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Elephind.com contains 8,145 items from Grenville Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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A Puncl. Saved His Life. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 April 1915

A PuncL Saved His Life. Leading Seaman Daniel Allison, whose address, for obvious reasons, is •merely "His Majesty's Navy," gives the following account of how a young hero was severely injured in a suc cessful endeavor to save the life of a friend: "I want to express my thanks," he writes, "to my Scotch pal. I am a leading seaman on board one of H.M. cruisers. This lad was only a new hand from B Depot. They call ed him Scottie. His name was, I think, D. Brown. We were at the bombardment of Z , the German naval base. Suddenly our officer came over and said, 'Boys, we are lost!' We knew what that meant, and you can picture how I felt. I got a punch on the head from Scottie, which made me fall. I got angry, and was about to strike him, but the poor lad was lying there bleeding terribly. I began to realise What had happened, and I turned him round, but only heard him say, 'Danny.' Then the petty-officer came over and told me he had saved my life, but had got his own leg cut. Something h...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BACILLI OR BULLETS. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 April 1915

BACILLI OR BULLETS. Which Kill the Most Soldiers. Modern science has done much to banish disease amongst soldiers, and the scourges of small-pox, malaria, and cholera, which in former .cam paigns have killed more men than bullets, have lost much of their men ace for 'fighting men. There still re main, however, diseases such as dys entery, pneumonia, and enteric, ■which are likely to break out amongst bodies of troops unless careful pre cautions are taken by the men them selves. Dysentery is one of the most terri ble of camp diseases, and during the South African War it killed' thou sands, for during that campaign, out of our 22,000 casualties, bullets ac counted for only 8000 and disease 14,000. Dysentery, which is an inflamma tion of the internal organs, is gener ally caused through impure water. Soldiers at the front have been given directions to boil the water they drink, whenever possible, though, of course, there are obvious difficulties in the way of providing every soldier wi...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Brought Back His Pal. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 April 1915

Brought Back His Pal. A remarkable instance of British pluck and nonchalance is narrated by an officer in the R.A.M.C. "One of the wounded," he says, "told me he noticed some new digging going on on the side of the enemy in front of his firing post. Although this was in broad daylight, our man thought he would go and see what the Germans were up to, so he jumped over the side of his trench and ran forward thirty yards to a ditch, and crawled 'along it some hundred yards or so. Not satisfied with this point of view, he sprinted to a line of willows near er still to the enemy—within 250 yards of them, indeed—and proceeded | to climb up one of them. While do | ing this he got shot through the shoulder. Meanwhile, a great pal of his in the regiment, hearing that he had gone out, jumped over the trench i and set off to look for him, coming up with him" just as he got hit. The sec ond man upbraided the first round ly for being a fool, and then carried his rifle for him and brought him saf...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE Grenville Standard, PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. Printed and published by HUBERT ALFRED ADAMS Sole Proprietor, at the office of the "Greuville Standard" newspaper, Clyde street, Linton, in the State of Victoria. Registered at the General Post Office, Melbourne, for transmission as a newspaper. SATURDAY, APRIL 17, 1915. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 April 1915

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. Printed and published by Hubert Alfred Ada.ms Sole Proprietor, at the office of the "Greuville Standard" newspaper, Clyde street, Linton, in the State of Victoria. Registered at the General Post Office, Melbourne, for transmission as a newspaper. SATURDAY, APRIL 17, 1915. A new and well-organised attempt is now being made to secure the legalisa tion of the Totalisator in Victoria. • The V.R.C. and other agencies have been urging the Government to introduce a bill. A majority of the Government is opposed, but consents to facilities for discussion in Parliament. The votaries of racing are enterprisingly presenting their case to the public. The V.R.O. proclaims that it seeks the good of the community and the good of the turf. hether machine betting can secure srtch benefits is a matter of opinion, but from a racing point of view the Totalisator is a suceess. It is financi ally remunerative, and has other points of advantage to those who are resolved to gamble....

