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Title: Gippsland Mercury Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 32,835 items from Gippsland Mercury, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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IN A LONDON WORKHOUSE CRUELTY AND NEGLECT [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 30 January 1914

IN A LONDON WORKUOUSE CRUELTY AND NEGLECT (By Chris. Massie in the "Daily - Mail.") I do not want anyone to think that lily present abode is a place of unli form harshness and cruelty. On the other hand-setting aside the casual ward, which is one of the worst in the metropolitan area - my present abode has a particularly good nanme for leniency and fair treatment. My contention from the general is this, that cases of cruelty and neglect do happen, and always will happen in institutions of this kind while in mates have no audible voice and no impartial judgment on their griev ances. anI shall take for the special purposes of my article a circumstance which happened some time ago. Of parallel circumstances I have a good and vari ous collection, but this one is chosen I on account of its incontestable accu racy of detail, and because it covers ground which otherwise I should have to trace separately. The facts are these: A man whom I will call H. w'as admitted to the in 1 firmnary atta...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PRIZE ESSAYS TEN GREATEST INVENTIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 30 January 1914

PRIZE ESSAYS TEN GREATEST INVENTIONS. The "Scientific American" offered prizes for the three best essays on the 10 greatest patentable inventions of the past 25 years. No two competitors selected the same inventions. In fact, only one invention, that of wireless tele graphy, was conceded unanimously to belong to the group of the 10 greatest. The vote on aeroplanes was almost unanimous. But beyond that there was no unanimity. The conditions of the contest stated that greatness would be measured in terms of practical sdccess and general usefulness to mankind; the competi tors were limited to machines, de vices and discoveries commercially in troduced in the last 25 years, and saecial emphasis was laid on the fact that the inventions must be pat entable, although not necessarily phtented. The following 12 inventions secured the highest number of votes, the num ber printed after each representing a percentage of the votes given:-Wire less telegraphy, 97; aeroplane, 75; X rgy machine, 74...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FLOGGING CHARGES OFFICIALS WITH SJAMBOKS. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 30 January 1914

FLOGGINGI CHARGES OFFICIALS WITH SJ \MlBsOKS. It is now supposed that the allega tions of flogging and ill-treatment of Indians relate to an affray which oc curred at the Ballengeich mine on No vember 12 (says Rieuters Capetown correspondent). According to a report published by the "Transvaal Leader." the facts are that the mine manager, AIr Hutt. went to Hattingslpruit on Government instructions to gathir together the In dians who had left Ballengeich to take part in the protest march into the Transvaal. They had been arrested on the border and sent back to Natal by train. The Indians quietly followed 3tr Hutt back to the mine. In his absence the Indian women alp peared and harangued the Indians. de nouncing thenm as cowards and fools. The Indians, numbering about 300, be gtn running from the mine, with the apparent intention of beginning afresh the march to the Transvaal. Mr Hutt followed with three or four officials, and headed them off. The Indians he gan throwing volleys of sto...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
OUT IN THE SNOW WIFE'S STORY OF CRUELTY [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 30 January 1914

OUT IN THE SNOW \v.'s STORY OF C I:L TU.'i Y Mrs IHtarriet Beatrict Emery, of Sut ton C!.1 ield. lobtained a divor'c" yes terday (rein her husband, Charles liol land EImery soIn of a Pirnmingha:t atl diermta:t and metal manufacturer (re ports the "Daily News" of Novemnber 2S). Cous?sn' said that Mrs Emery. who was thie daughter of a Birmin.ghalmt brewer. had about £500 a year of her ownI x hen she was nmarried in 1205. The husband was employed in his fa ther's otlice, and was also a hlorSe dealer. He took to drinking, stayiug out late at night, and his conduct be Came violent. In January, 1907, Mrs Emery, re turning from a whist drive with her lrother and his fiancee, was kept out in the snow for half an hour, her hus hand having given Instructions for the door n.?t to be opened. Finally lIe let them in. but he was so violent that the young lady visitor became hysteri cal. Later the husband several times threatened to shoot his wife, and once kicked her out of bed. Ultimntately she ...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MILITARY METHODS STORM IN THE REICHSTAG. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 30 January 1914

