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Elephind.com contains 937,800 items from Sunday Times, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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NEW STYLE OF CALF PEN. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 11 May 1902

NEW STYLE OF CALF PEN.   The ordinary calf pens are generally too   dark, and not sufficiently ventilated for the health of the occupants. The plan shown in our sketch (from the American Agricul- turalist) will be found to answer well. Instead of boarding up the sides closely, make an   opening and enclose with heavy poultry or sheep wire netting. The pen will be thus made more airy and cheerful. The netting opening should not be on the exposed side of the pen.

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
A VINE TRELLIS. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 11 May 1902

A VINE TRELLIS. In some of the vine-growing districts of the United States growing the vines on trellis is preferred to the stake system.   Various methods are practised to arrange this matter in a practical and economical manner. The form of trellis shown in our sketch has answered fairly well. It is easily made, and is fixed at such a height as best suits the climate of the locality.   The vines are fastened to the single wire, and are trained to grow over the two top wires, the branches hanging down on each side, often nearly to the ground.

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
FEEDING GRIT OR SHELLS. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 11 May 1902

FEEDING GRIT OR SHELLS.   The illustration shows a handy box for oyster shells or grit. It is filled at the top,   and is self-feeding. For winter use as grit   nothing is quite so good as the small quarry stone fragments which may be obtained for     almost nothing at any stoneyard. These   are kept on hand sifted to the right size of     the poultry supply stores, and are now quite commonly used by the best professional   poultrymen. If there is no quarry or stone- yard near by a grit that will answer very well is a barrel or two of gravelly sand, some of which should be shovelled into the coop every week or two in winter. Oyster   shells are not hard enough to take the place of grit.—American Agriculturist.

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
CONTROLLING DOORS OF FARM BUILDINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 11 May 1902

CONTROLLING DOORS OF FARM BUILDINGS. Our sketch of a device for controlling the doors of farm buildings is from the American Agriculturist. It shows how a door may be kept open at any point for ventilation or other purposes. A blacksmith can make this contrivance in 15 minutes, and it will   be worth dollars when put in use. The rod   can be attached inside the door frame, if   preferred. Use 3/8in. round iron, and attach   high enough up so that one can walk under the rod when in use.

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
FARM LABOR. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 11 May 1902

FARM LABOR.   ___   One of the most potent factors of the day to agriculturists is the question of efficient labor, how to supply it, how to maintain it, and how to make it more capable. The present inadequate supply is mainly due to the em- ployers not furnishing more continuons labor ; better and cleaner lodgment for the hands ; furnishing an inadequate table, with ill-prepared food; the long hours of work, and insufficient pay to qualified hands, horse-drivers, ploughmen, stack builders, and butter makers. Expert hands add to the value of the farm stock, making the draught stock more efficient and the dairy stock give more and richer milk in consequence of more skilled attendance. A larger proportion of eight hours a day work than now obtains (if any) on a farm should be introduced, which would result in fully As Much Work Being Done, and of a better class, as is shown in all lines under the 8-hour system, and there would be a corresponding advantage to ...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
HORSE BREEDING. STARTING THE STUD. (Written for the SUNDAY TIMES.) No. III. The Circassian Pony. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 11 May 1902

HORSE BREEDING. STARTING THE STUD.   (Written for the SUNDAY TIMES.) No. III. The Circassian Pony. This is one of the most beautiful varieties of true ponies. In height the most of them run to about 13 hands. They are smaller and neater every way than the lions, greatly owing to their being more and of much later infusion of the best of Arab blood. The Circassians are horsemen to a man. And the chiefs vie with one another in producing the most perfect models. Probably they are the most shapely and natty of all the ponies. Being mountain bred, they have all the attributes of their environment to perfec- tion—wonderfully active and sure-footed. The greatest care is used in mating them. The sires must be known to be particularly good, as well as being of pure blood, and this system bas been carried on so long that atavism is almost unknown. The chiefs will not part with the best of them, especi- ally the mares, at any price, and only the culls can be bought in the Tribison...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
SEND IT IN. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 11 May 1902

SEND IT IN. THE SUNDAY TIMES wants good original   matter from any source. If any of our readers know a good story with local color-   ing, a humorous anecdote with ditto, a bit of special news not snapped up by some other paper, any interesting or amusing bit of personal or local gossip, send it in to the   SUNDAY TIMES. The SUNDAY TIMES will     take it. The SUNDAY TIMES will pay for it. We shall even take poetry—provided it is poetry, or even blank verse, and not merely drivelling doggeral. We don't want things that are only of interest to one person, or even to two person. We want matter that can be understood and read with interest in any part of the State or Commonwealth. Send in the matter and name reasonable terms. If it is any good and worth the price, we will publish it and pay for it. All we shall demand is that it shall be fire-new and widely interesting.    