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 April 1915

Indian Motocycles © NEW 1915 MODELS. 4-h.p. Single-cylinder Models, spring | frame, free engine - - £50 t 1 1 3! h.p. Twins - - - - £61 'i - . j 7-h.p. Twins - - - - £68 I Nine Prominent Improvements on 1915 Models. I Write to-day for Illustrated Catalog, for j warded post free. 1ASSEY SICYCLE DEPOT, Sole District Agent, 123 Sturt St., Ballarat. Tel. 505. Opp. Post Office. THE MAN WHO BUYS. lit A ROLFE CYCLE Knows that his Money is Spent to the Best Possible Advantage. ~|Q>OLFE CYCLES srive the maximum strength at. a minimum of weight, making thera Ji_4i easy to ride, and yet, by reason of the flawless material used throughout their con struction, strong enough to outlast many more expensive machines. THE BRAZING is Absolutely Guaranteed, and every inch-of the machine has been made by Expert Cycle Specialists. CALL and let us show you the 1913 ROLFE— a better machine at the price does not exist. 1E£ jES ES,'3S • 3ES, O "Km HE"0 3ES 9 .30 ARMSTRONG STREET NORTH, BALLARAT. Let US m...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Methodist Circuit. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 April 1915

The quarterly meeting of the Scars dale and Linton Methodist circuit was held at Smythesdale on the 7th" inst.; the Rev. R. L. Reed presiding. There was a good attendance of officials and representatives. Reports were submitted in connection with the various Christian Endeavor So cieties, some of which were most en couraging. Mr J. J. Jennings, lay representative to Conference, gave an account of Con ference proceedings, and was heartily thanked for the same. Finances were well op,, leaving., a good- surplus . after . meeting all demands, which to all was a cause of much gratitude, and an evi dence of the interest manifested by mem bers and adherents throughout the cir cuit. A very profitable discussion took place upon the question what can be done to promote the work of God in the cir cuit, of which we hope much good will be accomplished. Amongst other sug gestions, one was very prominent—Get back to old time methods—a plea for re-establishment of the class meeting, the erection of...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LOCAL AND GENERAL. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 April 1915

LOCAL AND GENERAL. In the list of subscribers to the Bel gian Relief Fund published in last issue, the name " Miss L. Jennings " should have been " Miss G. Jennings." ; Splendid rain fell on Sunday and Monday last, breaking up the drought all over Victoria. The registration at Linton for the five days from Friday to Tuesday inclusive was 207 points. About the same amount fell at Snake Valley, and 152 points was recorded at Skipton. The weather since has been fine and mild, and already the grass is showing in the pastures. Mis3 Beccie M'Donald, who acted as secretary to the recent Melba concert at .Ballarat in aid of the Belgian Relief Fund, has promised to provide a pro gramme for the Linton concert to which we referred last week. The date is now uncertain, and depends on Miss M'Don ald's arrangements. In addition to the Ballarat performers, the young people of Linton are preparing a cantata, with which, the concert will probably be opened. As we go to press, we learn that the date ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"Alexander the Great." [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 April 1915

"Alexander the Great." The exploit of fourteen-year-old Alexander Cherviatkin, according to a Moscow correspondent, is without parallel, either in this or any other war. At Warsaw the boy was enroll ed in a troop of scouts, and received orders to carry out a reconnaissance. Slipping out under cover of darkness, Cherviatkin made his way towards the German lines, but was captured. Owing to his youth, no strict guard seems to have been kept over him, and nnder cover of ni^ht'he succeeded in creeping away . through the Ger man lines. But, not content merely with escaping, he had the audacity to steal a German flag from a sleeping sta>ndard-bearer, and with his pre cious trophy he fell into the line of the searchlight. The Germans at once opened fire and wounded Cher viatkin in the side, but the boy man aged to stagger, into the Russian trenches, and was duly awarded the St. George's Cross.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE HOUSEHOLD. SELECTED RECIPES. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 April 1915

THE HOUSEHOLD. SELECTED RECIPES. Russian Mince.—Cut a pound of cold meat into small pieces, also any cold vegetables, ham, bacon, or a suet pud ding, if you have one- at band. Fry all in a little dripping. Season with pepper, salt, finely-chopped onion, pars ley, and a tablespoonful of vinegar. Stir all together over the fire and serve on hot toast. Apple Charlotte. — Take two pounds of apples, pare, core, and slice them into a pan, and add one pound of sugar, the juice of three lemons, and the grated rind of one. Let these boil until they become a thick mass, which will require about two hours; pour it into a mould, and when cold turn out on to a dish. Serve with either cijs tard or cream. Steamed Fig Pudding. — One cup ful of chopped figs, half a cupful oi. chopped suet, three eggs, two and a ' quarter cupfuls of soft breadcrumbs, ! a third of a cupful of milk, one cup ful of brown sugar, and one teaspoon ful of salt. Cover breadcrumbs with milk. Chop'figs and suet togetner, add o...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BURLEIGH'S OPINION. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 April 1915