MILITARY METHODS STORM IN THE REICHSTAG. In the course of the stormiest sit ting the 1teichstag has experiencetd for over fifteen years (says the Berlin correspondent of the "Daily Express," December ), Germany's expec:-ations that the military outrage at Zabern would be followed by the punishment of the officers apparently responsible for the riot and ridiculous incidents which followed have been bitt,.'y dis appointed. That German officers cannot err was practically asserted by the Chancellor, Dr. von Gethmann-Hollweg, and Gene ral von Falkenhayn, the Prussian war Minister, after representatives of the Alatian Progressive and Socialist parties had complained bitterly about the violence at Zabern and calle'd on the Government to take drastic a.tion against Lieutenant von Foerstner and Colonel von Reuter. The Chancellor's defence of the mili tary excesses was probably the weakest speech he has delivered in the Reich stag since he has been in otlic. As a civilian official he was comp...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MAGAZINE MOTOR CAR VAGARIES OF WRITERS [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 30 January 1914

MAiAZINE MOTOR CAR VAGARIES OF WRITERS One of the.most remarkable pro ducts of the twentieth century is that triumph of mechanical engineering, the Magazine motorcar. It has been remarked that' the gentlemen. who write the glawing advertisements of "I-Houses to Let" have obviously never lived in them." It is equally obvious (says "Motor News") that the worthy . folk who write, in the popular magazines, hair curling short stories about motorcars have never driven in them. It was, of course, inevitable that with the rapid advance of the motorcar in popular favor there should be a cor responding advance in the popular imagination on the subject. In.-this case the proverb must be reversed, for assuredly the short story-tellers make fiction stranger than truth. There are several different models of the magazine motorcars, but, so far as essentials are concerned, the specification is common to all. It fre quently has eight cylinders; seldom fewer than six. It has a gigantic body, painted ...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SAROJINI NAIDU POETESS AND LEADER. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 30 January 1914

SAROJiNI NAIDU POETESS AND LEADER. Mrs Sarojini Naidu, B.A., whom Mr Edmund Gosse describes as the most brilliant, the most original, as well as the most correct, of all the natives of Hindustan who have written in Eng lish," and who is in England, has been interviewed by a representative of the "Westminster Gazette." Mrs Naidu, who is small in stature and frail-looking in appearance, is a typically dainty and sweet-tempered Woman of the East. She is a student, an orator, and a l)oetess-a poetess who dreams continually of that land of which she has said: "My ancestors for thousands of years have been lov ers of the forest and mountain caves. great dreamers, great scholars, great ascetics." Mrs Naidu comes of a widely re spected Brahmin family of Bengal. Of her father, Dr. Aghorenath Chatto fadhy'ay, who is well known in India, she says: "My father is a dreamer himself, a great dreamer, a great man whose life has been a magntiicent fail ure. I suppose in the whole of India there are ...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
POLICE SAMARITANS [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 30 January 1914

POLICE SAMARITANS "I think it is right that tho public should know they have men like this in their police force," said Captain Jacobsen, a Scandinavian, in telling the "Daily News" on November 14 of an act of humanity by a sergeant of the city police. Captain Jacobsen has charge of a Scandinavian shipping bureau in Fen church street. This little affair. he went on, has so touched me that, whether the sergeant likes it or not, I am going to tell it. Recently this police oilicer came to me and said he had found in a city street at night an elderly seaman, stranded anid destitute. The man was at Dane. The sergeant kindly said he did not want to lock the fellow up. The man was a seaman all right, and locking hinmt up, said the sergeant, '_'umld do him no good. The police a?lan had been feeding the man, and had tixed him up in a lodging-house. C'aptain Jacobsen explained that of teiurse he got numbers of such eases, antld had to be careful. But he invited thie ci:y police officer to bri...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PUZZLED JUDGE MYSTERIOUS LETTERS. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 30 January 1914