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
The Sunday Times SUNDAY, MAY 11, 1902. ROE AND THE DOCTORS. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 11 May 1902

THE SUNDAY TIMES SUNDAY, MAY 11, 1902 ROE AND THE DOCTORS. The case of Bingeman, the chemist,   who was brough up before Mr. Roe a little while ago on a charge that ac- cused him of having trespassed on the   exclusive domain of the medical fra-   ternity, in that he gave a lotion to a man with a cold in his eye, will be still fresh in the memory of our readers.   Mr. Roe then sided with the doctors, and heavily fined the chemist for an alleged breach of the Medical Act. It is unnecessary to review all the facts connected with the case, but it is ex-   ceedingly satisfactory, both to us the general public, to know that when the same case came before the Full Court, on appeal, on the 2nd of the     present month, it was ordered to be   sent back to the magistrate, there to be negatived and the conviction   quashed. Our strictures on Mr. Roe were very strong at the time...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
LEAKE'S CRIMINAL PRESS. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 11 May 1902

LEAKE'S CRIMINAL PRESS. How keenly the West Australian must have felt the poignant sting of Mr. Leake's veno- mous sneer at the "Criminal Press." A leader appeared the next day in which that paper tried to shuffle off the nasty load of crime which Leake had inferentially heaped on it. With an audacity only equalled in Leake's politicl high jinks the editor in charge labored like a log-bound snake with its tail severely pinched to appear free, and to hiss at all the world around him, but at all fearless out-spoken journalism in par- ticular, while ever punctuating the hiss with—"This paper is respectable. This paper is respectable. This paper has the rich Barabbas on its side"—or some such spas-   modic self-assurances of Hackettian virtue.   If the suppress paper issued from Edward VII were otherwise respectable—if it told the truth about the nabobs of the State and   fearlessly exposed the gross wrongs com- mitted by the political frauds, incl...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
CHURCH SCANDAL. A VESTRYMAN ROBBER. PIETY AND PILFERING. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 11 May 1902

A VESTRYMAN ROBBER. PIETY AND PILFERING. Time after time it has been our unpleasant duty to unmask persons who occupy public positions and accept offices of trust in con- nection with societies, and even churches, and who have wilfully abused the confidence re- posed in them. So far as the public are aware these individuals are paragons of honesty and rectitude, but when the cloak   of religion or hypocrisy (or both) is torn from them they should stand with their less influential confreres in the criminal dock. The vestry of St. Albans Anglican Church, Highgate Hill, has been the victim of the embezzlement of trust moneys held by their treasurer—a high official in the railway traffic department, an officer of the 4th Battalion of Infantry, treasurer of the Rail- way Institute and other societies. This pillar of the church, whose quiet and gentle ways endeared him to the clergyman and his wardens, was entrusted with the moneys   belonging to His parish, whic...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
WAGGONS AND WAGIN FITTER. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 11 May 1902

WAGGONS MD WAGIN FITTER.   "Phil" writes :--While people are crying out for want of trucks and engines, the fitter in charge at Wagin again shows that he   lacks the ability for the position which he holds. There a goods train runs from Wagin   to Northam and back every other day. Last   Tuesday the driver of this train advised the fitter in charge at Wagin to send for another driver to take his place on the Thursday   trip, as he was unwell. The driver came   back from Northam with the goods train on Wednesday night and had to go straight to bed, he being very ill. The fitter in charge   never sent for a driver, and the upshot was the goods train had to be cancelled from Thursday till Saturday. Through this the engine was standing idle in the running shed and loaded trucks were standing at all   the sidings between Wagin and Beverley for three or four days, all owing to this fool...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
CYNICAL SYNOPSIS. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 11 May 1902