BURLEIGH'S OPINION. That retribution would overtake Germany when she matched forces with France was prophesied as long ago as March, 1913, by the late Mr. Bennet Burleigh, the veteran war cor respondent, who had seen more fight ing than any man of his generation. ! In an interview in a Jersey news paper he unhesitatingly pronounced France to be the first militant power of Europe owing to the genius, dash and power of concentration of her forces? together with the great and solid wealth of the nation. "If a con test breaks out," he said, "patriotism and united fervor will carry France a long way. In bygone days German drill and methods were no match for the sprightly, fearless soldiery of France, but Germans are heavy and numerous, though slow."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IBSEN THE GLOOMY. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 April 1915

IBSEN THE GLOOMY. Another light is thrown upon the demeanor of Ibsen by a contribution which recently appeared in "Harper's Magazine." In this contribution Ma dame de Hegermann says she first met Ibsen at a supper given by the King of Sweden—• "The celebrated dramatist honored this feast with his presence, and es pecially honored the Chianti and Gen zano wines, which were served copi ously. When you see Ibsen,, with his lion face and tangled hair, for Nthe first time you are fascinated by him, know ing what a genius he is; but when you talk with him and feel his critical piercing eyes looking at you from under his bushy brows, and see his cruel satirical smile, you are a little prejudiced against him. When we met him often at our friend Ross's studio at afternoon teas, where there is always a little music, Ibsen sat sullen, silent, and indifferent. He does not like music, and does not dis guise his dislike. This is not, as you •may imagine, inspiring to the per formers. In fact, jus...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FROM THE FIRING LINE. "Good-bye, You Fellows!" [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 April 1915

FROM THE FIRING LINE. "Good-bye, You Fellows!" It is wath a brave, cheery word and a calm, clear courage that our re serve gunners take the places of their comrades who have been shot down at the guns, knowing full well that they in turn c&n scarcely hope to sur vive. Here is a typical instance: Thirty gunners of a British field bat tery had just been killed and wound ed. Thirty others, knowing that they were going to their death, took their places. "Good-bye, you fellows," they said to their comrades in the reserve line, as they walked to the guns. Two minutes afterwards every man had been put out of action, and another thirty went to the front with the same farewell, smoking cigarettes as they went to almost certain death. Eventually the persistence and accur acy of the British fire had their effect on the German artillery, and British infantry was able to advance and take the opposing position at the point of the bayonet.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
No Clue. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 April 1915

No Clue. Farmer: Somebody stole three sets of harness out of my stable. Policeman: Did the thief leave any traces? i Farmer: No; he took traces and all! Teacher: Now, children, who can tell me which is the Germans' favor ite drink? After ' a pause—"Champagne," ex claimed all the class excepting Tommy. Teacher: Now, Tommy, don't you agree with the others? Tommy: Well, teacher, I don't know. I am not sure that the German army are fond of champagne, but all the world knows that their navy always stick to port."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SUNSET AND DAWN CHAPTER XXIII. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 April 1915

SUNSET AND DAWN By EFFIE ADELAIDE ROWLANDS. (Published by arrangement with Ward, Lock & Co. Ltd., Lon. & Melb.) All Rights Reserved. CHAPTER XXIII. Though in that moment of strange excitement the man whom Sir Clar ence Rookwood had adopted declared that he remembered all, in reality memory only came back to him in dis connected and very unsatisfactory fashion. The word "Margaret" 'had waken ed one vivid train of recollection. It had brought back pictures, that had been blotted out completely; a vision of a girl with lovely eyes and a sunny smile, a girl whom he could see standing in the summer sun shine, coming towards him in the summer dusk, a girl who had lain in his arms and touched his lips with hers. This vision of Margaret was wonderfully clear, wonderfully real; but when he tried to sit and connect this vision naturally with other events; to tell the man who was so eager to listen and to hear all thai had existed in his life before that tra gedy which had sent...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE BOND. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 April 1915

THE BOND. By Leslie Thomas. "I'll advance the money," agreed John Chesilton, deliberately, at last. Sherwin drew a deep breath. The half-minute of waiting had seemed in terminable. "Wholly prepared for a refusal, he was almost dumbfounded. Furtively he wiped his forehead. Chesilton was not looking in his direc tion, but stared out of the library win dow. Sherwin had time to compose himself and assume a confident ex pression. His tone, when he spoke again, was intended to infer that he was by no means surprised. "I thought you might." His lip curl ed slightly. "My wife hinted " "Ah! Mrs. Sherwin advised you to come to me?" "Oh, no; she merely mentioned.your name—among others." The two men faced one another. | Sherwin was the younger by fifteen (years or so; his companion's hair was touched with grey. But Sherwin sat in a round-shouldered fashion; his glance was inclined to be shifty; he was untidily dressed, and he needed a shave. There could be no doubt he was the less capable man; ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BOHEMIA'S DEATH CURSE The Prophecy of a Soothsayer and its Bearing on the Struggle of To-day. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 April 1915