PUZZLED JUDGE MYSTERIOUS LETITERS. The strange divorce suit in which charges against each other were made by Mlr Oran Edgar Starr, a Harley street dentist, and his wife, ended yes terday in the victory of the husband (reports the "Daily Express" of De cember 12). It was decided by the jury that there had been no cruelty by Mr Starr, and that Mrs Starr had been guilty of mis conduct. Mr Starr was granted a decree ntsi. and his wife's petition for a judicial selparation was dismissed. The principal figures in the case, apart from the husband and wife, are: Mr Cuthbertson, or "Gibson," the co-respondent, who was said to have visited Mrs Starr while her husband was in America. "Sammy," also said to have visited Mrs Starr. Miss Annie Hilliger, sister of Mrs Starr's maid's sweetheart. "Sammy's" chauffeur, whom Miss Hilliger believes to be a myth. It was stated by counsel that Mrs Starr borrowed money from Miss Hil liger, and that she handed Miss Hilli ger letters purporting to come from "...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DUEL BY PROXY "PIERRE LOTI" CHALLENGED. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 30 January 1914

DUEL BY PROXY "PIERRE LOTI" CHALLENGED. Some weeks ago Lieutenant Turcom. of the Bulgar!an Army. sent a chal lenge to Captain Julien Vlaud. of the French Navy. better kn.wn by his lite rary Iseudonym of "Pierre Loti." says the Part., correspondent of the "Mrorn ing Post" on November 10. Pierre Lotl as champion of the Turkish cause. has, in a number of published articles and pamphlets, spoken in very strong terms of the atrocities alleged to have been committed by the Bulgarians in the war. As M. Lotl decided to ignore this challenge. It was taken up by an officer of the Turkish army and several French journalists. After the various complications which so often arise in an affair of honor it was decided that a duel should take place between the well-known swordsman M. Brelttmayer and Lieutenant Turcom. The weapons chosen were swords. The duel took place this morning. and the two adversaries fought so courageously that the spectatocs foared on several occasions that it might have a fa...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"THE WITCH" SOUTH RUSSIAN EPISODE [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 30 January 1914

"THE WITCH" SOUTH RUSSIAN EPISODE By Denis Garstin, in the "Westminster Gazette." "I do not think," said Tropheme, "that she is altogether a witch, but she is very awful. She is a hundred and fifty years old, and she has sixty cats. Once she quarrelled with her brother -long ago-and he killed her pet cat, and she did something very ter rible to him; I forget what she did, I think she killed him. He died." Tropheme is a thoroughly untrust worthy in his narratives, but then no body, except himself, believes them. Whenever I had been to the village Tropheme would hover round my room in the hope of my having brought back some chocolate. The children often used to leave bogus packets about the gardens, and take delight in watching the big-bearded Russian workmen snatch up the empty temptations. The simple crea tures never learnt wisdom or caution against the fraud, until at last even the children took pity on them, and their great faith was rewarded by c casional sweets. But in particula...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CLAREMONT BROTHERHOOD EXPERIENCES IN AUSTRALIA. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 30 January 1914

CLAREMONT BROTHERHOOD EXPERIENCES IN AUSTRALIA. Speaking at the Claremont Brother hood on Sunday afternoon on the social life of Australia (says the "Islington Gazette" of December 10). the Rev. Victor Bell said that the conditions were very similar to those prevailing in England. He believed that the ave ruge drink bill was greater over here. but there were more drunkards in Aus tralia in proportion.. Another failing that was very appar ent in New South 'Vales was the gam bling habit, and these two were the most difficult and hateful obstacles in the way of its reformers. In Sydney every man and boy seemed to be try ing to get sixpence without working for it. Gambling was degrading and brutal ising numbers of its inhabitants, and he considered that. on the whole, this vice had a far more degenerate effect on a man than drink. The aborigine of Australia had been quick to copy the white man in his vices. The speaker said that in his own township, where 230 acres had been allotted for...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
QUEEN MOTHER INTEREST IN REFUGE. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 30 January 1914