CYNICAL SYNOPSIS. "All the venal crowd."   —Byron. Leakey policy—promises. Apres Leake le deluge. The policy speech of lazy Leake was a melange of brag and apology. It is where hungry stomachs are that   people know the true meaning of liberty. The bursted bubble of groperdom—Pre- mier Leake. The hire of the Ophir for the Royal tour cost £108,000. The William-street bridge has now a foun- dation of promises. Nanson is preparing another policy speech   to follow Leake's surrendered policy. The   mephitis following the monkey!   Russia is in the throes of civil war in her submerged depths. he struggle is the battle of bread.           Lord Wolseley is pessimistic as to the   future of the war. He will probably be christened a pro-Boer in consequence. There will be no stopping the war now. A fresh goldfield has been discovered in the &nb...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
ALBANY OFFICOALS. A STATIONMASTER'S SLUMBER. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 11 May 1902

ALBANY OFFICIALS. A STATIONMASTER'S SLUMBER. "Albany" writes: I am just letting you     know how the railway service has gone from bad to worse here. On the 23rd April last   I intended going up country. I went to the Albany railway station at the proper time— 6 a.m. The train is advertised to start at 6.10. After waiting fully half an hour the train arrived, but there was no station- master, and the booking office was locked up. Some of the subordinates were there and the guard, but every thing was at sixes and sevens. At last somebody suggested telephoning to the stationmaster, who was at Mount Barker, to know what to do. By       chance they got him, and he replied, "Start the tram, and tell all passengers that they   can get tickets at Torbay Siding !" Is not this a fine state of affairs? It appears that       the stationmaster overslept himself, and ...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
VERSE AND WORSE [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 11 May 1902

VERSE—AND WORSE   "To cheat thee of a sigh, Or charm thee to a tear." —MOORE.   News note: "Western Australia, in the young men now drifting to South Africa, is   losing the flower of its manhood." The   McAuley-flower probably.   ....         An evening paper recently devoted a half column sub-leader to "The social status of   the Siberian soldier.'' After that what's the matter with a series of articles on the wages of barbers' clerks in Central Pata-   gonia? ...         He had been sampling the liquid lyddite   at a none-too-reputable pubbery here-     about, and was complaining (between hic-   coughs) of the quality of the said snifters.   "But I thought they always kept very good   grog there," ventured a fri...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
Our Sunday Serial "THE WOMAN PAYS." CHAPTER I. THE VIGIL IN THE GOAL. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 11 May 1902

OUR SUNDAY SERIAL     ___   "THE WOMAN PAYS." By GERTRUDE ATHERTON. CHAPTER i   THE VIGIL IN THE GAOL. In the dim light that never wholly dies from the corridor at night the cell tiers loomed gigantic, like a huge cliff of steel. One above another, clinging to its sheer face like the fire escapes of a factory, but indefinitely prolonged ran hanging passages marking the level of the cells, whose grated doors shadowed as oblong patches of deeper gloom. Behind big windows looked out upon the lights of the sleeping city, in front towered the precipice of cells, where every dark opening hinted its tragedy and every shadow that that criss-crossed the height or widened away in the distance to terrifying pro- portions seemed to conceal a lurking danger. From one of the cells of the third tier a faint light seemed twice or thrice to glow rather than shine—so faint it was that it came to the eyes of the night clerk, restlessly pacing the sto...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
CHAPTER II. THE DESPERATE FIGHT IN MID AIR. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 11 May 1902

CHAPTER II. THE DESPERATE FIGHT IN MID AIR.   Have you once heard, to remember for ever, the bruit of a mighty emotion breaking suddenly in a throng upon tense stillness ? It was with such a sudden clamor that the gaol awoke. There were men who howled in delight at any break in the dull level of their lives ; there were "trusties"   trying to serve their keepers by prompt alarm ; friends of the Biddles who knew or suspected their wish to escape and planned to confuse pursuit, and who shook and beat upon the bars of their cells. Where was the keeper, Peter Soffel, usually an alert, that the tumult did not arouse him ? Dropping John Biddle's handker- chief, Guard Reynolds came leaping up the stairs to the balconied passage. Below in the main corridor, another guard Koslow, ran forward to see what was amiss. For an instant the two released convicts grappled in mid-air The Brontosaurus. upon the perilous, narrow passage with Reynolds, then a shot was heard and ...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
MYSTERIOUS STONEHENGE. ENGLAND S FAMOUS PREHISTORIC MONUMENT. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 11 May 1902