BOHEMIA'S DEATH CURSE The Prophecy of a Soothsayer and its Bearing on the Struggle of To-day. Originally a beneficent prophecy, the seizure by a foreign usurper of the throne of Bohemia converted the ut terance of Libussa of Bohemia into a curse. Far away back in the mists of centuries, lived the first ruler of Bohemia, Prince Krokus, the youngest of whose daughters, Libussa, excelled , in wisdom her two sisters, and was a type of chastity, the noblest of her ' sex, but vulnerable in that she was a soothsayer. She was popularly elected ruler of the people on her father'^ death, and the foundation of the Bo hemian royal capital of Prague is ascribed to her exertions. Female rule grew irksome, however, and Li bussa, while settling a dispute be tween two noblemen, was insulted by the loser, who ridiculed the fact of female governance by holding his country up to shame in that it was the only one so ruled. "With ready re source uhe bade them choose a man to rule over them, and promised ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XXIV. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 April 1915

CHARTER XXIV. Margaret Princess Petkoff, was ly ing on a couch in the big hotel bed room. The journey the day before had fatigued her. She had been very ill, and all movement overtaxed her strength. Captain Beresford was right when he said that she had lost her looks. She had grown so very thin. Her beautiful color had faded. As she lay with closed eyes shivering under the fur rug which one of her maids had thrown across her, she looked incred ibly wasted, so wasted as to seem an old woman. So, at least, thought one person who stood now looking at her in a fixed and almost insolent fash ion. Mademoiselle Slivinski had the right to come and go in the Princess's apartments just as she liked. It pleased Leah to see how surely her rival was withering, and yet it stung her too, for it marked the dif ference between this other girl and herself. It showed how the real essence of pride can support and dignify. Had Petkoff treated her with a quarter the cruelty he had used to liis wife, Leah...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Compensation. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 April 1915

Compensation. Tenant: Last night the rain came in through the roof and gave me . a regular shower bath. You ought to do something. | Landlord: What do you expect me f to do? Give you soap and towels! I | Peevishness may be considered the J canker of life that destroys its vigor I and checks its improvement, that I creeps on with hourly depredations j and taints and vitiates what it cannot consume. Shortly after marriage a man be gins to realise that he talked too much during the courtship.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WOMAN'S INFLUENCE IN JAPAN. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 April 1915

WOMAN'S INFLUENCE IN JAPAN. During that which is known as "the Heian period"—from the eighth to the eleventh century—the Japanese wo man was at the height of her power , and influence. The social position is thus described by Professor S. Sassa in the "Japan Magazine"— "It was in fact an age when woman set the standard in everything. In many cases they were not given in marriage even, but sons were adopted into the family for the daughters who needed husbands, the men losing their family names in those of their wives. The daughters were given a special establishment in the homestead com pound or in a country villa, whither they resorted with their husbands, the latter sallying forth by day for duty • and returning promptly at night to * their mistresses. It is also clear from the literature of the time that woman occupied the chief place in society. It would seem that daughters were given a position even above their mothers; for in such works as the 'Genji Mono gatari' there is refe...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY ABOUT THE WAR. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 April 1915

WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY ABOUT THE WAR. If only our new armies are ready in time, the soil of both France and Bel gium should be clear of the enemy by the beginning of next June.—Mr. Ash mead Bartlett. When we have won—not if we win Peace, Civilisation, Humanity will re turn to this earth for a century— during which Britain will guard and disseminate all three.—Mr. Frederic Harrison. We shall destroy the Prussian mur derer, give peace to Europe, and trans form the poor Germans—now the Kai ser's "cannon food"—into free men.— Sir Ray Lankester. The British Navy has, with the aid of the Allied fleets, driven the German flag from the high se.as. Thanks to that, the Allies can draw their supplies from the whole world, while Germany is suffering economic pressure, which in the end may prove the decisive fac tor in the war.—Sir George Buchanan. I am convinced that the efforts of all those who are fighting at this moment for the cause of right, justice and lib erty for the peoples, great and sm...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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