QUEEN MOTHlER INTEREST IN REFUGE. Queen Alexandra received a warm welcome from thousands of people on her arrival at King's Cross on Satur day afternoon to open formally the Hostel for Women erected as a me morial to Mary Lady Curzon, late wife of Earl Curzon (says "Lloyd's Weekly" of November 30). Her Majesty was accompanied by Princess Victoria, the Hon. Charlotte Knollys, and Colonel Streatfeild. Miss Sergeanston, an aged Cumberland lady, who is an inmate of the hostel, handed to her Majesty a very fine bouquet of lilies of the valley and mauve orchids. The Royal party were conducted to a platform erected in the hostel kitchen. The Duchess of Marlborough, who presided, said that she hoped this hostel was only the first of a long line of in stitutioos calculated to mark a deeper sense of society's obligation to women, as well as an appropriate memorial to one who set a beautiful example to her sisters. Earl Curzon said that it was now seven years since Lady Curzon passed away. Dur...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
EMPLOYER BEAT TYPISTS "RUSSIAN PRACTICES" [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 30 January 1914

EMPLOYER BEAT TYPISTS "RUSSIAN PRACTICES" "if these practices are permissible in Russia they are not permissible here," declared Mir Allan Lawrie, De puty Chairman of the London Ses sions, yesterday, in sentencing Joseph Marcus Copelvitz Josephson to twelve months' imprisonment for assaulting Violet Sharp, of Paulet road, Camber well, one of his al)prenticed typists (says the "Daily News" of December 5). Mr Lawrie added that the priso ner would be recommended for de portation. Josephson pleaded guilty to a com mon assault, and added: "I misunder stood my position as a, master. I thought I was justified in punishing." Mr Curtis Bennett, who prosecuted, re-told the story recently given in evidence at the police court proceed ings. lHe recalled the prisoner's writ ten declaration to a parent: "I am a strict disciplinarian ... I make no distinction of sex," and went on to relate how a "book of faults" was kept. When seven faults were entered up against Violet Sharp Josephson said, "I mu...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
VOLUNTARY INSURANCE GAIN TO FRIENDLY SOCIETIES. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 30 January 1914

VOLUNTARY INSURANCE GAIN TO FRIENDLY SOCIETIES. (By .Margaret Douglas, in "The Daily Mail.") If the compulsory Insurance Act had no other defects, the multiplicity of cooks w3uld probably spoil the insur ance broth. The officials of friendly societies who have for years past car ried on their quiet but magnificent wcrk have now to be in constant touch with a number of committees, referees, audi tors, and inspectors, while the Insur ance Commissioners are always hover ing in the background armed with a spoonful of new regulations, special or ders or provisional special orders, to stir into the refreshing decoction. This multiplication of authorities is not only costly to an absurd degree, but it will restrict the free development of the mutual benefit societies to a very serious extent. No movements in his tory have been more spontaneous, more true to national tradition, and less ham pered by oflicial interference than the friendly society and trade union move ments in this country. ...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LAND AND LABOR PREMIER'S VIEW. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 30 January 1914

LAND AND LABOR PREMIER'S VIEW. "We have met to inaugurate an or ganised movement whose primary pur pose it is to inform and to stimulate public opinion as to the urgency of land problems and the necessity of land reform," declared Mr Asquith at a dinner to inaugurate the new Central Land and Housing Council. Dealing first with the condition of the rural population, the Premier said the prospects of the mass of the agricul tural community depended on the wages of the rural laborer. "In Durham and Northumberland the average weekly earnings of the agri cultural laborer were 21/ and 22/. In Oxfordshire and Norfolk they ranged from just below to just above 15/. "What do I mean when I say 'mini mum wage?' I mean a wage such as to ensure to the laborer of average indus try and prudence reasonable conditions of living, among which I include the ability to pay commercial or economic rent for the house In which he lives. "The three salient features of the houging conditions are these:-(1) The...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GIRL DRUGGED [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 30 January 1914

