...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Planting the Cuttings. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

Planting the Cuttings. Before the cuttings are planted, the soil should be well prepared and pulverized. In plowing however, the soil should not be turned over with the common pIoAV any deeper than it had been previously worked, unless it be summer-fallowed, so as to expose the soil turned up to the action of the sun, and for sometime before planting. In all cases the soil should be well and deeply sub-soiled, especially in the line where the cuttings are to be planted. This may be done while striking or marking out the land for the rows. Put the common plow as deep as the land was first plowed, going back and forth in the same furrow, then follow in the same manner with the subsoil plow. The cuttings should be set in a slanting position at an angle, say of about forty-five degrees and, should be covered so that the upper end will be entirely out of sight, say one inch below the surface. If planted erect, the roots will only start at the extreme lower end, Avhile if slanted, roots w...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
MR. BRANNAN AND HIS PROJECTS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

MR. BRANNAN AND HIS PROJECTS. A correspondent of the Alta gives quite an interesting account of some of the many agricultural projects of our wealthy and energetic fellow-citizen, Samuel Brannan, Esq. Among his more notable projects is the establishment of An Agricultural College at Calistoga. The institution, in fact, is already under way, and numbers sixteen students, who have entered for a three-years' course. These boys, whose ages average from 15 to 18 years, arc not only instructed in all that is required to make theoretical farmers; but are drilled, in the practical duties of funning in all its branches. This benificent project, if properly managed, will prove of great benefit to the State, and its progress and development will be watched with much interest. Grain Cultivation. Mr. Brannan, here and at his farms in other counties, is cultivating about 2,500 acres of grain this season, which he proposes to increase next year to 0,000 acres ! His grain fields are abroad; carpete...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
FLORICULTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

FLORICULTURE.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE LITTLE PELICAN FLOWER. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

THE LITTLE PELICAN FLOWER. We present herewith a neatly executed figure of the Little Pelican Flower, (Orthocarpus pusillus,) one of California's tiny florets anil about the smallest of its genus. The flowers of this species are exceedingly diminutive —not larger than a pin's head. When in full bloom and fruit they are only two or three inches high; but they often form broad, purplish -brown patches along the waysides, in the fields and on the hillslopes, presenting a rich and beautiful appearance. The common name by which the flower is known is derived from its having a lobed or folded pouch or sack under its bill-like form, similar to the pouch under the bill of the pelican. Many of the species of this flower are exceedingly beautiful and very fragrant; and it is a marvel that they have never yet found their way into our gardens, where they would produce a fine effect in borders or beds. The objection that the roots are parasitic is not sustained by observation; the supposition ar...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SOIL FOR FLOWERS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

SOIL FOR FLOWERS. The soil for flowers should be looked up and prepared during the winter season. V§ry few understand that au occasional change is very beneficial to flowers in beds, though all how important it is to flowers in pots. There is nothing better than surface soil from old fields, taken off about two inches deep, aD d thrown into a heap with about one-sixth part old hot-bed dung to partially decay. In addition to this "staple" item, a small quantity of different matters should be gathered together for peculiar plants. Peat, for instance, will be found very useful for many kinds of plants, or any spongy, fibrous substance from the surface of bogs and boggy wastes. Sand should be collected sharp and clean; the washingfl from road-sides are as good as anything. Leaf mould is best got, already well decayed from the woods. That which one makes for himself from rotten leaves is seldom good; it is generally sour and "indigestible" to vegetation. A load or so of well decayed cow ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE HOME CIRCLE [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 February 1871

THE HOME CIRCLE BY OITU LADY EDITORS.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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