MYSTERIOUS STONEHENGE. ENGLAND'S FAMOUS PREHISTORIC   MONUMENT. The mysteries of Stonehenge, the most famous prehistoric monument in England, and the best known in the English-speaking world are at last being explained. Recent excavations indicate that Stonehenge was the work of a hitherto unknown race of the Neolithic or New Stone Age. These men advanced in civilisation far beyond the stage indicated by other relics of the Neolithic age. Stone- henge was a sun temple of magnificent simplicity. It contains many monoliths weighing 70 tons each, some of which must have been brought over sea to England. Stonehenge was long sup-   posed to have been a temple of the Druids, an order of priests among the ancient Britons, but this is now known to be wrong, as the Britons could perform no such en- gineering and architectural work. The race that built Stonehenge is now virtually unknown. Observations of the sun from Stonehenge, tak- ing into account that the temple ...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
A GIGANTIC SKELETON—THE BRONTOSAURUS. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 11 May 1902

A GIGANTIC SKELETON—THE BRONTOSAURUS. --- A skeleton of the Brontosaurus, the largest animal that ever lived, has been obtained by the American Museum of Natural History of New York. The skele- ton is ages old—10,000,000 years—according       to some geologists, for the Brontosaurus lived in the Cretaceous period, when rep-     tiles ruled the earth, long before man and Hatchets, Necklace, Jar, and Engraved Stone Found Under Stonehenge. Professor Flinders Petries' Diagram Showing all the Stones. mammals made their appearance or the earth assumed its present external form. The Brontosaurus was a gigantic lizard 70ft. long. His name is formed from two Greek words meaning—"Thunder lizard." This name has been given because some scientists believe that the animal made a noise like thunder when he walked—not an unreasonable supposition. The following are the actual measure- ments of this monster, which have been worked out b...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
CRICKET. The Australian Eleven. ENGLISH FIXTURES. MAY. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 11 May 1902

MAY. 12. Surrey, at Kensingto Oval. 15. Essex, at Leyton.   19. Leicestershire, at Leicester. 22. Oxford Uniyersity, at Oxford. 26. Marylebone, at Lords. 29. First test, at Birmingham or Nottingham. JUNE.                 2. Yorkshire, at Leeds.   6. Lancashire, and Manchester. 9. Cambridge University, at Cambridge. 12. Second Test, at Lords. 19. Derbyshire, at Derby. 23. Yorkshire, at Bradford.   JULY.             3. Third test, at Sheffield.   7. Warwickshire, at Birmingham. 10. Worcestershire, at Worcester.   14. Gloucestershire, at Bristol. 17. Somerset, at Taunton.   21. Surrey. at Kennington Oval. 24. Fourth Test, at Manchester. 28. Essex, at Leyton. 31. Sussex, at Brighton. AUGUST.     &n...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
KENSINGTON PARK RACES. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 18 May 1902

KENSINGTON PARK RACES. The opening of the newly-formed Ken- sington Park (late Sooth Perth) Turf Club took place yesterday. Notwithstanding the counter attraction at Helena Vale there was a very fair attendance. In the Kensington Park Cup Crissy won by two lengths, but a protest was entered by the owner of Ripple jtor interference and the race was awarded to the latter. Following are the results: , OPENING HANDICAP, of 10 soys., four fnrlongs.-Pretty Maid, 7.10 (Cartwright). ii Ripple, 9.7 (Walker), 2; Crissy, 8.9 (Brown), 3. Baby\ (Fuller) . also started. Betting: Evens agst Crissy, 2 to 1 Baby, 3 io I Ripple, 4 to 1 Pretty Maid. A very bad àteiri. Won by a length. Time, 59sec - HTÖBRY SGURBV,of 7 suva., three' fur- longs and a half .-Mahomet, 9.0 (Geddes), 1 ; Miss Galtee, ^8.0 ^ntter), 2; booting Star (M*Causlaud), 3.> Betting^ Ç to 4 on Mahomet, 3 to 1 Miss Galtee and Shooting Stag; Won easily. Time, 50sec. KENSINGTON PARK CUP, of 12 so vs., Five furlongs.-Bipple, .9.4 (Walke...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
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