GIRL DRUGGED A new method practised by white slavers to secure victims is believed to have been discovered by the police of Newark. New Jersey (says the New York correspondent of "The Daily Ex press" of December 6). It is alleged that they inject opiates into attractive girls during the darkness in moving picture theatres, and then pose as rela tives and carry them off. This system has been brought to light by the arrest last night, at a cinema palace at Newark. of Armand Megaro, a South American employed as a chemist's assistant. Megaro was committed for trial to-day, £4000 bail being required, after Mrs. Marjorie Graff, the bride of two weeks of a Newark civil engineer, had told her story in court. Mrs. Graff said that she occupied a seat in a box, and that Megaro entered her box from another, and took a seat beside her. Suddenly she experi enced a pricking sensation in her wrist, and in a few moments she felt ill and faint, and went to the ladles' parlor, where an attendant reviv...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GERMANY AND BRITAIN. PRINCE BULOW'S BOOK. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 30 January 1914

GiERMANY AND BRITAIN. PRINCE BULOW'S BOOK. The most interesting part of Prince Bulow's book on foreign policy deals with the present difference between the French and the British attitude to Ger many (says the Berlin correspondent of "The Daily News"). "It is true." the Prince says, "that England is seriously concerned by our growing naval power and by our competition, which incon veniences her at many points. It is true also that there are still English men who believe that 'England could only profit by the disappearance of the obnoxious German rival. But there is a distinct difference between such English sentiments and the basic sen timent of France. "France would attack us if and when she thought she was in a position of sufficient power, while England would only attack us if she came to the con clusion that she could only carry through her vital economic and politi cal interests against Germany by force. The mainspring of England's political attitude to us is national egotism, ...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
INDIAN REFORMERS [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 30 January 1914

INDIAN REFORMERS A. correspondent especially well in formed on the subject writes to the "Westminster Gazette" on November 21:- Gopal Krishna Gokhale was born in Kolapur, Poona. He is a Brahmin, and politics have ever beren a passion with this Maharashtra -rahmin. As a stu dent he was known for his great abi lity, retentive memory, and steady ap plication. In 18S4 he became a member of the Deccan Education Society. For about twenty years Mr Gokhale filled the Chair cof History and Political Eco nomy in the Fergusson College, Poeona. one of the best colleges in the whole of India. As a lecturer Mr Gopal Krishna Gok hale spent almost all his time and en ergy for the twenty years of his youth. It was the late Justice Ranade who chose Gokhale as one of his elect, and initiated him into the mysteries of politics. Since that day Gokhale has never missed any single opportunity to work for his Motherland. In 1S97 he came to England to give evidence before the Royal Commission on Indian expe...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CONVICT SNOBS [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 30 January 1914

CONVICT SNOBS There has been a movement for separate tables at meals among the convicts at the prison "hotel" at Camp Hill, Isle of Wight, where an attempt is made to reform convicts by special privileges (says the "Daily Mail"). Meal times at Camp Hill are social functions which the warders are not permitted to disturb. These old. habitual criminals, who have been granted many comforts by the autho rities, have after-dinner chats which are often of a strictly confidential nature. Lately a distinct "caste" feeling has sprung up. The more notorious men have formed a clique. They decline to discuss subjects with men of less repute. Apart from this purely pro fessional jealousy, there are sharp cleavages of opinion, religious, moral. and political, which have been so marked that further controversy on gentlemanly lines is out of the ques tion. The result is that things have not been so happy as formerly at the long tables in the diningroom. Several men have the habit of leaning across ...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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